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Hold the Press (1933)

Passed  -  Crime | Mystery | Romance  -  25 October 1933 (USA)
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When newspaper reporter Tim Collins, of the "Post", is slugged while investigating the shooting of a big-time gambler, he sets out to get his man with such determination that he ends up in ... See full summary »

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Cast

Cast overview:
...
Shirley Grey ...
Wheeler Oakman ...
Hugh Abbott
Henry Wadsworth ...
Frankie White
Oscar Apfel ...
Mr. Bishop - Managing Editor
Bradley Page ...
Mike Serrano
Jack Long ...
Ike Grimby
Samuel S. Hinds ...
R.T. Taylor (as Samuel Hinds)
Joseph Crehan ...
Chief of Detectives Patrick Brennan
Edward LeSaint ...
Judge O'Neill (as Ed LeSaint)
Julian Rivero ...
Henry Gross
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Storyline

When newspaper reporter Tim Collins, of the "Post", is slugged while investigating the shooting of a big-time gambler, he sets out to get his man with such determination that he ends up in jail. There, he discovers a "parole racket" which involves a crooked politician, and he faces death to get the story for his paper. Written by Les Adams <longhorn1939@suddenlink.net>

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A NEWSPAPER REPORTER BRAVES THE WRATH OF POLITICIANS, GANGSTERS AND GUNMEN TO GET A STORY


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25 October 1933 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Detetive de Imprensa  »

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1.37 : 1
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Trivia

One of over a hundred Columbia features, mostly Westerns (although this one was not a Western), sold to Hygo Television Films in the 1950s, who marketed them under the name of Gail Pictures; opening credits were redesigned, with some titles misspelled, the credit order of the players rearranged, some names misspelled, and new end titles attached, thus eliminating any evidence of their Columbia roots. Apparently, the original material was not retained in most of the cases, and the films have survived, even in the Sony library, only with these haphazardly created replacement opening and end credits. See more »

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User Reviews

 
Tim McCoy in a non-western with sometimes hilarious results
7 July 2013 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Tim McCoy was a big western star at Columbia - that's the kind of film in which people were accustomed to seeing him. Here he's playing a gentleman of the press. Lauded by his boss in the morning for bringing in a great scoop, he's almost fired by that same boss in the afternoon for making a fool out of the paper. What happened is that he went to check out the shooting of a well known gangster. The police had corralled a girl found at the scene who will tell them nothing, and they really don't think she did it, but they think she knows who did. Tim looks around the house and, lo and behold, the shooter is still inside, knocks Tim out cold, steals his press pass, and goes right past the police. A rival paper plays up the angle of Tim's press pass being the key to the suspect's escape, thus drawing his boss' ire. Tim vows to get the scoop on who the killer is, job or no job, since this has become personal.

What Tim runs into is bigger than just a gangster shooting. What he uncovers is a "pay to play" scheme involving the parole system. Tim does get sent to prison, but it is done intentionally by him faking a drunk driving accident. The judge was in on the scheme, knowing that Tim needs to get close to certain convicts to figure out what is going on, and basically "helps" Tim by giving him the sentence he wants.

Once back on the street, Tim closes in on the corrupt officials involved and the gangsters. The hilarious results I talked about is when Tim is chasing one of the gangsters across some city roofs and shooting it out with him while the police look on, obviously OK with a civilian turning a crowded city street into a shooting gallery. Later, when the car he is riding in is ambushed by the gangsters, he jumps on back of one of the police motorcycles that come upon the scene and is, once again, shooting it out with the gangsters as they go on a wild chase.

These shoot-outs, accepted by the police, can only be a homage to Tim's Western fans who came to watch Tim McCoy shoot it out with outlaws, and the fact that it is modern times and Tim has a press pass not a badge is not going to prevent Columbia from giving the public what it wants.

Recommended for fans of Tim McCoy and of the old 30's newspaper caper films.


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