The Bowery (1933) - News Poster

(1933)

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Fox Celebrates its Centennial with 100 Digital Releases

  • Comicmix
Los Angeles, Calif. (October 2, 2015) – In 1915 William Fox founded Fox Film Corporation and forever changed the course of cinema. Over the next century the studio would develop some of the most innovative and ground-breaking advancements in the history of cinema; the introduction of Movietone, the implementation of color in partnership with Eastman Kodak, the development of the wide format in 70mm and many more. Now in honor of the 100th anniversary of the studio, Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment will celebrate by releasing some of their most iconic films that represent a decade of innovation.

Starting today, five classic films from the studio will be made available digitally for the first time ever – Sunrise (1927), Drums Along the Mohawk (1939), Man Hunt (1941), How to Marry a Millionaire (1953) and The Flight of the Phoenix (1965). Throughout the rest of the year a total of 100 digital releases will follow from Fox’s extensive catalog, including 10 films
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Toward a Minor Movies

  • MUBI
Three notes on Wings and William Wellman’s home movies.

I.

In the non-genre of the aviation romance—a boy and his plane—Howard Hawks gets to keep up as specter of cinema incarnate, granting and granted movies as an all-American ideal: a studio built by man, a world closed-off, remade and renewed in his actions as barkeep, strummer, errant lover. But against the attraction of pure cinema, American Idyll, there’s American history, not quite so pure, teetering chassis of botched escapades, scores wounded, fast-money men who kill kids because it’s a living. Each man in his time, Raoul Walsh labeled his autobiography, and as the kid says in Walsh's The Bowery (1933), get the buck, give the breeze. The ethos comes out the same as Hawks that nobility’s worth it only for itself, but against Hawks’ cinema of action plays this cinema of reaction, William Wellman’s movies that show,
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New York's "Essential Pre-Code" Series: Week 2

  • MUBI
Each year New York residents can look forward to two essential series programmed at the Film Forum, noirs and pre-Coders (that is, films made before the strict enforcing of the Motion Picture Production Code). These near-annual retrospective traditions are refreshed and re-varied and re-repeated for neophytes and cinephiles alike, giving all the chance to see and see again great film on film. Many titles in this year's Essential Pre-Code series, running an epic July 15 - August 11, are old favorites and some ache to be new discoveries; all in all there are far too many racy, slipshod, patter-filled celluloid splendors to be covered by one critic alone. Faced with such a bounty, I've enlisted the kind help of some friends and colleagues, asking them to sent in short pieces on their favorites in an incomplete but also in-progress survey and guide to one of the summer's most sought-after series. In this entry: what's playing Friday,
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Jackie Cooper, 1922 - 2011

Updated through 5/7.

"Jackie Cooper, the pug-nosed kid who became America's Boy in tear-jerker films of the Great Depression, then survived Hollywood's notorious graveyard of child stardom and flourished as an adult in television and modern pictures, died Tuesday in Los Angeles. He was 88." Robert D McFadden for the New York Times: "Before the heydays of Shirley Temple and Mickey Rooney, young Jackie, a ragged urchin with a pout and a mischievous half-winked eye, was dreaming up schemes in Our Gang comedies and Wallace Beery pictures, like Treasure Island, that Hollywood churned out. At 9 he became the youngest Oscar nominee for best actor (a record that he still holds), in Skippy (1931). Later he dated Lana Turner and Judy Garland, and spent weekends on the yacht of MGM's boss, Louis B Mayer."

In the Los Angeles Times, Dennis McLellan notes that during his MGM heyday, Cooper "placed his foot- and handprints in
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Jackie Cooper Rip

Jackie Cooper Rip
Jackie Cooper, the man best known to our generation as Perry White in the four Superman films starring Christopher Reeve, died on Tuesday at the age of 88.But Cooper was known for far more than the sardonic editor of the Daily Planet. Long before he tangled with Clark Kent and co, he was a child star who went on to enjoy a 60-year acting career.Born in La in 1922, he got his start in silent films and became a child favourite appearing in Our Gang shorts. But his really big break was getting cast in Skippy, based on a comic strip. His performance in the title role earned Cooper an Oscar nomination at the tender age of nine, and his record stands today as both the first child actor to score a nomination and still the youngest in history.Skippy and its sequel, Spooky, helped propel him to stardom and
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Jackie Cooper obituary

A reluctant Hollywood child star, he returned to the spotlight in the Superman movies

Jackie Cooper, who has died aged 88, was the first child star of the talkies, paving the way for Freddie Bartholomew, Shirley Temple and Mickey Rooney. While they could turn on the waterworks when called for, Cooper beat them all easily at the crying game. Little Jackie, from the age of eight until his early teens, blubbed his way effectively through a number of tearjerkers. Sometimes he would try to suppress his tears, pouting and saying, "Ah, shucks! Ah, shucks!" As a critic wrote in 1934: "Jackie Cooper's tear ducts, having been more or less in abeyance for the past few months, have been opened up to provide an autumn freshet in Peck's Bad Boy."

Cooper had started off in the movies billed as "the little tough guy" in eight of Hal Roach's Our Gang comedy shorts.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

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