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The Private Life of Henry VIII. (1933) Poster

Trivia

Because of the memorable banquet scene, Charles Laughton for many years thereafter was often given a free roasted chicken, without utensils, by restaurant owners who thought it was a good joke.
First non-US film to receive a Best Picture Oscar nomination
According to Binnie Barnes, Charles Laughton was a method actor, and when Wendy Barrie giggled during a scene to the actor's aggravation, he bit her on the arm, breaking her skin, exactly as the real Henry often did when angry with his wives.
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Charles Laughton (Henry VIII) and Elsa Lanchester (Anne of Cleves) were married in real life.
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Marks British cinema's first Academy Award.
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The failure of the original copyright holder to renew the film's copyright resulted in it falling into public domain, meaning that virtually anyone could duplicate and sell a VHS/DVD copy of the film. Therefore, many of the versions of this film available on the market are either severely (and usually badly) edited and/or of extremely poor quality, having been duped from second- or third-generation (or more) copies of the film.
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At the time, period films were considered to be box office poison, so Alexander Korda found it to be a real struggle raising the £60,000 necessary.
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The film's success enabled Alexander Korda to establish London Films.
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While he was on a tour of Europe, American professional wrestler Man Mountain Dean was hired to be Charles Laughton's uncredited stunt double. This would be the first of Dean's appearances in motion pictures.
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Because of the film's modest budget, director Alexander Korda had to shoot on actual locations instead of the studio. Some sets were half-built out of necessity, so if an actor moved off his mark, the slats would show the sides.
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After meeting Merle Oberon when she came to Hollywood, Rouben Mamoulian remarked about her role, " I don't think in the history of the theater or the movies, has such a small part made such a great impression."
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Charles Laughton and his co-stars were asked to defer their fees until after the premiere.
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Set designer Vincent Korda spoke no English whatever, and the film's British crew spoke no Hungarian, so all of the film's sets were constructed via sign language between Korda and the crew.
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Stunned by Merle Oberon's radiant beauty in "The Private Life of Henry VIII," director William Wyler recommended to his cousin Carl Laemmle to sign her. Months later Wyler discovered that Universal had taken his advice but mistakenly signed Binnie Barnes.
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This film inaugurated the first syndicated television presentation of a package of major studio feature films on USA television; it premiered in New York City Sunday 11 July 1948 on WPIX (Channel 11); in Los Angeles, it received its initial television showing Sunday 19 December 1948 on KTLA (Channel 5). The package consisted of 24 Alexander Korda productions originally released theatrically between 1933 and 1942.
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Richard Burton was also nominated for playing King Henry VIII in Anne of the Thousand Days (1969). Judi Dench and Cate Blanchett would both receive Oscar nominations for playing his daughter, Queen Elizabeth I, which Dench won.
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At the time of its 1947 USA re-release, this film was most often paired with the re-release of _Catherine the Great (1934)_ sharing the lower half of the double bill.
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