Lady for a Day (1933) - News Poster

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Oscars 2017: seven talking points

  • ScreenDaily
Oscars 2017: seven talking points
From Mahershala Ali to Janet Patterson - Screen runs through some of the buzz topics from last night’s Academy Awards.Best Picture

The presentation of best picture at the Academy Awards is arguably the biggest single moment in Hollywood’s calendar, making it all the more remarkable that through a clumsy series of envelope errors, the ceremony managed to temporarily crown La La Land before that film’s producer Jordan Horowitz announced that Moonlight was in fact the winner. Accounting firm PricewaterhouseCoopers has since taken the blame.

Echoing the notorious blunder at the 2015 Miss Universe pageant – when presenter Steve Harvey announced the wrong winner (which Oscars host Jimmy Kimmel alluded to by joking “personally, I blame Steve Harvey for this”) – the magnitude of the blunder is unparralleled in Oscar terms but not entirely without precedent.

At the 1934 Oscars Frank Capra took to stage thinking he had won best director for Lady For A Day when he heard
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It’s official, the best Oscar year ever is… – watch Jump Cut #4

This week’s Jump Cut is all about determining the best year ever in cinema.

“But how can you figure that out?!” you shout at whatever device you’re reading this on. “Film is too subjective an art form for you to make overarching statements like that!”

That’s a very good point, but you’re overlooking two things: 1) the Oscar best picture nominations, and 2) film ratings on the Internet Movie Database. Both obviously have degrees of subjectivity, but that’s levelled off somewhat with each institution’s sheer number of voters or raters.

So, to work out what year was the best ever for cinema, we’ve taken all the films nominated for each year’s Best Picture Oscar, and then worked out their average IMDb rating. I’ll just point out that these were the ratings as of the week of the 88th Academy Awards on 22nd February
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

‘Mad Max: Fury Road’ Hopes to Join Long Legacy of Aussies at the Oscars

By Patrick Shanley

Managing Editor

With Mad Max: Fury Road in a great position to earn the most Oscar nomination of any film this year when the Academy announces its nominations this Thursday, director George Miller and crew look to join the long legacy of Aussies at the Oscars.

In addition to Miller, the film’s producer Doug Mitchell, co-writer Nico Lathouris, and cinematographer John Clement Seale all hail from the land down under and have high Oscar hopes when nominations are announced this Thursday as the film has been a massive success with critics and audiences alike and earned two Golden Globe nominations for best picture and best director.

Miller and company would hardly be the first Aussies to be noticed by the Academy. Massive stars such as Russell Crowe, Nicole Kidman, and Cate Blanchett all call Australia home and have taken home Oscars, and Blanchett seems likely to
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

Warren William—On The Air

People who discover the provocative pre-Code movies made in the early 1930s inevitably become fans of leading man Warren William, an urbane actor (sometimes referred to as the poor man’s John Barrymore) who starred in so many memorable films of that period: Beauty and the Boss, Skyscraper Souls, The Mouthpiece, Employees Entrance, The Dark Horse, Three on a Match, The Match King, and many more. He also gave fine performances as Dave the Dude in Frank Capra’s Lady for a Day and served Cecil B. DeMille well as Julius Caesar in Cleopatra. He played a number of prominent detectives including Philo Vance and lawyer/sleuth Perry Mason before starring in his own B movie series as The ...

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See full article at Leonard Maltin's Movie Crazy »

The Birds, Inglourious Basterds Actor Taylor Dead at 84

Rod Taylor dead at 84: Actor best known for 'The Time Machine' and 'The Birds' Rod Taylor, best remembered for the early 1960s movies The Time Machine and The Birds, and for his supporting role as Winston Churchill in Quentin Tarantino's international hit Inglourious Basterds, has died. Taylor suffered a heart attack at his Los Angeles home earlier this morning (January 8, 2015). Born on January 11, 1930, in Sydney, he would have turned 85 on Sunday. Based on H.G. Wells' classic 1895 sci-fi novel, The Time Machine stars Rod Taylor as a H. George Wells, an inventor who comes up with an intricate chair that allows him to travel across time. (In the novel, the Victorian protagonist is referred to simply as the "Time Traveller.") After experiencing World War I and World War II, Wells decides to fast forward to the distant future, ultimately arriving at a place where humankind has been split
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

David O. Russell’s Hot Streak

By Mark Pinkert

Contributor



If David O. Russell gets nominated for Best Director this year, he will have accomplished something that Martin Scorsese, Woody Allen, Alfred Hitchcock, Francis Ford Coppola and many other great directors have not–that is, to earn three Best Director nominations in the span of only four years. In fact, only eleven other directors have been on comparable hot streaks in Academy Award history, and only one of those streaks (by Clint Eastwood) has occurred after 1960. (See below for reference.)

This is not a comparison of overall quality or career prolificity (not many can bout with Scorsese, Allen, Hitchcock and Coppola in those categories), but merely a tribute to Russell’s ultra-concentrated efforts in the past four years and a recognition of the difficulty of this feat. It’s also a relevant because it might shed some light on previous Oscar trends and on what we
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

Capra-Corn in Austin, Texas

I just returned from Austin, Texas, where I had the pleasure of presenting Frank Capra’s Lady for a Day (1933) to an enthusiastic audience at the historic Paramount Theatre, as part of its annual Summer Film Classics series. The evening was made even nicer for me by my old friend Louis Black, editor and co-publisher of the Austin Chronicle, who brought me onstage with a beautiful introduction. Then film programmer Stephen Jannise, who interviewed me after the picture, as we both fought back tears from watching the final scene of Capra’s beautiful movie. What impressed me most was how perfectly Capra’s finely-tuned picture still worked with an audience, eliciting every laugh that ...

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See full article at Leonard Maltin's Movie Crazy »

Leonard Maltin and 'Lady For a Day' at the Paramount

  • Slackerwood
Tickets are currently on sale for a special screening of Frank Capra's 1933 film Lady for a Day at the Paramount. On hand to introduce the movie, and to talk more about classic films in general, will be film critic and historian Leonard Maltin. Maltin was one of the proponents for making this movie available on Blu-ray, and the event will include a rare 35mm projection of the classic, thanks to a loan from the Capra estate.

Lady for a Day is early Capra, made before he really burst on the scene with his big hit It Happened One Night. It's adapted from a Damon Runyon story by Robert Riskin, who continued to team up with Capra on many other movies in the 1930s and early 1940s.

The movie stars May Robson (whom I know best for her role as the daunting Aunt Elizabeth/Mrs. Carlton-Random in my favorite Bringing Up Baby) as Apple Annie,
See full article at Slackerwood »

Movie Poster of the Week: “Lady for a Day” and the Posters of 1933

  • MUBI
As any New York cinephile knows, Film Forum is in the middle of a four-week, 66-film retrospective devoted to what Dave Kehr in The New York Times called “the last full year of unbridled Hollywood filmmaking before the Code,” or what Film Forum is trumpeting as “Hollywood’s Naughtiest, Bawdiest Year.”

I’ve written about pre-Code posters before, but 1933 as a whole offers more than just silk robes and daringly revealed flesh. I’ve gathered as many posters, inserts and window cards as I could for the films programmed in the series, sticking with American posters (though there are some stunning European variations on these, like this Swedish Hold Your Man) and American films (though Bruce Goldstein has also programmed a handful of foreign titles). The quality of draughtsmanship varies wildly, with the poster for Frank Capra’s Lady for a Day, above, among the finest. But for me the
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Emmanuelle Riva: The True Sleeper Nominee Of Oscar Night?

By Joey Magidson

Film Contributor

***

We’ve been paying a lot of attention to Argo of late in regard to the Oscars, but there are some big races that don’t involve Ben Affleck’s film. Most notably, there’s a competitive Best Actress race going on.

Many pundits have made it out to be a competition between Jessica Chastain and Jennifer Lawrence, with the latter far out in the lead. While I agree that the Silver Linings Playbook actress is certainly ahead of her Zero Dark Thirty competitor, I do think she has to watch out for Emmanuelle Riva in her rear-view mirror. The sleeper candidate from Amour may just wake everyone up on Oscar night and steal the trophy.

Riva is immensely deserving of her nomination, but up until recently, it didn’t seem like many thought she had a legitimate shot at a win. I’ll confess
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

A Capra Classic Made Whole

A year before It Happened One Night famously swept the Oscars, Frank Capra and screenwriter Robert Riskin made Lady for a Day, which earned four Academy Award nominations, including Best Picture—but because it was withheld from TV and 16mm distribution for years, it never attained the widespread awareness and residual affection that other Capra classics have always enjoyed. A new, beautifully restored DVD and Blu-ray from Inception Media—with a sequence that was missing from an earlier dvd release—may help to remedy that injustice. Oddly enough, it was Capra himself who pulled Lady for a Day from circulation, so that it wouldn’t be compared to his 1961 remake,...

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See full article at Leonard Maltin's Movie Crazy »

DVD Blu-Ray, March 20: 'The Muppets,' 'The Girl With a Dragon Tattoo,' 'Hop'

  • Moviefone
Moviefone's Pick of the Week "The Muppets" What's It About? Kermit, Miss Piggy, Fonzie and the entire gang (even Gonzo) are reunited by their number one superfan, Walter, in an effort to save the beloved "Muppet Show" Theater. See It Because: It's really enjoyable. It's really easy to be cautious about a new Muppet movie that doesn't involve Jim Henson, but Jason Segel and the creative team approached the project with a lot of reverence for the classic Muppet bits. It pays loving tribute while also setting them up for new adventures Also Available on Redbox DVD & Blu-ray | Amazon Instant Video New on DVD & Blu-ray "Carnage" Roman Polanski adapts the hit cross-continental play about two sets of parents that get together to discuss their children's schoolyard fight; with a cast featuring Kate Winslet, Jodie Foster, John C. Reilly and Christoph Waltz, it's a superbly-acted production, but "Carnage's" broad, theatrical
See full article at Moviefone »

Peter Falk obituary

Us actor whose success as the scruffy TV detective Columbo was complemented by a wide range of stage and screen roles

Show-business history records that the American actor Peter Falk, who has died aged 83, made his stage debut the year before he left high school, presciently cast as a detective. Despite the 17-year-old's fleeting success, he had no thoughts of pursuing acting as a career – if only because tough kids from the Bronx considered it an unsuitable job for a man. Just 24 years later, Falk made his first television appearance as the scruffy detective, Columbo, not only becoming the highest paid actor on television – commanding $500,000 an episode during the 1970s – but also the most famous.

Inevitably the lieutenant dedicated to unravelling the villainy of the wealthy and glamorous dominated his career, although – unlike some actors – he escaped the straitjacket, or in his case shabby raincoat, of typecasting. In addition to stage work,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Peter Falk obituary

Us actor whose success as the scruffy TV detective Columbo was complemented by a wide range of stage and screen roles

Show-business history records that the American actor Peter Falk, who has died aged 83, made his stage debut the year before he left high school, presciently cast as a detective. Despite the 17-year-old's fleeting success, he had no thoughts of pursuing acting as a career – if only because tough kids from the Bronx considered it an unsuitable job for a man. Just 24 years later, Falk made his first television appearance as the scruffy detective, Columbo, not only becoming the highest paid actor on television – commanding $500,000 an episode during the 1970s – but also the most famous.

Inevitably the lieutenant dedicated to unravelling the villainy of the wealthy and glamorous dominated his career, although – unlike some actors – he escaped the straitjacket, or in his case shabby raincoat, of typecasting. In addition to stage work,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Peter Falk Dead at 83: Columbo, A Woman Under The Influence

Peter Falk Peter Falk, the two-time Oscar nominee best known for playing television police detective Columbo, died Thursday, June 23, at his Beverly Hills home. Falk, who had been suffering from dementia (apparently a consequence of Alzheimer's disease), was 83. Falk's two Oscar nods, both in the Best Supporting Actor category, came back-to-back in the early '60s: as a cold-blooded hitman in Burt Balaban and Stuart Rosenberg's 1960 crime drama Murder, Inc., and as a typical Damon Runyon underworld character — named Joy Boy — in Frank Capra's dismal 1961 remake of his own Lady for a Day, Pocketful of Miracles. Among Falk's other notable film roles are those in two John Cassavetes movies: the very, very, very long 1970 drama Husbands, co-starring Ben Gazzara and Cassavetes himself, and the director' biggest box-office hit, the 1974 release A Woman Under the Influence, co-starring Gena Rowlands as the mentally unbalanced title character. In the film, which many consider Cassavetes' best work,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Singh is Kinng taken to court

A case has been filed by American Rights Management Company against Vipul Shah’s Singh is Kinng on grounds of copyright infringement. This comes two years after the films theatrical release.

The comedy film starred Akshay Kumar and Katrina Kaif with a musical score by Us rapper, Snoop Dogg.

Filed in New York District Court, the lawsuit claims that the movie has been ‘derived’ from Daman Runyon’s short story, Madame La Gimp (1929). It also states that the film was ‘derived’ from Lady for a Day, A Pocket Full of Miracles and Miracles, all of which are derivatives of the original Madame La Gimp story.

Commenting on the issue, Vipul Shah says that he has seen A Pocketful of Miracles and another film based on the story and sees no relevance between the two. He went on to say that the script and story of the film was written by
See full article at Bollyspice »

Catch Oscar Fever With TCM’s ‘31 Days Of Oscar’

While you’re already getting your big Academy Awards party ready in time for the telecast on March 7th, we’ve got something for even bigger movie fans to enjoy. Of course, we’re talking about a movie marathon!

All month long, Turner Classic Movies will be running over 360 Academy Award nominated and winning films, back to back, with an interesting twist. In the vain of the game “Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon,” each film will have a common actor or actress from the previous film.

For example, tomorrow night’s schedule consists of The Graduate with Anne Bancroft and William Daniels, which goes into Reds which stars Daniels and Jack Nicholson, into Chinatown with Nicholson and John Huston. Though we’re already about two weeks into the marathon, there are still plenty of great films to look forward to, including some TCM firsts like Gladiator, Titanic, Alien, and Trading Places.
See full article at The Flickcast »

Funny Games

Funny Games
By now the phenomenon of a director remaking one of his own movies is hardly novel.

Alfred Hitchcock made two versions of The Man Who Knew Too Much, and Frank Capra turned Lady for a Day into the more lavish Pocketful of Miracles.

There even are cases of foreign directors helming the American remakes of their own hit movies. Francis Veber directed both the original French version of Les Fugitifs and the Hollywood version, Three Fugitives, with Nick Nolte and Martin Short.

But I'm not sure there has ever been anything comparable to the new version of Funny Games, in which Austrian director Michael Haneke has produced a shot-for-shot replica of his 1997 German-language movie.

Some will question whether we needed even one version of this unsavory story. No doubt Haneke would argue that the original had such a limited audience in America that a remake starring Oscar nominees Naomi Watts and Tim Roth, along with Michael Pitt, will bring the story to lots of new viewers. But does this exercise in sadism and psychological torture deserve a larger audience, or any audience at all?

That point will be argued by critics, though there's no disputing the fact that this film, like the original, is compelling and exceptionally well acted. It probably will develop a cult following, like all of Haneke's work.

Ann (Watts), her husband George (Roth), and their son Georgie (Devon Gearhart) arrive at their secluded vacation home on Long Island in the movie's opening scene. As they are settling in, they are greeted by two polite but slightly creepy young men (Pitt, Brady Corbet), who claim to be visiting one of their neighbors and need to borrow some eggs.

The interlopers, who call themselves Paul and Peter, quickly insinuate themselves into the household, incapacitate George, and hold the family captive as they initiate a series of increasingly sadistic games. The tension mounts as Georgie and Ann try to escape, which only stokes the cruelty of their captors. Haneke keeps the most horrific violence offscreen, but that does not mute the impact of these degrading and ruthless exercises.

Viewers who hope to glean some sociological or psychological insights will be disappointed. At one point Paul gives a lengthy, completely fictitious profile of his cohort, just to mock those who seek an explanation for such violent antisocial behavior. The two boys dressed in white are meant to be evil incarnate -- motiveless, unfathomable, inescapable.

The only comprehensible comment that the film makes is about itself and the role of cinema in encouraging voyeurism and tolerance for violence. (This theme also was at the heart of Haneke's most acclaimed film, Cache.)

There's an intriguing moment, identical in both the Austrian and American films, in which Paul uses a TV remote control to rewind the action we have seen and replay a different version. Even though the director might want us to contemplate the audience's role in sanctioning violence, he can't escape the whiff of exploitation that infects both movies.

Still, this version, like the earlier one, is skillfully executed. Roth doesn't match the gravitas of the late Ulrich Muhe, who played the husband in the 1997 film, but he's affecting. Watts is superb in conveying the emotional anguish of her character. Pitt demonstrates his versatility with an electrifying portrayal of the sinister, soulless Paul. The only weak link in the cast is Corbet, who was convincing in more sympathetic roles in "thirteen" and Mysterious Skin, but doesn't exude enough menace as Pitt's baby-faced accomplice.

Cinematographer Darius Khondji gives an ominous edge to the sun-dappled locations, which look remarkably like the settings in the European film. Even the music selections are virtually identical in the two films. Perhaps the best way to appreciate the picture, its few intellectual pretensions notwithstanding, is as a classy horror film with a particularly nasty edge. It's not exactly entertainment, but it casts a poisonous spell.

FUNNY GAMES U.S.

Warner Independent Pictures

Celluloid Dreams, Halcyon Pictures, Tartan Films, X-Filme International

Credits:

Screenwriter-director: Michael Haneke

Producers: Chris Coen, Hamish McAlpine, Hengameh Panahi, Christian Baute, Andro Steinborn

Executive producers: Naomi Watts, Philippe Aigle, Carole Siller, Douglas Steiner

Director of photography: Darius Khondji

Production designer: Kevin Thompson

Co-producers: Andrea Occhipinti, Rene Bastian, Linda Moran, Adam Brightman, Jonathan Schwartz

Costume designer: David Robinson

Editor: Monika Willi

Cast:

Ann: Naomi Watts

George: Tim Roth

Paul: Michael Pitt

Peter: Brady Corbet

Georgie: Devon Gearhart

Fred: Boyd Gaines

Betsy: Siobhan Fallon Hogan

Running time -- 110 minutes

MPAA rating: R

See also

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