A once great stage and screen actor (Henry B. Walthall) has fallen from fame because of his alcoholism; his young son (Leon Janney) is determined to see his father "make good" again.

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(scenario), (story)
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Cast

Cast overview:
...
Nat Barry
Leon Janney ...
Junior Barry
Lionel Belmore ...
Uncle Al Furman
King Baggot ...
Henry Field, Movie Director
...
Skid
Edmund Breese ...
Judge Robert Webster
...
Diana McCormick
Walter James ...
Cappy Hearn
Al Bridge ...
(as Alan Bridge)
Bud Osborne
Paul Panzer ...
Movie Actor
Natalie Joyce ...
Actress
Jack Richardson
Fred 'Snowflake' Toones ...
(as Fred Toones)
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Storyline

A once great stage and screen actor (Henry B. Walthall) has fallen from fame because of his alcoholism; his young son (Leon Janney) is determined to see his father "make good" again.

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Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

Passed
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Details

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Release Date:

20 February 1932 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Fame Street  »

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Runtime:

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Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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User Reviews

 
An All-Star Cast
19 November 2006 | by (New York City) – See all my reviews

That's how the credit reads at the start of the 1951 re-issue, and an all-star cast it is indeed, as a great cast of silent stars strut their stuff under the direction of Louis King in this variation of THE CHAMP, with Henry B. Walthall as an alcoholic ex-movie star and Leon Janney as his son. This cast knows how to play melodrama, and they do so in.... perhaps a little too well as perhaps a little more comedy relief might have helped -- or perhaps might have wrecked the emotional impact.

But Walthall is almost all of the show and he has some lovely scenes, particularly in the sequence where, back on the skids, and made up as Lincoln in a side show, he resists reciting the Gettysburg Address to sell patent medicine. The scenes on the movie set are also wonderful, with former real-life director King Baggott, playing a movie director performs his role efficiently and compassionately. But, as I said earlier, everyone is good here and the movie, while no classic, is well worth your time.


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