6.5/10
255
12 user 7 critic

The Strange Love of Molly Louvain (1932)

Not Rated | | Crime, Drama, Romance | 28 May 1932 (USA)
Molly Louvain's plans for a respectable marriage with her sweetheart Jimmy fall through so she takes to the road with a two-bit crook and becomes wanted by the police in connection with a high-profile crime.

Director:

Writers:

(play) (as Maurine Watkins), (adaptation) (as Erwin Gelsey) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
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Pop - a Policeman
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Nicky Grant
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Skeets - a Reporter
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Doris
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Captain Slade
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Dance Hall Girl
Thomas E. Jackson ...
Police Sergeant (as Thomas Jackson)
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Detective Martin
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Storyline

Abandoned by her mother at a young age, Molly Louvain is seen as no good, but she dreams of living respectably with her sweetheart Jimmy, who has promised to marry her. When Molly arrives at Jimmy's house to finally meet his mother she is informed that both Jimmy and his mother have been called out-of-town suddenly and that the dinner has been canceled. Heartbroken and carrying Jimmy's unborn child, Molly takes to the road with Nicky Grant, a small-time crook from her past. A couple years pass and she leaves her daughter in the care of another woman. One night Jimmy and his college pals visit the dance hall where Molly works as a hostess. Jimmy and Molly are happy to see one another and catch up on old times. Drunk and jealous, Nicky orders Molly and Jimmy into a car he has stolen. When the police spot the car, Nicky fires some shots and runs into an alley, hitting an officer before being wounded himself. Molly drives off in the car with Jimmy. With a cop dead, the entire city is on ... Written by Jimmy L.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Crime | Drama | Romance

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

28 May 1932 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The Tinsel Lady  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Although the play, "Tinsel Girl" by Maurine Dallas Watkins was unpublished, it was copyrighted on 16 October 1931. See more »

Goofs

The title character's name is misspelled "Molly Louvaine" in a newspaper headline. See more »

Quotes

Scotty Cornell: Takes practice to live with a bullet in your heart.
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Soundtracks

When We're Alone (Penthouse Serenade)
(1931) (uncredited)
Written by Val Burton and Will Jason
Played during the opening credits and at the end
Played on piano, hummed and partially sung by Ann Dvorak
Played on the radio and at the dance hall
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User Reviews

 
What was Warner Bros. drinking?
22 October 2006 | by See all my reviews

Whatever it was, it's too bad there doesn't seem to be any of it left. Warner Bros. pre-code was like a renaissance atelier - genius in the air, tons of talent on hand, cranking out, if not masterpieces, some unforgettable confections. Tons of bit part players in this one, it's as though they couldn't let anyone just walk on and act, the scene had to be chewed through. This sometimes seems distracting when you're caught up in the story, which, as with "Three on a Match," uses the threatened child to keep you in suspense. But with Lee Tracy and Ann D., plus all these superb faces and shticks, can anyone really complain? Worthwhile to think about why this Warner Bros. vision of life seems to get tremendous lift from exploiting a certain idea of the US press, never better represented than by Tracy - at least until Grant in "His Girl Friday."


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