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A Gentle Giant in Captivity - An Interview with Derek Schulman

Recently, Dusty provided me a golden opportunity: in connection with the release of Three-Piece Suite -- a remastering of some compositions from Gentle Giant's first three albums -- their media team offered an interview with Derek Schulman, lead singer for the group, and now a high-level record company executive. Knowing my love of Gentle Giant, Dusty offered the interview to me. There was no constraint on content, only on the number of questions (an even dozen). So, with thanks to Anne Leighton (of Anne Leighton Media), who coordinated, here is my interview with one of progressive rock's most iconic figures, both as an artist and as a rep:

1. There has been a sort of minor resurgence of things Gentle Giant, including the induction of the band into the Portsmouth Hall of Fame, and the imminent release of Three-Piece Suite, a collection of compositions from the first three Gentle Giant albums,
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Venice Classics to include 21 restorations

  • ScreenDaily
Akahige, Amarcord, Aleksandr Nevskij among Venice Classics titles; Bertrand Tavernier selects four films.

Akahige, Amarcord, Aleksandr Nevskij and A Matter of Life and Death are among 21 titles announced today to screen in Venice’s (September 2-12) Classics section, which will reveal further titles later this month.

Director Bertrand Tavernier, who is to receive the Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement award, has selected and will present four films for the Classics strand: Pattes Blances (White Paws) by Jean Grémillion, La Lupa (The Vixen) by Alberto Lattuada, Sonnenstrahl (Ray of Sunshine) by Pál Fejös and A Matter of Life and Death by Michael Powell and Eric Pressburger.

The 21 restorations:

Akahige (Red Beard) by Akira Kurosawa (Japan, 1965, 185’, B&W), restoration by Tōhō Co., Ltd.

Aleksandr Nevskij (Alexander Nevsky) by Sergej Michajlovič Ėjzenštejn (Ussr, 1938, 108’, B&W), restoration by Mosfilm

Amarcord by Federico Fellini (Italy, 1973, 123’, Color) restoration by Cineteca di Bologna with the support of yoox.com and the
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Kael Vs. Kane: Pauline Kael, Orson Welles and the Authorship of Citizen Kane

Part I.

In 1963, Film Quarterly published an essay entitled “Circles and Squares.” It addressed the French auteur theory, introduced to America by The Village Voice’s Andrew Sarris. Auteurism holds that a film’s primary creator is its director; Sarris’s “Notes on the Auteur Theory” further distinguished auteurs as filmmakers with distinct, recurring styles. Challenging him was a California-based writer named Pauline Kael.

Kael attacked Sarris’s obsession with trivial links between filmmaker’s movies, whether repeated shots or thematic preoccupations. This led critics to overpraise directors’ lesser films, as when Jacques Rivette declared Howard HawksMonkey Business a masterpiece. “It is an insult to an artist to praise his bad work along with his good; it indicates that you are incapable of judging either,” Kael wrote.

She criticized auteurist preoccupation with Hawks and Alfred Hitchcock, claiming critics “work embarrassingly hard trying to give some semblance of intellectual respectability to mindless,
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Bravo Developing Scripted Projects with Paul Adelstein, Gale Anne Hurd (Exclusive)

Bravo Developing Scripted Projects with Paul Adelstein, Gale Anne Hurd (Exclusive)
Bravo is expanding its scripted slate with three development prospects, Variety has learned, including a new project from “Girlfriends’ Guide to Divorce” star Paul Adelstein and a 1980s period drama from “Walking Dead” producer Gale Anne Hurd.

The ramp-up of scripted development comes ahead of the premiere of Bravo’s second scripted series and first half-hour scripted comedy, “Odd Mom Out,” which premieres this summer on June 8.

Adelstein brings dark comedy “My So Called Wife” to the net’s development slate, as co-writer, along with “Girlfriends’ Guide” director Adam Brooks (“Definitely Maybe, Wimbledon”).

The Universal Cable Productions’ project follows a female con artist who gets men to fall in love with her, marries them and then disappears with their money and just enough dirty inside information to guarantee they will never go to the police.

The cabler also has “White Collar Wives” in development. Written by Vanessa Reisen (”Extant,”“Weeds
See full article at Variety - TV News »

'Willy Wonka,' 'Saving Private Ryan,' 'Big Lebowski' added to National Film Registry

  • Hitfix
'Willy Wonka,' 'Saving Private Ryan,' 'Big Lebowski' added to National Film Registry
Each year, the Library of Congress selects 25 films to be named to the National Film Registry, a proclamation of commitment to preserving the chosen pictures for all time. They can be big studio pictures or experimental short films, goofball comedies or poetic meditations on life. The National Film Registery "showcases the extraordinary diversity of America’s film heritage and the disparate strands making it so vibrant" and by preserving the films, the Library of Congress hopes to "a crucial element of American creativity, culture and history.” This year’s selections span the period 1913 to 2004 and include a number of films you’re familiar with. Unless you’ve never heard of "Saving Private Ryan," "The Big Lebowski," “Rosemary’s Baby” or "Ferris Bueller's Day Off." Highlights from the list include the aforementioned film, Arthur Penn’s Western "Little Big Man," John Lasseter’s 1986 animated film, “Luxo Jr.," 1953’s “House of Wax,
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‘Saving Private Ryan’, ‘Ferris Bueller’ & More Added To National Film Registry

  • Deadline
‘Saving Private Ryan’, ‘Ferris Bueller’ & More Added To National Film Registry
Spanning the years 1913-2004, the 25 films to be added to the Library of Congress’ National Film Registry for 2014 include Steven Spielberg’s Saving Private Ryan, Roman Polanski’s Rosemary’s Baby, Arthur Penn’s Little Big Man, John Hughes’ Ferris Bueller’s Day Off and the Coen brothers’ The Big Lebowski. The annual selection helps to ensure that the movies will be preserved for all time. This year’s list brings the number of films in the registry to 650.

Also on the list are John Lasseter’s 1986 animated film, Luxo Jr; the original Willy Wonka And The Chocolate Factory with Gene Wilder; and Howard Hawks’ classic 1959 Western Rio Bravo. Documentaries and silent films also make up part of the selection which represents titles that are “culturally, historically or aesthetically” significant; they must also each be at least 10 years old. Check out the rundown of all 25 movies below:

2014 National Film Registry
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‘Big Lebowski,’ ‘Willy Wonka’ Among National Film Registry’s 25 Selections

‘Big Lebowski,’ ‘Willy Wonka’ Among National Film Registry’s 25 Selections
The Big Lebowski,” “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off,” “Rosemary’s Baby,” “Saving Private Ryan” and “Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory” are among the 25 films saluted by the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress in the organization’s annual selection of notable works.

The org says selection will help ensure preservation of these films. This year’s choices bring the registry total to 650, a small fraction of the Library’s vast collection of 1.3 million items. As always, the choices are eclectic, including Hollywood films, indies, documentaries, silent movies and student films.

“The National Film Registry showcases the extraordinary diversity of America’s film heritage and the disparate strands making it so vibrant,” said the Librarian of Congress James H. Billington. “By preserving these films, we protect a crucial element of American creativity, culture and history.”

Under the terms of the National Film Preservation Act, each year the Librarian
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Big Lebowski Among Those Selected For The National Film Registry

The Big Lebowski Among Those Selected For The National Film Registry
As we rush towards Christmas, the speed of news from Hollywood and beyond begins to slow. But there are some traditions that still happen around this time of year, and one of them is the list of films submitted for preservation by America’s National Film Registry. Amongst them this year? The Big Lebowski, Ferris Bueller’s Day Off and Rio Bravo.Steven Spielberg sees a fifth film – Saving Private Ryan – admitted this year, while horror thrillers House Of Wax and Rosemary’s Baby have both scared up a place in the Library of Congress.Also this year, Luxor Jr., which helped usher in Pixar, has made the cut, alongside 1917’s silent-era short Unmasked. Preston SturgesThe Power And The Glory won a place with State Fair, Ruggles Of Red Gap, Down Argentine Way, 1919’s The Dragon Painter, Felicia from 1965, The Gang’s All Here (1943), the affective Into The Arms Of Strangers: Stories Of The Kindertransport
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WWE: Why WrestleMania 7 Is Secretly The Best WrestleMania Of All Time

When many people think of the great WrestleManias, a select number of events tend to pop up in the mind of most fans. WrestleMania X7 is probably the best WrestleMania of all time and a candidate for the best American wrestling PPV of all time. WrestleMania III is up there thanks to the spectacle of the Silverdome and a rather great event overall. That’s fine and dandy, but I’m going to throw a different WrestleMania into the mix. WrestleMania VII may be the best WrestleMania that nobody talks about.

First, let’s address the elephant in the room and one of the main reasons that most fans tend to shy away from WrestleMania: Gulfsploitation. I don’t even know if that is a word, but that is probably the best name for it. Taking Sgt. Slaughter who at that point had been portrayed as an American hero
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Me and Lou

Not that Lou Reed would have recognized me (though I was introduced to him once, which I'll get to), but he and his body of work intersected my life in more personal ways than that of any other major rock star. So this isn't an obituary so much as a series of memories. For obituaries, check out Gary Graff in Billboard and Jon Dolan in Rolling Stone.

Lou was from Long Island and I was from Long Island. At the most basic level, this meant that, growing up listening to Long Island radio stations, I heard lots of Lou even when he was no longer especially fashionable (between about 1976 and 1981). Thus, while most of the world ignored his 1978 album Street Hassle, I heard much of it on Wlir and Wbab, and bought it – my first Lou album. He had started out underground in the Velvet Underground, had managed to claw
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