6.9/10
29
5 user 2 critic

The Crime of the Century (1933)

Passed | | Mystery | 18 February 1933 (USA)
A doctor who is also a "mentalist" confesses to a murder. The only problem is that the murder he's confessed to hasn't happened yet--although dead bodies are now starting to turn up all ... See full summary »

Director:

Writers:

(play), (adaptation) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
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Dr. Emil Brandt
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Freda Brandt
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Dan McKee
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Doris Brandt
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Gilbert Reid
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Police Capt. Timothy Riley
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Police Lt. Frank Martin
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Jim Brandt
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Hilda Ericson - Maid
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Eric Ericson - Butler
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Philip Ames
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Storyline

A doctor who is also a "mentalist" confesses to a murder. The only problem is that the murder he's confessed to hasn't happened yet--although dead bodies are now starting to turn up all over the place. A reporter sets out to solve the "mystery". Written by frankfob2@yahoo.com

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Plot Keywords:

murder | reporter | based on play | See All (3) »

Genres:

Mystery

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

18 February 1933 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

On Probation  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Noiseless Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Toward the end of the film, the story is interrupted by the appearance of an announcer (played by Arthur Hohl,) who states that mysteries move too swiftly for the audience to determine the villain, and for this reason a one minute intermission will be provided for them to solve the mystery on their own before returning to the story. See more »

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User Reviews

In Front of your Face
9 February 2015 | by See all my reviews

A mystery the way they used to make them, full of clues, an on screen detective and the expectation that the audience is working hard to make sense of everything. Near the end, they stop the film and an announcer appears to give the audience a minute to guess.

The murderer is hard to guess, and this also has some interesting genre features. One is that the main suspect turns himself in before the crime. What mars this is that we have that one anti-cinematic device: the lights go out and events happen without us being able to see them. All crimes happen on-screen, but the crime itself is occluded. This happens twice, each time there is a murder.

As a narrative device, we have evolved away from this one, and I guess I am sad to see it go, because with it, you have purity: everything essential happens in front of you. But evolved away we have, to be replaced by off screen unknowns.

We have also lost the character who is our on-screen detective, but not as a result of cinematic development. These guys just faded from life in general, the newspaper crime reporter. That is a loss too.


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