Rufus Jones, a black child, is elected President of the United States in this short musical comedy. The film features song and dance numbers by a seven year old Sammy Davis Jr..

Director:

Writers:

(story), (story)
Reviews

On Disc

at Amazon

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
Mother of Rufus Jones
...
Rufus Jones (as Sammy Davis)
Hamtree Harrington
Dusty Fletcher
Edgar Connor
The Will Vodery Girls ...
Dancing Ensemble
Russell Wooding ...
Leader of Vocal Ensemble
The Russell Wooding's Jubilee Singers ...
Vocal Ensemble
Edit

Storyline

Rufus Jones, a black child, is elected President of the United States in this short musical comedy. The film features song and dance numbers by a seven year old Sammy Davis Jr.. Written by Thomas McWilliams <tgm@netcom.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy | Musical | Short

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

9 September 1933 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Broadway Brevities (1933-1934 season) #2: Rufus Jones for President  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Vitaphone production reels #1553-1554. See more »

Connections

Featured in That's Black Entertainment (1990) See more »

Soundtracks

(I'll Be Glad When You're Dead) You Rascal You
(uncredited)
Written by Spo-De-Odee
Performed by Sammy Davis Jr.
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Judge the movie in the context of its time, not yours
2 November 2008 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

I turned this on to see the incredible Ethel Waters, whose autobiography I am now reading. I'll admit my jaw dropped when the pork chops and watermelon references started rolling in, but people cannot look at this movie as a stereotypical or racist piece. It's pretty much a short film made by blacks, for blacks at a time when the entertainment industry was quite segregated and the stereotypes to the people involved were the jokes of their time, old trends exaggerated for humor. We see modern black movies do the same thing, but with the new trends (stereotypes), "ho's" and the "hood" and such. I think if you look back in eighty years, you would find today's movies will look just as racist. What viewers should appreciate about this film is the talent of Waters and the pint-sized Sammy Davis Jr., who out taps his contemporary, Shirley Temple, and looks remarkably the same facially as he did as an adult. Everyone involved in this film clearly had a lot of fun making it. Why not enjoy it for what it is, instead of what you think it should have been?


5 of 6 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Discuss Rufus Jones for President (1933) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?