IMDb > White Zombie (1932)
White Zombie
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White Zombie (1932) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

User Rating:
6.4/10   7,034 votes »
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Popularity: ?
Up 3% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Garnett Weston (story)
Garnett Weston (dialogue)
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for White Zombie on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
4 August 1932 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
They knew this fiend was practicing zombiism on the Natives, but when he tried it on a white girl the nation revolted. See more »
Plot:
A young man turns to a witch doctor to lure the woman he loves away from her fiancé, but instead turns her into a zombie slave. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
User Reviews:
Even better on the Big Screen See more (155 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Bela Lugosi ... 'Murder' Legendre

Madge Bellamy ... Madeline Short Parker

Joseph Cawthorn ... Dr. Bruner

Robert Frazer ... Charles Beaumont

John Harron ... Neil Parker
Brandon Hurst ... Silver
George Burr Macannan ... Von Gelder - Zombie (as George Burr MacAnnan)
Frederick Peters ... Chauvin - Zombie
Annette Stone ... Maid
John Printz ... Ledot - Zombie
Dan Crimmins ... Pierre - Witch Doctor
Claude Morgan ... Zombie
John Fergusson ... Zombie
Velma Gresham ... Tall Maid
rest of cast listed alphabetically:

Clarence Muse ... Coach Driver (uncredited)

Directed by
Victor Halperin 
 
Writing credits
Garnett Weston (story)

Garnett Weston (dialogue)

William B. Seabrook  novel "The Magic Island" (uncredited)

Produced by
Edward Halperin .... producer
Phil Goldstone .... producer (uncredited)
 
Cinematography by
Arthur Martinelli 
 
Film Editing by
Harold McLernon  (as Howard McLernon)
 
Art Direction by
Ralph Berger 
 
Makeup Department
Carl Axzelle .... makeup artist (as Carl Axcelle)
Jack P. Pierce .... makeup artist (as Jack Pierce)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
William Cody .... assistant director
Herbert Glazer .... assistant director
 
Art Department
Conrad Tritschler .... sets
 
Sound Department
L.E. Clark .... sound engineer
 
Special Effects by
Howard A. Anderson .... special effects (as Harold Anderson)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Charles Bohny .... assistant camera (uncredited)
Jockey Arthur Feindel .... camera operator (uncredited)
Enzo A. Martinelli .... assistant camera (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Abe Meyer .... music supervisor (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Herbert Farjeon .... dialogue director
Sidney Marcus .... assistant to producer
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
69 min | USA:67 min (Roan restoration) | Canada:85 min (Ontario)
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (RCA Photophone Noiseless Recording)
Certification:
Australia:PG | Canada:G (Manitoba/Nova Scotia/Quebec) | Finland:K-18 (2004) (self applied) | UK:A (original rating) | UK:PG (video rating) (1991) | USA:Passed (National Board of Review)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The voodoo chanting that plays over the opening credits is sampled in the song "El Imperio del Mal" by the Spanish rock band Migala.See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: When Madeline sees Legendre's face in her wine, she begins to set the glass down with both hands, mostly using her left. In the next shot, her right hand holds the cup and her left is on the table. Also, the position of her head changes between shots, from looking slightly up to looking directly ahead.See more »
Quotes:
[first lines]
Neil Parker:Looks like a burial.
Madeline:In the road?
See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
AppassionataSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
17 out of 18 people found the following review useful.
Even better on the Big Screen, 7 November 2009
Author: ebubier from United States

This review will be more about the print and theatrical experience than about the plot. Most people won't find this "useful", but hey, so what. Here's my two cents.

If you have the opportunity to see the Roan Group print projected in a theater, don't hesitate. Go see it.

I just saw this in the big screen last weekend and it is MUCH better in a proper theater with a crowd of enthusiasts than in the confines of your home, even with a big TV and 5.1. The audience I was in was comprised of about 150 kids and their parents. The kids had a great time as did I, who has seen the movie several times over the years in the washed out public domain video prints that have circulated forever.

The Roan Group print (same as the remastered DVD) is the one we saw, projected in 35 mm. It was obvious that there were two sources for this print. The vast majority of this appears to come from a very nice print with high contrast and sharp definition. The "fill-in" portions, apparently missing from the other source, are much more typical of a 75-year-old cheapie independent production shot in 11 days, i.e., scratchy, multiple generations removed from the negative, and faded. Thankfully there's not too much from that second source. There are a few jumps in the film (a few seconds at most) that could not be restored. Too bad, but no biggie.

The sound was problematic, veering from a comfortable volume when dialogue was speaking, to way too loud, almost to the point of distortion, when the music played or the bird squawked. I really don't think it was the theater's fault as their sound is always "just right".

Interestingly, for a movie this old (pre King Kong and Bride of Frankenstein) there was a whole lot of music and not as much dialogue as one usually gets in a film from this era. The music was rarely background to dialogue and was used almost exclusively to enhance the mood of the film. It was probably cheaper to do it this way, but who cares why. It works.

This is a really neat film full of great shots and creepy characters. Bela is fantastic, maybe his best performance on film. White Zombie hardly ranks up there with the Universal classics of the era, but it is positively time for a historical and critical reappraisal of this newly restored film.

It's good on video, but on the big screen, WOW!

Was the above review useful to you?
See more (155 total) »

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