7.7/10
8,024
99 user 65 critic

42nd Street (1933)

Unrated | | Comedy, Musical, Romance | 11 March 1933 (USA)
A producer puts on what may be his last Broadway show and, at the last moment, a chorus girl has to replace the star.

Director:

Writers:

(screen play), (screen play) | 1 more credit »
Reviews

Watch Now

From $2.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

ON DISC
Nominated for 2 Oscars. Another 1 win. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Comedy | Drama | Musical
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.1/10 X  

Millionaire turned composer Dick Powell rescues unemployed Broadway people with a new play.

Director: Mervyn LeRoy
Stars: Warren William, Joan Blondell, Aline MacMahon
Comedy | Musical | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.8/10 X  

Chester Kent struggles against time, romance, and a rival's spy to produce spectacular live "prologues" for movie houses.

Director: Lloyd Bacon
Stars: James Cagney, Joan Blondell, Ruby Keeler
Dames (1934)
Comedy | Musical | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.2/10 X  

Multi-millionaire Ezra Ounce wants to start a campaign against 'filthy' forms of entertainment, like Broadway-Shows. He comes to his relatives families and makes them members of his ... See full summary »

Directors: Ray Enright, Busby Berkeley
Stars: Joan Blondell, Dick Powell, Ruby Keeler
Comedy | Musical
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.6/10 X  

In a luxury hotel stage director Nicoleff stages a show to get the money to pay his bills. Mrs. Prentiss, who is backing the show wants her daughter Ann to marry the millionaire T. Mosely ... See full summary »

Director: Busby Berkeley
Stars: Dick Powell, Adolphe Menjou, Gloria Stuart
Top Hat (1935)
Comedy | Musical | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.8/10 X  

An American dancer comes to Britain and falls for a model whom he initially annoyed, but she mistakes him for his goofy producer.

Director: Mark Sandrich
Stars: Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers, Edward Everett Horton
Crime | Drama | Film-Noir
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.1/10 X  

Wrongly convicted James Allen serves in the intolerable conditions of a southern chain gang, which later comes back to haunt him.

Director: Mervyn LeRoy
Stars: Paul Muni, Glenda Farrell, Helen Vinson
Comedy | Drama | History
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.5/10 X  

In the Gay Nineties, a seductive nightclub singer contends with several suitors, including a jealous escaped convict and a handsome temperance league member.

Director: Lowell Sherman
Stars: Mae West, Cary Grant, Owen Moore
Certificate: Passed Comedy | Musical | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.6/10 X  

A pretentiously artistic director is hired for a new Broadway musical and changes it beyond recognition.

Director: Vincente Minnelli
Stars: Fred Astaire, Cyd Charisse, Oscar Levant
Comedy | Musical | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.5/10 X  

Stage-producer J.J. Hobart, is going to put on a new show, but he doesn't know that his two partners lost the money at the stock market. Insurance salesman Rosmer Peek falls in love with ex... See full summary »

Director: Lloyd Bacon
Stars: Dick Powell, Joan Blondell, Glenda Farrell
Certificate: Passed Comedy | Musical | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.8/10 X  

A Parisian tailor finds himself posing as a baron in order to collect a sizeable bill from an aristocrat, only to fall in love with an aloof young princess.

Director: Rouben Mamoulian
Stars: Maurice Chevalier, Jeanette MacDonald, Charles Ruggles
Little Caesar (1931)
Crime | Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.3/10 X  

A small-time criminal moves to a big city to seek bigger fortune.

Director: Mervyn LeRoy
Stars: Edward G. Robinson, Douglas Fairbanks Jr., Glenda Farrell
The Divorcee (1930)
Certificate: Passed Romance | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.8/10 X  

When a woman discovers that her husband has been unfaithful to her, she decides to respond to his infidelities in kind.

Director: Robert Z. Leonard
Stars: Norma Shearer, Robert Montgomery, Chester Morris
Edit

Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
Mac Elroy
Edward J. Nugent ...
Terry
Robert McWade ...
Jones
...
Andy Lee
Edit

Storyline

Renowned Broadway producer/director Julian Marsh is hired to put together a new musical revue. It's being financed by Abner Dillon to provide a starring vehicle for his girlfriend, songstress Dorothy Brock. Marsh, who is quite ill, is a difficult task master working long hours and continually pushing the cast to do better. When Brock breaks her ankle one of the chorus girls, Peggy Sawyer, gets her big chance to be the star. She also finds romance along the way. Written by garykmcd

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

OK. Say, Jones and Barry are doin' a show! - That's great. Jones and Barry are doin' a show.


Certificate:

Unrated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

11 March 1933 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Forty-Second Street  »

Box Office

Budget:

$439,000 (estimated)

Gross:

$2,300,000 (USA)
 »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

The film takes place in 1932. See more »

Goofs

While in Philadelphia, Julian's position relative to the girls changes as he dismisses them for the night. See more »

Quotes

Julian Marsh: All right, now, everybody... quiet, and listen to me. Tomorrow morning, we're gonna start a show. We're gonna rehearse for five weeks, and we're gonna open on scheduled time, and I MEAN scheduled time. You're gonna work and sweat, and work some more. You're gonna work days, and you're gonna work nights, and you're gonna work BETWEEN time when I think you need it. You're gonna dance until your feet fall off, till you're not able to stand up any longer, BUT five weeks from now, we're going to ...
See more »

Connections

Referenced in Richard Roeper & the Movies: Black Swan (2010) See more »

Soundtracks

Shuffle Off to Buffalo
(1932) (uncredited)
Lyrics by Al Dubin
Music by Harry Warren
Sung and Danced by Ruby Keeler and Clarence Nordstrom
Also sung by Ginger Rogers, Una Merkel, and Chorus
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Adorable musical gem retains its charms in the 21st century
23 January 2003 | by (classic film/tv site NoirDame.com) – See all my reviews

While a few lines here and there no longer hold their spark, overall, this is a really charming little musical. THE backstage musical.

In her screen debut, it's impossible not to like Ruby Keeler, the stereotypical girl hoofer next door. Keeler had amazing energy -- after retirement and many years raising her family, she returned to Broadway in "No No Nanette". How many 80 year olds do you know who could still tap against the footlights? (As for comparisons between Keeler and wisecracker Ginger Rogers, that's about as silly as comparing Fred Astaire to Gene Kelly. Keeler, like Kelly, had a raw, athletic talent; Astaire, on the other hand, was more of a suave dancer, while Rogers exuded a sexy, spirited appeal.)

The cast is terrific. Warner Baxter seems ready to crack up any second; former silent star Bebe Daniels is classy, likable and vulnerable even in her bitchiest moments. One of her best scenes is during a drunken cast party the night before the musical opens in Philly, when she kicks and screams with abandon, and yet, you can't blame the dame. "When you're in a lady's room, act like one!"

Una Merkel, with Rogers, is hilarious, batting her eyes all over the place.

There's some masculine eye candy, too, when Keeler walks in on Dick"Young & Healthy" Powell in his underwear.

He can hold a great tune, seranading Berkeley's favorite gal, Toby Wing. Wing is so luminous in her spotlight number, it's hard to believe she never broke it wide open, like other former chorus gals Paulette Godard, Betty Grable and Lucille Ball.

George Brent, the blandest of Warners' leading men, is hopelessly miscast as Daniels' old vaudeville companion, but he plays well against Ruby Keeler and Daniels. A sharp little scene with Keeler's Irish landlady underscores the desperate times. Keeler's living on a prayer, living in a small room with a suitcase and not much more.

A great flick for a late evening, or Sunday afternoon.


25 of 31 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Recent Posts
The greatest musical EVER FranLovesBetteD
Little nifties from the 50s? bobbobato
The Ending kingbjbob
colourised version pauldlangford
Girl with Dick Powell in Y+H? muhltohi
'Shotgun at his Bel-Tummy' Skrbi
Discuss 42nd Street (1933) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?