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King Kong Documentary Long Live The King Now Available for Digital Purchase on Amazon Video and YouTube

If you missed Long Live The King when it played last November at The St. Louis International Film Festival, you can now watch it on Amazon Video and YouTube! The 2016 documentary Long Live The King explores the enduring fascination with one of the biggest stars in Hollywood history: the mighty King Kong. Long Live The King is produced and directed by Frank Dietz and Trish Geiger, the creative team behind the award-winning Beast Wishes (the 20112 documentary about Bob and Kathy Burns, the goodwill ambassadors of science fiction film fandom. Long Live The King devotes primary attention to the 1933 classic, celebrating the contributions of filmmakers Merian C. Cooper and Ernest B. Schoedsack, stars Fay Wray, Robert Armstrong, and Bruce Cabot, writer Edgar Wallace, and especially stop-motion innovator Willis O’Brien. But Kong’s legacy is also fully detailed: the sequel “Son of Kong,” the cinematic kin “Mighty Joe Young,” the Dino DeLaurentis and Peter Jackson remakes,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Destroy All Monsters: Peter Jackson's King Kong Was Kong, Perfected

It's always a pleasure to write a sentence about a film that the filmmaker himself would recoil from in disgust, but here it is anyway: Peter Jackson's 2005 King Kong remake is the best King Kong movie, surpassing the original. I wrote this before seeing Jordan Vogt-Roberts' Kong: Skull Island this week, so this isn't intended as a knock on that movie, though as with most of the King Kong spinoffs (Son of Kong, King Kong Lives, Kong Kong vs. Godzilla), there's nothing in Skull Island's plot structure that allows it to come close to the weird, earned pathos of the original, or Jackson's remake. Which is a long way of saying: I like my Kong tragic, and Jackson's Kong, building on and enhancing Merian...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Eight Little-Known Facts About King Kong

  • Cinelinx
The latest movie to bring the super-sized simian Kong to the big screen, Kong: Skull Island, comes out today. Kong is a very well-known movie monster, but there are some things you probably don’t know about the Eighth Wonder of the World. Here are seven bits of trivia about King Kong.

1. Despite popular belief, the name “Skull Island” was never used in the original King Kong. For decades, people have used that name to describe Kong’s island home. The new movie uses “Skull Island” in its title. But the fact is, that name was never used in the classic first version. When the characters in that version reach the island, they know they’ve come to the right place because they see “Skull Mountain”, so-named because it’s shaped like a skull. However, the island itself is never named—only Skull Mountain is.

2. The very first Japanese Kaiju movie was a little-known,
See full article at Cinelinx »

The true story behind Universal suing Nintendo over King Kong and Donkey Kong

Luke Owen looks back at the court battle between Universal and Nintendo

“[King Kong] surpasses anything of its type which has gone before it in commercial film-making. The work has many flaws, but they’re overcome by the general results. The errors will probably be overlooked… While not believing it, audiences will wonder how it’s done. If they wonder they’ll talk, and that talk plus the curiosity the advertising should incite ought to draw business all over. Kong mystifies as well as it horrifies, and may open up a new medium for scaring babies via the screen.” – Variety’s 1933 review of King Kong.

Released in 1933, Merian C. Cooper’s King Kong did indeed draw business all over. It’s opening at Radio City Music Hall saw every one of its ten shows sold out, with people queuing around the block to see the giant ape on screen. Tickets cost between 35 and 75 cents,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Famous Primates in Film: A Brief History

  • Cinelinx
Later this month, the mighty Kong returns to the big screen! To celebrate, we’re looking back at all the major primate appearances in film.

For as long as films were being made, humans have starred alongside primates. Unlike other animals, their human-like qualities can lend a sense of comedy or horror. Throughout the history of film, primates have been used to fulfill certain roles. In the early days, they were often a form of antagonist, carrying out dastardly deeds or causing mayhem. More common is the primate cast in a role of mischief, causing all sorts of comedic hijincks. While most primate roles were portrayed by live animals, it was not uncommon for men to dress up in ape suits for roles where the primates needed to carry out specific actions. Later, the advent of CGI has led to men mimicking primates in real time to create a motion-capture performance.
See full article at Cinelinx »

Kong: Skull Island TV spot shows off tons (maybe too much) new footage

  • JoBlo
I love me some King Kong. I loved the original '33 version, I loved Peter Jackson's 2005 version, and even liked some of the stuff in the '70s version. Hell, I don't even hate the cash-in Son Of Kong sequel! So I'm definitely down for Kong: Skull Island, unnecessary as it is. And if it means a showdown between him and Godzilla down the line? More power to it!... Read More...
See full article at JoBlo »

Here’s your first look at Kong in ‘Kong: Skull Island’

The very first image from the upcoming Warner Bros. blockbuster Kong: Skull Island has been released online courtesy of Entertainment Weekly. We’ve got quite a few more months until this one hits cinemas, but this image gives us our clearest look at King Kong yet.

Jordan Vogt-Roberts is directing the 1970s set film, which stars Tom Hiddleston as a British Special Forces vet and Brie Larson as a war photographer. Vogt-Roberts spoke about the design of his new movie to the entertainment magazine.

“I had a mandate that I wanted a kid to be able to doodle him on the back of a piece of homework and for his shapes to be simple and hopefully iconic enough that, like, a third grader could draw that shape and you would know what it is,” he said. “A big part of our Kong was I wanted to make something that gave
See full article at The Hollywood News »

King Kong Fully Revealed in Kong: Skull Island

King Kong Fully Revealed in Kong: Skull Island
This March, we're getting a new King Kong movie in the form of Kong: Skull Island. It's a period piece that takes place mostly on this fantastical island of giant creatures, discovered sometime in the 1970s. And one thing is clear, this ain't your Grandfather's Kong. Nor is it your older sister's Kong, as it has nothing to do with Peter Jackson's 2005 remake. This Kong is bigger, badder and more ferocious.

While we've seen Kong hiding in the shadows of his own first trailer, today we get the first full image of the giant ape courtesy of Entertainment Weekly. And he is certainly a sight to behold. Majestic might be the wrong word to use.

The guy is gargantuan. And so is his supporting cast. Kong: Skull Island boasts an ensemble of Academy Award Winners and nominees lead by Tom Hiddleston, Brie Larson, Samuel L. Jackson, and John Goodman.
See full article at MovieWeb »

Sliff 2016: Tribute to King Kong Nov. 6th – Here’s a Retrospective on the 1933 Original

A Tribute to King Kong takes place as part of the The St. Louis International Film Festival Sunday, Nov. 6 beginning at 6:00pm at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium. The first film screened will be the new documentary Long Live The King, which explores the enduring fascination with one of the biggest stars — both literally and figuratively — in Hollywood history: the mighty King Kong. Produced and directed by Frank Dietz and Trish Geiger, the creative team behind the award-winning “Beast Wishes,” the documentary devotes primary attention to the 1933 classic, celebrating the contributions of filmmakers Merian C. Cooper and Ernest B. Schoedsack, stars Fay Wray, Robert Armstrong, and Bruce Cabot, writer Edgar Wallace, and especially stop-motion innovator Willis O’Brien. But Kong’s legacy is also fully detailed: the sequel “Son of Kong,” the cinematic kin “Mighty Joe Young,” the Dino DeLaurentis and Peter Jackson remakes, even the Japanese versions by Toho Studios.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Sliff 2016 – Tribute To King Kong Nov. 6th – Here are the Top Ten Giant Ape Movies of All Time!

A Tribute to King Kong takes place as part of the The St. Louis International Film Festival Sunday, Nov. 6 beginning at 6:00pm at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium. The first film screened will be the new documentary Long Live The King, which explores the enduring fascination with one of the biggest stars — both literally and figuratively — in Hollywood history: the mighty King Kong. Produced and directed by Frank Dietz and Trish Geiger, the creative team behind the award-winning “Beast Wishes,” the documentary devotes primary attention to the 1933 classic, celebrating the contributions of filmmakers Merian C. Cooper and Ernest B. Schoedsack, stars Fay Wray, Robert Armstrong, and Bruce Cabot, writer Edgar Wallace, and especially stop-motion innovator Willis O’Brien. But Kong’s legacy is also fully detailed: the sequel “Son of Kong,” the cinematic kin “Mighty Joe Young,” the Dino DeLaurentis and Peter Jackson remakes, even the Japanese versions by Toho Studios.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Sliff 2016 – A Tribute to King Kong November 6th Long Live The King and the 1933 Original!

” Throw your arms across your eyes and scream, Ann. Scream for your life!”

Long Live The King and King Kong screen at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium (470 East Lockwood Ave.) Sunday, November 6th beginning at 6pm as part of this year’s St. Louis International Film Festival. The event will be hosted by We Are Movie Geeks own Tom Stockman. Ticket information can be found Here

Sliff bows down to the King — Kong, that is — with a double bill of “Long Live the King” and the 1933 classic that introduced the giant gorilla to the awestruck world at this year’s St. Louis International Film Festival. The event takes place at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium on Sunday November 6th beginning at 6pm.

First up will be the documentary Long Live The King, which explores the enduring fascination with one of the biggest stars in Hollywood history: the mighty King Kong.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Sliff 2016 – The St. Louis International Film Festival Schedule Announced

The schedule for the 25th Annual Whitaker St. Louis International Film Festival (Sliff) has been announced and once again film goers will be offered the best in cutting edge features and shorts from around the globe. The festival takes place November 3-13, 2016.

Sliff kicks off on November 3 with the opening-night selection St. Louis Brews, the latest home-brewed documentary by local filmmaker Bill Streeter, director of Brick By Chance And Fortune: A St. Louis Story (read my interview with Bill Here)

According to Sliff, the festival will feature more than 125 filmmaking guests, including honorees: Actress Karen Allen (Raiders Of The Lost Ark, Animal House), director Charles Burnett (Killer Of Sheep, To Sleep With Anger), winner of the Cinema St. Louis Lifetime Achievement Award; and director Steve James (Hoop Dreams).

Full information on Sliff films, including synopses, dates/time, and links for purchase of advance tickets is available on the Cinema St.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Examining Hollywood Remakes: King Kong

  • Cinelinx
Our series continues with a special installment that compares not just one but Two remakes to a classic original. This week, Cinelinx goes ape and looks at all three versions of King Kong.

King Kong was created in 1933 by Universal Pictures and was the prototype for the Kaiju genre, years before Godzilla ever stomped on Tokyo. The image of Kong atop the Empire State Building is one of the most iconic images in the history of film and pop culture. The first film led to a sequel (the Son of Kong), an animated series, lots of rip-offs (Mighty Joe Young, Konga, A*P*E, the Mighty Peking Man) and years later inspired a pair of remakes (Not counting the campy Kaiju films King Kong vs. Godzilla and King Kong Escapes.) After all these years, Kong remains one of the greatest giant movie monsters of all time. Let’s take a
See full article at Cinelinx »

50 More of the Greatest Matte Paintings of All Time

A few years ago the editors of Shadowlocked asked me to compile a list of what was initially to be, the ten greatest movie matte paintings of all time. A mere ten selections was too slim by a long shot, so my list stretched considerably to twenty, then thirty and finally a nice round fifty entries. Even with that number I found it wasn’t easy to narrow down a suitably wide ranging showcase of motion picture matte art that best represented the artform. So with that in mind, and due to the surprising popularity of that 2012 Shadowlocked list (which is well worth a visit, here Ed), I’ve assembled a further fifty wonderful examples of this vast, vital and more extensively utilised than you’d imagine – though now sadly ‘dead and buried’ – movie magic.

It would of course be so easy to simply concentrate on the well known, iconic,
See full article at Shadowlocked »

DVD Savant 2015 Favored Disc Roundup

or, Savant picks The Most Impressive Discs of 2015

This is the actual view from Savant Central, looking due North.

What a year! I was able to take one very nice trip back East too see Washington D.C. for the first time, or at least as much as two days' walking in the hot sun and then cool rain would allow. Back home in Los Angeles, we've had a year of extreme drought -- my lawn is looking patriotically ratty -- and we're expecting something called El Niño, that's supposed to be just shy of Old-Testament build-me-an-ark intensity. We withstood heat waves like those in Day the Earth Caught Fire, and now we'll get the storms part. This has been a wild year for DVD Savant, which is still a little unsettled. DVDtalk has been very patient and generous, and so have Stuart Galbraith & Joe Dante; so far everything
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

October 27th Blu-ray & DVD Releases Include Army Of Darkness, The Gift, The Fifth Element

  • DailyDead
Hope everyone has their boomsticks ready, as this final week of October is looking to be yet another banner week for genre Blu-ray and DVD releases, highlighted by the anticipated Collector’s Edition set for Sam Raimi’s cult classic Army of Darkness from Scream Factory. The recent thriller, The Gift, is also making its way to multiple formats on October 27th and for those of you fans of The Fifth Element out there, Sony is putting together a nifty Cinema Series release that arrives this Tuesday.

Olive Films is also keeping themselves busy this week with several cult classic releases including Breeders, Sometimes They Come Back, Dr. Terror's House of Horror and Saul BassPhase IV, with Warner Home Video resurrecting several classics in HD as well—The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms, Son of Kong, Them! and the Special Effects Collection box set.

Other notable titles coming out on
See full article at DailyDead »

Randall William Cook: As Never Seen Before, ‘New’ Vintage Stop-Motion on Blu-ray

In honor of Halloween, I once again have a special essay-article up, and this time I can name the contributor. Randall William Cook rates special celebrity status around DVD Savant despite being a friend from way, way back. I hope he's writing a book about his career, because his Hollywood experiences range far afield, from UCLA film school, to acting and directing film and TV, to doing special make-ups, animation direction, front-rank stop motion direction, and second unit direction on big features. Heavily into digital work since the 1990s, Randy supervised character animation and sequence direction for the three Lord of the Rings movies, netting him an amazing three Oscars, three years straight. And he's still the same guy from college -- a new Harryhausen or Welles disc comes out, and he wants to know all about it. Oh, and Cook is a fine writer as well -- as I think this thoughtful piece shows.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Warners’ Special Effects Blu-ray Collection

I'll trade you two RKOs for two Warners', an even swap! This quartet of movie-magic wonderments offer a full course on old-school film effects wizardry at its best. Willis O'Brien passes the baton to disciple Ray Harryhausen, who dazzles us with his own effects magic for the first '50s giant monster epic. And the best monster thriller of the decade is offered at its original widescreen aspect ratio. It's all special enough to merit a mid-week review. Special Effects Collection Blu-ray The Son of Kong, Mighty Joe Young, The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms, Them! Warner Home Video 1933-1954 / B&W / 1:37 Academy - 1:85 widescreen / 335 min. / Street Date October 27, 2015 / 54.96 or 19.98 separately Starring Robert Armstrong, Helen Mack,, Frank Reicher, Victor Wong; Robert Armstrong, Terry Moore, Ben Johnson, Frank McHugh; Paul Christian, Paula Raymond, Cecil Kellaway, Kenneth Tobey, Donald Woods, Lee Van Cleef; James Whitmore, Edmund Gwenn, Joan Weldon, James Arness, Onslow Stevens,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Off The Shelf – Episode 54 – New Releases For The Week Of Tuesday, June 16th 2015

This week on Off The Shelf, Ryan is joined by Brian Saur to take a look at the new DVD and Blu-ray releases for the week of June 16th, 2015, and chat about some follow-up and home video news.

Subscribe in iTunes or RSS.

Episode Links & Notes Follow-up Unopened movies Christopher Lee News Thunderbean: Willie Whopper Blu-ray Pre-order Criterion September Line-up Scream Factory to release Army Of Darkness, Demon Knight and Bordello of Blood Arrow Video: Zardoz, The Mutilator, Requiescant, The Firemen’s Ball, Closely Watched Trains, Hard To Be A God, Society Masters Of Cinema / Eureka: The Skull Warner Bros. Hammer Horror Blu-ray Box Set Warner Bros Special Effects Boxset (Them!, The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms, Son of Kong, Mighty Joe Young) Sony to release The Last Dragon on Blu-ray Scorpion: Burn Witch Burn Kino Cartoon Classics Announced Kl Studio Classics F/X 2 and The Challenge Universal to put out
See full article at CriterionCast »

Hammer Horror Classics Volume One Blu-ray Collection Announced

Though Sir Christopher Lee sadly passed away, his work will live on forever. In a new Blu-ray set, Warner Archive is preserving three Lee-starring Hammer horror movies: Dracula Has Risen From The Grave, The Mummy, and Taste the Blood of Dracula.

Blu-ray.com reports that Warner Archive's Horror Classics Volume One Blu-ray collection will hit shelves this fall (October 6th, according to Home Theater Forum). The collection includes four Hammer films: Dracula Has Risen From The Grave (1968), The Mummy (1959), Taste the Blood of Dracula (1970), and Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed (1969).

In addition to the Horror Classics Volume One, Warner Archive will also release the Special Effects Collection Volume One, a sci-fi / adventure Blu-ray set comprising Son of Kong, Mighty Joe Young, Beast From 20,000 Fathoms, and Them!

It's estimated that both collections will be priced at $54.96 apiece and released in early October, and it's even believed that the titles will be sold separately,
See full article at DailyDead »
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