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Laughter in Hell (1933) Poster

Trivia

Features a graphic lynching scene which was very upsetting to many viewers, and to African Americans especially. There were some, however, who felt it a bold statement against race crimes which were still being committed in some parts of the United States.
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This obscure film was thought to be lost for many years until a complete print was found in mid-2012 and was screened at the Egyptian Theater in Hollywood, California, on October 10, 2012.
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John Ford was originally set to direct the film.
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Jim Tully was reportedly very unhappy with the final version of the film.
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Almost no production stills survive from this film. When the American Cinematheque added the film to their October, 2012, list of screenings, they could find only one behind-the-scenes photograph to use as an illustration for their brochure.
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In an April 21st, 1932 article for the Milwaukee Sentinal (written by Eileen Percy ), it was announced that Charles Bickford would be playing the lead role in this film. The role was eventually played by Pat O'Brien.
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Louella Parsons announced Universal Pictures' purchase of the Laughter in Hell film rights on March 22, 1932, and also announced that Victor McLaglen would play the lead.
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Universal Pictures production number 607.
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Jim Tully's novel was still unpublished when this film went into production.
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According to an article in the Baltimore Afro-American, Clarence Muse was signed for the role of Abraham Jackson on October 22, 1932.
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