Rufus Jones, a black child, is elected president of the USA in this short musical comedy. Features song and dance numbers by a seven year old 'Sammy Davis Jr.'.

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(story), (story)
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
Mother of Rufus Jones
...
Rufus Jones (as Sammy Davis)
Hamtree Harrington
Dusty Fletcher
Edgar Connor
The Will Vodery Girls ...
Dancing Ensemble
Russell Wooding ...
Leader of Vocal Ensemble
The Russell Wooding's Jubilee Singers ...
Vocal Ensemble
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Storyline

Rufus Jones, a black child, is elected president of the USA in this short musical comedy. Features song and dance numbers by a seven year old 'Sammy Davis Jr.'. Written by Thomas McWilliams <tgm@netcom.com>

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Genres:

Comedy | Musical | Short

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Details

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Release Date:

9 September 1933 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Broadway Brevities (1933-1934 season) #2: Rufus Jones for President  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

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Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Vitaphone production reels #1553-1554. See more »

Connections

Featured in That's Dancing! (1985) See more »

Soundtracks

Underneath the Harlem Moon
(uncredited)
Music by Harry Revel
Lyrics by Mack Gordon
Performed by Ethel Waters
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User Reviews

 
Despite stereotypes, Rufus Jones for President is worthy for Waters and a very young Davis
8 February 2008 | by (Baton Rouge, La.) – See all my reviews

Well, if it weren't for Ethel Waters and a 7-year-old Sammy Davis, Jr. (here billed without the Jr.), Rufus Jones for President would be one of the worst representations of African-American stereotypes I've seen from the early talkie era and wouldn't have been worth seeing because of that. Ms. Waters is excellent here singing "Am I Blue?" and "Underneath Our Harlem Moon" while Mr. Davis shows us how his childhood experience in showbiz prepared him for his superstar status as an adult. He's so good tap-dancing here that for awhile I thought he was a little person with decades of experience. So if you're willing to ignore the negative connotations here, Rufus Jones for President should provide some good enjoyment. P.S. This marks the fourth time today I've seen and heard the song, "I'll Be Glad When You're Dead You Rascal You" performed on film, this time by Davis. Must have been a very popular song about this time.


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