Design for Living
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15 items from 2011


Blu-ray Review: Risque, Delightful Comedy ‘Design For Living’ From Criterion

21 December 2011 9:20 AM, PST | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – From the very first scene, a first-silent exchange in which a beautiful woman enters a train car to see two handsome men sleeping across from her and chooses to draw them on her sketch pad before falling asleep and waking up to flirt with both of them outright, “Design For Living” is a romantic comedy masterpiece. I’m stunned to admit that I had never seen the Ernst Lubitsch risque joy but now I consider it one of my favorite Criterion editions. The movie is laugh-out-loud funny with three stars at the peak of their skills — charming, engaging, enjoyable. I’ve been doing this long enough that it’s increasingly rare to see a classic film for the first time that floors me like “Design For Living.” It’s stellar.

Blu-Ray Rating: 5.0/5.0

A painter (Gary Cooper), a playwright (Fredric March), and an artist (Miriam Hopkins) walk into a French apartment. »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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DVD: DVD: Design For Living

20 December 2011 10:03 PM, PST | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

Based on Noel Coward’s play, Design For Living concerns a love triangle between a fetching commercial artist and two bohemian friends and roommates who compete for her affections. She sleeps with one, then the other, and after a “gentleman’s agreement” for all parties to remain celibate, the truce is broken, and she again sleeps with one, then the other. It may be startling to some to learn that Design For Living was made in 1933, before the Hays Code would have rendered virtually every scene of it forbidden, but it’s truly depressing to realize that this witty »

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Blu-ray, DVD Release: David Lean Directs Noël Coward

16 December 2011 3:24 PM, PST | Disc Dish | See recent Disc Dish news »

Blu-ray & DVD Release Date: March 27, 2012

Price: DVD $79.95, Blu-ray $99.95

Studio: Criterion

Trevor Howard and Celia Johnson embark on a Brief Encounter.

In the 1940s, playwright Noël Coward (Design for Living) and filmmaker David Lean (Doctor Zhivago) worked together in one of cinema’s greatest writer-director collaborations, celebrated in the four-film Blu-ray and DVD collection David Lean Directs Noël Coward.

Beginning with the 1942 wartime military drama movie In Which We Serve, Coward and Lean embarked on a series of literate, socially engaged and undeniably entertaining movies that ranged from domestic epic (This Happy Breed) to whimsical comedy (Blithe Spirit) to poignant romance (Brief Encounter).

Here’s a brief run-down on each of the classic British films in the David Lean Directs Noël Coward DVD and Blu-ray collection, all of which created a lasting testament to Coward’s legacy and introduced Lean’s talents to the world:

In Which We Serve (1942)

This action »

- Laurence

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DVD Playhouse December 2011

11 December 2011 5:07 PM, PST | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

DVD Playhouse—December 2011

By Allen Gardner

The Rules Of The Game (Criterion) Jean Renoir’s classic from 1939 was met with a riot at its premiere and was severely cut by its distributor, available only in truncated form for two decades until it was restored to the grandeur for which it is celebrated today. A biting comedy of manners set in the upstairs and downstairs of a French country estate, the film bitterly vivisects the bourgeoisie with a gentle ferocity that will tickle the laughter in your throat. Renoir co-stars as Octave. Also available on Blu-ray disc. Bonuses: Introduction to the film by Renoir; Commentary written by scholar Alexander Sesonske and read by Peter Bogdanovich; Comparison of the film’s two endings; Selected scene analysis by Renoir scholar Chris Faulkner; Featurettes and vintage film clips; Part one of David Thomson’s “Jean Renoir” BBC documentary; Video essay; Interviews with Renoir, crew members, »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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Movie Poster of the Week: “Design for Living”

9 December 2011 6:06 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

The release this week of the Criterion Collection’s DVD and Blu-ray of Ernst Lubitsch’s Design for Living (1933) sent me off in search of posters for the film, which led me on a virtual paper-chase that ended up with my scouring Palm Springs newspapers for articles about a nonagenarian retiree.

The one design for the film that really caught my eye was this bold, brightly colored, but somewhat crudely illustrated (it doesn’t really do Miriam Hopkins justice) poster. Tracing it back to Heritage Auctions, which sold the poster in 2008, I discovered that it was one of a batch of rare two sheets that had been saved by the original artist and passed down to his family. Two sheets, which measure 41" x 54" (the size of two regular posters) were printed in New York and designed specifically to be used for outdoor advertising in the city as well as on the subway. »

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Daily Briefing. "Commodified Cinema"

8 December 2011 5:58 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Peter Kubelka's Schwechater (1958)

Filmmaker Paul Clipson, profiled last month on the occasion of his winning a Goldie from the Bay Guardian, presents Commodified Cinema: Art, Advertising, and Commodities in Film today at noon at Sfmoma. Brecht Andersch: "Clipson is on to something here: from its inception, cinema has been seen by hoity toities as the commodified form par excellence, a cultural equivalent to advertising. As time rolls on, the bitter ironies of these notions become painfully evident: due to their relative fragility as art objects when run through a projector, celluloid artworks have never worked as collectible items of envy, and the on-going currency of critique in contemporary art has rendered much of it advertising for shallow, if politically correct ideology. In recent years, the ascendency of digital moving image technologies in all their many forms has been embraced by those with un- or semi-conscious resentment towards the photochemical »

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New this Week: ‘Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy,’ ‘The Sitter’ and ‘Cowboys & Aliens (DVD)’

7 December 2011 7:00 AM, PST | The Scorecard Review | See recent Scorecard Review news »

Hitting movie theaters this weekend:

New Year’s Eve - Sarah Jessica ParkerJessica BielAshton Kutcher

The SitterJonah HillAri GraynorSam Rockwell

Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy (limited) - Gary OldmanColin FirthTom Hardy

Movie of the Week

Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy

The Stars: Gary OldmanColin FirthTom Hardy

The Plot: In the bleak days of the Cold War, espionage veteran George Smiley (Oldman) is forced from semi-retirement to uncover a Soviet agent within MI6′s echelons.

The Buzz: Great title, great cast, great premise. Sold, sold and sold. Gary Oldman is too cool for school. I can’t wait to see this one. On top of the awesomeness that is Oldman, the film also boasts a bevy of heavy hitters in Colin Firth, Tom Hardy, John Hurt, and Mark Strong. I enjoy all of these actors a great deal, so regarding the cast, this film looks super solid. »

- Aaron Ruffcorn

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This Week On DVD and Blu-ray: December 6, 2011

6 December 2011 8:18 AM, PST | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

DVD Links: DVD News | Release Dates | New Dvds | Reviews | RSS Feed

This week I thought I would add a few holiday deals from Amazon for you to check out before getting into the week's new releases. Maybe you'll find something you like.

Blu-ray Deals Toy Story Ultimate Toy Box Collection ($49.99) The Lord of the Rings: The Motion Picture Trilogy (Extended Editions) ($49.99) Inception ($7.99) The Ultimate Matrix Collection ($32.99) Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Part 1 ($9.99) The Dark Knight ($7.99) Batman Begins ($7.99) DVD Deals It's a Wonderful Life (60th Anniversary Edition) ($10.99) Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Part 1 ($4.99) The Wizard of Oz (Two-Disc 70th Anniversary Edition) ($7.99) Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince ($5.00) The Hangover ($6.99) The Blind Side ($5.49) Gone with the Wind (Two-Disc 70th Anniversary Edition) ($8.49) And now for today's new releases...

The Lady Vanishes (Criterion Collection) [Blu-ray] A great film and a solid presentation, and a disc owners of even the four-year-old DVD remaster »

- Brad Brevet

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Slackery News Tidbits, November 10

10 November 2011 7:30 AM, PST | Slackerwood | See recent Slackerwood news »

Here's the latest Austin and Central Texas movie news.

Drafthouse Films, the distribution arm of the Alamo Drafthouse franchise, recently announced the company has entered a U.S. distribution deal with Image Entertainment, Inc. This will make it easier for Drafthouse Films to release new movies and repertory films via a number of platforms (home video, TV, etc.). The California-based company is considered a leading licensee and distributor of North American independent entertainment programming. Image Entertainment's library of licensed movie titles includes the Criterion Collection, various horror movies (they're releasing SXSW 2011 selection Little Deaths soon) and classic films like 12 Angry Men and Design for Living.In addition, Drafthouse Films has acquired the North American rights to a pair of movies that played Fantastic Fest this year: the Oscar-nominated Belgian drama, Bullhead (Debbie's review), and the international hit comedy, Clown: The Movie. While Bullhead concerns itself with a shady deal »

- Jordan Gass-Poore'

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The Criterion Collection Announce December Blu-ray Slate Including Hitchcock's The Lady Vanishes

15 September 2011 3:37 PM, PDT | TheHDRoom | See recent TheHDRoom news »

The Criterion Collection has just announced its Blu-ray release slate for December and, while it's a bit lighter than usual (only four releases instead of the now almost customary six or seven), it's remains another strong month and an excellent way to end a fantastic year of releases.

Of the four upcoming titles, only one is a new addition to the collection; Ernst Lubitsch's Design for Living. Released in 1933, Design for Living stars Gary Cooper, Miriam Hopkins and Fredric March and is in part a risque romantic comedy while also taking a witty approach towards the individuals' creative pursuits. Lubitsch is a Criterion favorite, and this release should further prove just why that is.

The three remaining releases are all High Definition upgrades of previous Criterion DVDs, and they are quite the lineup. First and foremost we see the incomparable Alfred Hitchcock receive another well deserved high definition release with his 1938 comic thriller, »

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New Release: Design for Living DVD and Blu-ray

15 September 2011 2:27 PM, PDT | Disc Dish | See recent Disc Dish news »

Release Date: Dec. 6, 2011

Price: DVD $29.95, Blu-ray $39.95

Studio: Criterion

Fredric March (l.), Miriam Hopkins and Gary Cooper hit a bump in the road in their Design for Living.

Gary Cooper (High Noon), Fredric March (The Best Years of Our Lives) and Miriam Hopkins (Trouble in Paradise) play a trio of Americans in Paris who enter into a very adult “gentleman’s” agree­ment in the 1933 classic comedy film Design for Living.

A risqué relationship movie (made before the Motion Picture Production Code began being enforced in 1934) and a witty take on creative pursuits, Design for Living was directed by Ernst Lubitsch (To Be or Not To Be) and freely adapted by Ben Hecht (Notorious) from a play by Noël Coward (Brief Encounter).

At once a debonair and racy adult entertainment, the movie concerns a commercial artist (Hopkins) unable — or unwilling — to choose between the equally dashing painter (Cooper) and playwright (March »

- Laurence

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Criterion Offers Up Ernst Lubitsch's 'Design For Living' & 3 BluRay Upgrades For December

15 September 2011 12:18 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

December is traditionally a lean month for Criterion. With the holidays in full swing and dozens of other high profile holiday releases all battling on store shelves to be the stocking stuffer for the cinephile in your family, the boutique label has traditionally scaled back their releases. However, we've never seen a month as thin as this. Today, Criterion announced their December slate of movies and there is only one new title and three BluRay upgrades. Marking the only fresh movie to get a wacky C stamped on it, Ernst Lubitsch's "Design For Living" will join the collection, boasting some… »

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Sheila Burrell obituary

27 July 2011 4:05 PM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

A striking stage presence for more than 60 years and a familiar face on TV

Sheila Burrell, who has died aged 89 after a long illness, was a cousin of Laurence Olivier, and a similarly distinctive and fiery actor with a broad, open face, high cheekbones and expressive eyes. She stood at only 5ft 5ins but could fill the widest stage and hold the largest audience. Her voice was a mezzo marvel, kittenish or growling and, in later life, acquired the viscosity and vintage of an old ruby port, matured after years of experience.

In a career spanning more than 60 years, she made her name as a wild, red-headed Barbara Allen (subject of the famous ballad) in Peter Brook's 1949 production of Dark of the Moon (Ambassadors theatre), an American pot-boiler about the seduction of a lusty girl by a witch boy and the hysterical reaction of her local community.

The role remained one of her favourites, »

- Michael Coveney

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Sheila Burrell obituary

27 July 2011 4:05 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

A striking stage presence for more than 60 years and a familiar face on TV

Sheila Burrell, who has died aged 89 after a long illness, was a cousin of Laurence Olivier, and a similarly distinctive and fiery actor with a broad, open face, high cheekbones and expressive eyes. She stood at only 5ft 5ins but could fill the widest stage and hold the largest audience. Her voice was a mezzo marvel, kittenish or growling and, in later life, acquired the viscosity and vintage of an old ruby port, matured after years of experience.

In a career spanning more than 60 years, she made her name as a wild, red-headed Barbara Allen (subject of the famous ballad) in Peter Brook's 1949 production of Dark of the Moon (Ambassadors theatre), an American pot-boiler about the seduction of a lusty girl by a witch boy and the hysterical reaction of her local community.

The role remained one of her favourites, »

- Michael Coveney

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The Man Who Was Count Yorga: A Tribute to Robert Quarry

3 January 2011 10:34 AM, PST | Shadowlocked | See recent Shadowlocked news »

February 2009 began on a sad note for many vampire lovers and horror fans with the death of iconic genre legend Robert Quarry. If there was one actor capable of equalling Christopher Lee’s immortal performance as Dracula it was Quarry as the evil Count Yorga. A veteran of stage and TV, Quarry was set to become a major horror star of the seventies, but his film career faded rapidly, a situation not helped by a terrible run of bad luck that nearly cost him his life. Despite never achieving the movie stardom he deserved, his enigmatic turn as the sardonic vampire lord has given him cult immortality.

The son of a doctor, Robert Walter Quarry was born in Fresno, California on 3 November 1925. He spent his early years in Santa Rosa, Northern California, where he excelled in most high school sports, especially swimming. Quarry, who had an Iq of 168, became interested in acting through his grandmother, »

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

15 items from 2011


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