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Gold Diggers of 1933 (1933)

Unrated | | Comedy, Drama, Musical | 27 May 1933 (USA)
Millionaire turned composer Dick Powell rescues unemployed Broadway people with a new play.

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(screenplay) (as Erwin Gelsey), (screenplay) | 3 more credits »
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Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 1 win. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
Lawrence
...
Carol
Aline MacMahon ...
Trixie
...
Polly
...
Brad
...
Peabody
Ned Sparks ...
Barney
...
Fay
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Storyline

Chorus girls Polly, Carol and Trixie are ecstatic when they learn that Broadway producer Barney Hopkins is putting on a new show. He promises all of the girls parts in the new show and even hires their neighbor Brad Roberts, an unknown composer, to write some of the music. There's only one problem: he doesn't have the money to bankroll it all. That problem is solved when Brad turns out to be quite rich but he insists that he not perform. When opening night comes, the juvenile lead can't go on forcing Brad to take the stage. He's recognized of course and his upper crust family wants him to quit. When he refuses, they tell him to end his relationship with Polly or face having his income cut off. When Brad's snobbish brother Lawrence mistakes Carol for Polly, the girls decide to have a bit of fun and teach him a lesson. Written by garykmcd

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

REVEL IN THESE MIGHT SPECTACLES -- "The Parade of the Gold Diggers" "The Stairway to the Stars" "The Flower Garden of Girls" "The Ballet of the Snows" "The Dance of the Singing Violins" "The Pageant of the Forgotten Man" See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Musical

Certificate:

Unrated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

27 May 1933 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Golddiggers of 1933  »

Box Office

Budget:

$433,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(Turner library print)

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

According to "Sin in Soft Focus: Pre-Code Hollywood" by Mark A. Vieira (Harry N. Abrams, 1999), this was one of the first American films made and distributed with alternate footage in order to circumvent censorship problems. Various state censorship boards had their own standards to impose on motion pictures, so studios began filming slightly different versions of problematic scenes, which were then inserted into prints that were labeled to indicate which version would be sent to which state (or country). This picture, with risqué numbers like "Pettin' in the Park," had to make various adjustments to accommodate censors in different areas. See more »

Goofs

When Brad plays piano for Mr. Hopkins, his fingers don't match the sound of the piano. See more »

Quotes

Trixie Lorraine: Exuse me. Come here Fay, I have something I wan-ta show you.
Fay Fortune: what do you want?
Trixie Lorraine: Do you see that?
Fay Fortune: See what?
Trixie Lorraine: Can't you read? Where it says 'Exit'?
Fay Fortune: Exit?
Trixie Lorraine: You said it, sister. You start walking and you keep walking, and if you ever come near him again I'll break BOTH your legs, now scram!
Fay Fortune: I could easily resent that!
[as Fay walks away, Trixie kickes her in the bottom, making Fay squeal/shriek]
Faneul H. Peabody: Did Little Fay cry out?
[...]
See more »

Connections

Featured in The Great Depression (1993) See more »

Soundtracks

Pettin' in the Park
(1933) (uncredited)
Music by Harry Warren
Lyrics by Al Dubin
Performed by Ruby Keeler and Clarence Nordstrom in rehearsal, Dick Powell,
Ruby Keeler, Aline MacMahon, Billy Barty and chorus in the show
See more »

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User Reviews

 
Great Pre-Code Stuff
25 January 2006 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

This is the most perfect example of "history on the silver screen" that I can think of. When Ginger Rogers says, "It's the Depression, dearie" at the beginning to explain the chorus girls' bad luck, it's the key to the whole film. While the "Shadow Waltz" number was being filmed during an actual 1933 earthquake in L.A. a number of the girls toppled off the Art Deco "overpass" where they were swaying with their filmy hoop skirts and their neon violins short-circuited. The electrical hook-ups were also rather dangerous, especially if the neon bows came in contact with the girls' metallic wigs in that number. The culminating production number, "Remember My Forgotten Man," is the most significant historically and illustrates Warner Bros.' "New Deal" sensibilities. Warner Bros. was the only studio that "bought" the whole Roosevelt approach to economic recovery. The year before, under Hoover, WWI vets were not only neglected in terms of benefits but were run out of their shanty town near the Capitol building. Starving guys were camping on the edges of most communities who'd served in the Great War fifteen years before. Of course, why or how this number fits into such a '30s girlie-type musical revue is anyone's guess. Berkeley never looked for reality, just eye-popping surrealistic effects.

About ten years ago I found myself sitting next to Etta Moten Barnett at a Chicago NAACP banquet. I was flabbergasted. She was in her 90s yet still looked lovely. She's the singer who sang "Forgotten Man" in the window. She also sang "The Carioca" in Astaire and Rogers' first pairing, "Flying Down to Rio." She was quite gracious, though she did not have wonderful things to say about Hollywood of that era. The African Americans in both pictures were fed in a tent away from the general commissary area.

Ruby Keeler has a certain odd-ball appeal, like a homely puppy. She can't sing, she watches her leaden feet while she dances, and almost all her lines are read badly. Yes, she was married to Al Jolson, but that may have HURT her career more than anything. He was not exactly always likable. He was much older than Ruby and so full of himself.

This film is also a classic example of the PRE-CODE stuff that was slipping by---the leering "midget baby" (Billy Barty), the naked girls in silhouette changing into their "armor," the non-stop flashing of underwear or lack of underwear, Ginger Rogers having her large coin torn off by the sheriff's office mug so she's essentially standing there in panties, and so forth.

A good comparison of before and after the code would be to examine this picture and "Gold Diggers of 1935." The latter is so much more chaste, discreet, and less fascinating except for the numbers. There's not the lurid, horny aura of the Pre-Code pictures. And it's not quite as much naughty fun, either.


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