IMDb > Trouble in Paradise (1932)
Trouble in Paradise
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Trouble in Paradise (1932) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

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Director:
Writers:
Samson Raphaelson (screenplay)
Grover Jones (adaptation)
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Trouble in Paradise on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
21 October 1932 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
A gentleman thief and a lady pickpocket join forces to con a beautiful perfume company owner. Romantic entanglements and jealousies confuse the scheme. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
2 wins See more »
User Reviews:
So funny, sexy, subtle and sublime, this film only gets better with each viewing, BUT it's not available in ANY format! WHY? See more (61 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Miriam Hopkins ... Lily

Kay Francis ... Madame Mariette Colet
Herbert Marshall ... Gaston Monescu

Charles Ruggles ... The Major (as Charlie Ruggles)

Edward Everett Horton ... François Filiba

C. Aubrey Smith ... Adolph J. Giron
Robert Greig ... Jacques, Mariette's Butler
Leonid Kinskey ... The Communist
George Humbert ... Waiter
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Luis Alberni ... Annoyed Opera Fan (uncredited)
Hooper Atchley ... Insurance Agent (uncredited)
Tyler Brooke ... Commercial Singer (uncredited)
Marion Byron ... Maid (uncredited)
Perry Ivins ... Radio Commentator (uncredited)
Gus Leonard ... Elderly Servant (uncredited)
Fred Malatesta ... Hotel Manager (uncredited)
Eva McKenzie ... Duchess Chambreau (uncredited)
Hector V. Sarno ... Prefect of Police (uncredited)
Rolfe Sedan ... Purse Salesman (uncredited)
Larry Steers ... Party Guest (uncredited)

Nella Walker ... Mme. Bouchet (uncredited)
Florence Wix ... Party Guest (uncredited)

Directed by
Ernst Lubitsch 
 
Writing credits
Samson Raphaelson (screenplay)

Grover Jones (adaptation)

Aladar Laszlo (play "The Honest Finder") (as Laszlo Aladar)

Produced by
Ernst Lubitsch .... producer
 
Original Music by
W. Franke Harling (uncredited)
 
Cinematography by
Victor Milner (photographed by)
 
Art Direction by
Hans Dreier (uncredited)
 
Costume Design by
Travis Banton (gowns)
 
Sound Department
M.M. Paggi .... sound (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Earl Crowley .... still photographer (uncredited)
William Miller .... camera operator (uncredited)
Eugene Richee .... still photographer (uncredited)
Guy Roe .... assistant camera (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Eugene Joseff .... costume jeweller (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
83 min
Country:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Western Electric Noiseless Recording)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
This movie was popular both with critics and with audiences, but was made before the enforcement of the production code. After 1935, it was withdrawn from circulation and was not seen again until 1968. The film was never available on videocassette and only became available on DVD in 2003.See more »
Goofs:
Boom mic visible: (at around 10 mins) A very clearshadow of a boom mic moves against the wall/screen behind Lily, anticipating her next action (rising and moving toward Gaston).See more »
Quotes:
Lily Vautier:Well, I'll leave you alone with that lady. But if you behave like a gentleman, I'll break your neck.See more »
Movie Connections:
Featured in Paramount Presents (1974) (TV)See more »
Soundtrack:
O Sole MioSee more »

FAQ

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52 out of 65 people found the following review useful.
So funny, sexy, subtle and sublime, this film only gets better with each viewing, BUT it's not available in ANY format! WHY?, 20 September 2002
Author: larry41onEbay from Culpeper, VA

So funny, sexy, subtle and sublime, this film only gets better with each viewing, BUT it's not available in ANY format! WHY?

Ernst Lubitsch used Laszlo Aladar's play The Honest Finder as a springboard for one of his most delightful early-1930s Paramount confections. Herbert Marshall and Miriam Hopkins play Gaston and Lily, a pair of Parisian thieves, both disguised as nobility, who decide to rob lovely perfume company executive Mariette Colet (Kay Francis); Gaston gets a job as Mariette's confidential secretary, while Lily installs herself as the woman's typist. Love rears its head, forcing Gaston to choose between marriage to Mariette and a fast getaway with Lily. Filled with marvelous throwaway gags and sophisticated innuendo, Trouble in Paradise was described by one critic as "as close to perfection as anything I have ever seen in the movies."

For over seven decades this film has been unmatched in the realm of sophisticated farce. Films from THE AWFUL TRUTH to THE LADY EVE to SOME LIKE IT HOT are sublime on their more modest social scale and in their basic Americanness. By contrast, TROUBLE IN PARADISE has all the class and Continental elegance one associates with the Paramout of the 1930s. Made before the Production Code clampdown of 1934, this Lubitsch masterpiece shows his talent for sly sexual innuendo at its most witty and polished. The result is pure caviar, only tastier. The story tells of two jewel thieves, Gaston (Marshall) and Lily (Hopkins), who together work at bilking a merry widow, Mariette Colet (Francis), out of a small fortune. They secure jobs as her secretary and maid, but trouble begins in paradise when Gaston starts falling for his lovely prey and when one of her many suitors (Horton), a former victim of Gaston's, begins to recognize Mme. Colet's new secretary. The many laughs in this consistently delightful souffle come not only from Raphaelson's marvelous screenplay but also from Lubitsch's supple visual wit. On one hand there's delightful repartee about a former secretary who enjoyed an antique bed a bit too much, and on the other we have the sexy silhouette of Gaston and Mariette cast over a chaise lounge. From the opening shot of an operatic gondolier who turns out to be a garbageman to a police report about theft and tonsils translated for Italian officials, this film is full of unforgettable moments of merriment. The cast, too, is peerless. In one of his earliest Hollywood efforts, Herbert Marshall does the greatest work of his career. Too often maligned for playing stodgy consorts to dynamic star actresses such as Garbo, Davis, and Shearer, Marshall here gets to display his impeccable timing and supple grace. Frequently hilarious, his quiet approach and crushed velvet voice still let him remain suave throughout. Even Cary Grant would be hard pressed to match this portrayal. (He'd be too frantic.) Kay Francis, too, that popular sufferer of countless "women's films" with her "twoublesome" r's, gives of her very best. With her sleek, glamorous style and elegantly wry line readings, she is light, sexy, and totally captivating. Her doorway caresses and her finger-snapping seduction of Gaston are priceless. Miriam Hopkins was luckier in that she had many more chances to display her comic flair in film. Today one of the most underrated and unfairly maligned stars of the 1930s, the brittle, feisty Hopkins can rattle off witty banter at a breakneck pace or she can be deliciously languorous and coy. Her enjoyment of her own sexuality is heady even today and the thieving competition between Gaston and Lily, in which escalating crimes turn into escalating passion, remains one of the greatest scenes of foreplay ever caught on film. Ruggles and Horton prove yet again that they are two of the greatest farceurs in Hollywood, and the rest of the cast is equally choice. (One standout is Leonid Kinskey, whose bit as a leftist radical only foregrounds the satiric anarchy of the entire film.) Beautifully handled from start to finish, gleamingly shot and full of Dreier's incredible Art Deco designs, TROUBLE IN PARADISE is Lubitsch's greatest film and one of the indisputable highlights of comic cinema Directed by Ernst Lubitsch, the master of sophisticated comedy, Trouble in Paradise (1932) is the most accomplished example of the "Lubitsch Touch" for stylish innuendo and sly wit. With a script by Samson Raphaelson and Grover Jones, Lubitsch derives sparkling humor from the lusty (Pre-Code) love triangle among two jewel thieves, Lily and Gaston, and their intended victim, Mme. Colet. From the opening image of a garbage gondola's gliding through the picturesque Venice canals, Lubitsch makes light of the notion that amorality lies beneath the glossy exteriors of the rich. Elegantly sending up idealized movie romance, Gaston and Lily fall in love as they attempt to rob each other blind over an intimate dinner, sealing a bond between two scoundrels. Such Lubitsch details as a hand's hanging a "Do Not Disturb" sign on a doorknob and the shadow of a couple cast on a bed neatly communicate the nature of Gaston's relationships with Lily and Mme. Colet, complementing the clever dialogue, spiked with nimble come-ons and ripostes, and delivered with aplomb by Herbert Marshall, Miriam Hopkins, and Kay Francis. Praised for its smoothly imaginative technique and comic invention, Trouble in Paradise burnished Lubitsch's reputation as Paramount's premier purveyor of 1930s Continental class, and it is still considered one of the best adult comedies ever made.

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