MOVIEmeter
SEE RANK
Down 3,183 this week

Elmer, the Great (1933)

 -  Comedy | Romance | Sport  -  29 April 1933 (USA)
6.3
Your rating:
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 -/10 X  
Ratings: 6.3/10 from 255 users  
Reviews: 13 user | 3 critic

Elmer does not want to leave Gentryville, because Nellie is the one that he loves. Even when Mr. Wade of the Chicago Cubs comes to get him, it is only because Nellie spurns him that he goes... See full summary »

Director:

Writers:

(based on a play by), (based on a play by), 1 more credit »
0Check in
0Share...

User Lists

Related lists from IMDb users

a list of 1951 titles
created 23 Jun 2012
 
list image
a list of 344 titles
created 05 Sep 2012
 
a list of 727 titles
created 27 Mar 2013
 
a list of 49 titles
created 3 months ago
 
a list of 17 titles
created 3 months ago
 

Connect with IMDb


Share this Rating

Title: Elmer, the Great (1933)

Elmer, the Great (1933) on IMDb 6.3/10

Want to share IMDb's rating on your own site? Use the HTML below.

Take The Quiz!

Test your knowledge of Elmer, the Great.
Edit

Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
Elmer
Patricia Ellis ...
Nellie
Frank McHugh ...
Healy High-Hips
Claire Dodd ...
Evelyn
Preston Foster ...
Walker (as Preston S. Foster)
Russell Hopton ...
Whitey
...
Nick Kane (as Sterling Halloway)
Emma Dunn ...
Mrs. Kane
Charles C. Wilson ...
Mr. Wade (as Charles Wilson)
Charles Delaney ...
Johnny Abbott
Berton Churchill ...
Colonel Moffitt
J. Carrol Naish ...
Jerry (as J. Carroll Naish)
Gene Morgan ...
Noonan
Edit

Storyline

Elmer does not want to leave Gentryville, because Nellie is the one that he loves. Even when Mr. Wade of the Chicago Cubs comes to get him, it is only because Nellie spurns him that he goes. As always, Elmer is the king of batters and he wins game after game. When Nellie comes to see Elmer in Chicago, she sees him kissing Evelyn and she wants nothing to do with him anymore. So Healy takes him to a gambling club, where Elmer does not know that the chips are money. He finds that he owes the gamblers $5000 and they make him sign a note for it. Sad at losing Nellie, mad at his teammates and in debt to the gamblers, Elmer disappears as the Cubs are in the deciding game for the Series. Written by Tony Fontana <tony.fontana@spacebbs.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy | Romance | Sport

Certificate:

TV-G | See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

29 April 1933 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Elmer, the Great  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

"Lux Radio Theater" broadcast a 60 minute radio adaptation of the movie on October 5, 1936 with Joe E. Brown reprising his film role. See more »

Goofs

Elmer started the season with the Cubs wearing Number 8 on his jersey, but had Number 4 in the Series game. See more »

Quotes

Elmer Kane: Warm up? Hell, I ain't been cool since February!
See more »

Connections

Version of Fast Company (1929) See more »

Soundtracks

Take Me Out to the Ball Game
(1908) (uncredited)
Music by Albert von Tilzer
Played during the opening credits and often in the score
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
All Runners Batted In
2 August 2003 | by (Forest Ranch, CA) – See all my reviews

ELMER, THE GREAT home run hitter doesn't want to leave his pretty boss in Gentryville, Indiana, to play ball for the Chicago Cubs.

Rubber-limbed comic Joe E. Brown scores big in this fine little comedy. Without even trying, the fellow could be funny - his huge grin and mischievous eyes a sure catalyst for laughter. In his first scenes, the mere act of his putting on his socks or eating his breakfast is a riot. The film also gives him a chance to suffer from unrequited love and face the abuse heaped on him for his yokel ways as he tries to deal with professional ballplayers and dangerous gamblers. Brown carries it all off with natural aplomb.

A sturdy cast lends fine support: pretty Patricia Ellis as Brown's conflicted boss; sweet Emma Dunn as his loving mother; goofy Sterling Holloway, perfectly cast, as Brown's baseball-mad younger brother (notice that Holloway's name is spelled incorrectly in the credits). Blustery Berton Churchill plays the owner of the Cubs, Preston Foster is the manager. Genial Frank McHugh plays the Cubs catcher. Claire Dodd has a mysterious role; she seems to be a chum of the ballplayers and little else - but at least she's easy on the eyes and the plot doesn't try to set up a silly romance between her and Brown. Casino hoodlum J. Carrol Naish plays the film's villain.

Movie mavens will recognize an uncredited Jessie Ralph as Brown's plain speaking, softhearted housekeeper.

The early scenes in Gentryville have a delightfully homespun, nostalgic charm which the later Chicago sequences can't match. Notice the fine use the minimal soundtrack makes of just two songs: ‘Take Me Out To The Ball Game' & ‘On The Banks Of The Wabash.'

Brown's use of a four-letter word near the film's climax underscores the film's pre-Code status. Also of interest, in the last inning of the final World Series game, the plot has the catcher & pitcher of the New York Yankees deliberately and maliciously cheat in an attempt to win. One wonders what Babe Ruth & Lou Gehrig must have thought of that...

ELMER, THE GREAT was the second of Brown's ‘baseball trilogy,' the other films being FIREMAN, SAVE MY CHILD (1932) & ALIBI IKE (1935).


16 of 17 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Discuss Elmer, the Great (1933) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?