IMDb > The Most Dangerous Game (1932)
The Most Dangerous Game
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

The Most Dangerous Game (1932) More at IMDbPro »

Photos (See all 16 | slideshow)

Overview

User Rating:
7.3/10   5,833 votes »
Your Rating:
Saving vote...
Deleting vote...
/10   (delete | history)
Sorry, there was a problem
MOVIEmeter: ?
Up 3% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Writers:
Contact:
View company contact information for The Most Dangerous Game on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
16 September 1932 (USA) See more »
Plot:
An insane hunter arranges for a ship to be wrecked on an island where he can indulge in some sort of hunting and killing of the passengers. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
User Reviews:
The Night of the Hunter See more (82 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Joel McCrea ... Bob

Fay Wray ... Eve
Robert Armstrong ... Martin
Leslie Banks ... Zaroff
Noble Johnson ... Ivan
Steve Clemente ... Tartar (as Steve Clemento)
William B. Davidson ... Captain (as William Davidson)
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Oscar 'Dutch' Hendrian ... Tarter Servant (as Dutch Hendrian)

Buster Crabbe ... Sailor who falls off boat (uncredited)
James Flavin ... First Mate on Yacht (uncredited)
Arnold Gray ... Passenger on Yacht (uncredited)
Hale Hamilton ... Bill - Owner of Yacht (uncredited)
Landers Stevens ... 'Doc' - Passenger on Yacht (uncredited)
Phil Tead ... Passenger on Yacht (uncredited)
Create a character page for: ?

Directed by
Irving Pichel 
Ernest B. Schoedsack 
 
Writing credits
James Ashmore Creelman (screenplay)

Richard Connell (story)

Produced by
Merian C. Cooper .... associate producer
David O. Selznick .... executive producer
 
Original Music by
Max Steiner 
 
Cinematography by
Henry W. Gerrard (photographed by) (as Henry Gerrard)
 
Film Editing by
Archie Marshek  (as Archie E. Marshek)
 
Art Direction by
Carroll Clark 
 
Set Decoration by
Thomas Little (uncredited)
 
Costume Design by
Walter Plunkett (uncredited)
 
Makeup Department
Wally Westmore .... makeup artist (uncredited)
 
Art Department
John Cerisoli .... special props (uncredited)
Byron L. Crabbe .... art department technician (uncredited)
Marcel Delgado .... special props (uncredited)
Mario Larrinaga .... art department technician (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Clem Portman .... sound recordist
Murray Spivack .... sound effects (uncredited)
 
Special Effects by
Lloyd Knechtel .... photographic effects (uncredited)
Harry Redmond Jr. .... special effects (uncredited)
Vernon L. Walker .... photographic effects (uncredited)
 
Visual Effects by
Linwood G. Dunn .... optical effects (uncredited)
Orville Goldner .... miniatures (uncredited)
Donald Jahraus .... miniatures (uncredited)
Bud Thackery .... process photography (uncredited)
 
Stunts
Buster Crabbe .... stunt double: Joel McCrea (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Willard Barth .... assistant camera (uncredited)
Robert De Grasse .... camera operator (uncredited)
Gaston Longet .... still photographer (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Norma Drury Boleslavsky .... musician: piano (uncredited)
Emil Gerstenberger .... orchestrator (uncredited)
Bernhard Kaun .... orchestrator (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies
Create a character page for: ?

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
63 min | USA:78 min (preview version)
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (RCA Photophone System)
Certification:
Australia:PG | Canada:PG | Canada:G (Quebec) | Finland:K-16 (1987) | Finland:(Banned) (1934) | South Korea:12 | UK:A (cut) | UK:12 (re-rating) | USA:Not Rated | USA:Passed (National Board of Review) | USA:Approved (PCA #1348-R: 29 August 1935 for re-release) | USA:TV-PG (TV rating)
Filming Locations:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Some of the screams of the sailors as the ship sinks are the same as the screams of the sailors in King Kong (1933) when Kong shakes them off the log.See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: When Count Zaroff is first giving the knife to Rainsford, he is pointing the blade at him. There is a cut to a closer shot, and the blade is now facing away.See more »
Quotes:
[first lines]
Captain:The channel's here on the chart, all right, and so are the marking lights.
First mate:Then what's wrong with them?
Captain:Those lights don't seem to be in just the right place. They're both a bit out of position according to this.
First mate:Two light buoys means a safe channel between the world over!
Captain:"Safe between the world over" doesn't go in these waters.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
A Moment in the DarkSee more »

FAQ

Is this movie based on a book or previously released material?
See more »
47 out of 54 people found the following review useful.
The Night of the Hunter, 21 February 2005
Author: lugonian from Kissimmee, Florida

THE MOST DANGEROUS GAME (RKO Radio, 1932), directed by Ernest B. Schoedsack and Irving Pichel, from the short story by Richard Connell, is a highly suspenseful drama with a neat twist in theme. But for the benefit for those who have never read Connell's original story nor seen the movie, this is something to really consider, especially for action and adventure fans. Categorized as a horror film, the only horror is the thought of a hunter being the hunted, especially by a crazed individual.

The story begins with an explosion and the sinking of a yacht with Robert Rainsford (Joel McCrea) becoming the sole survivor of the perished crew. He swims to safety on a remote island and soon encounters an ancient mansion where lives the Russian Count Zoroff (Leslie Banks), and his muted servant, Ivan (Noble Johnson) and Tatur (Steve Clemento). After getting into some dry clothes, Rainsford is introduced to Zoroff's other guests, Eve (Fay Wray) and her brother, Martin Trowbridge (Robert Armstrong), also shipwreck survivors. Gathering in the living room, Zoroff discusses his interest in game hunting, but instead of hunting animals, which now bores him, he hunts his new interest - a most dangerous game. Later that night, Zoroff has made the drunken Martin his latest prey, and after returning from his all night hunt, Zoroff shows Eve and Rainsford his trophy room, consisting of human heads and corpses, with Martin's body being among them. Because Rainsford is a noted author and hunter, Zoroff wants him to go game hunting with him, the hunting of man. Refusing to take part in his mad scheme, Rainsford, in turn, becomes Zoroff's next prey. Zoroff promises that if Rainsford eludes him until sunrise, he and Eve are set free, and if he doesn't, gets to recapture Eve alive, since he doesn't hunt the "female animal." Being given a 12 hour head start for preparation, Rainsford, with Eve's help, works against time using his brains instead of his feet to try and outsmart the hunter, but after midnight, the hunt begins, with Zoroff's tracking them down with weapons ranging from bow and arrow, rifle, and, as the last resort, the release of his vicious dogs, climaxed by surprises for both hunter and the hunted.

THE MOST DANGEROUS GAME ranks one of the very best stories ever transferred on screen. In spite of alterations to Connell's original story, such as adding a female to accompany Rainsford, this adaptation is a fast-pace 65 minutes that never lets up for a minute. The first half hour devotes itself to character study, with Robert Armstrong's drunken performance somewhat slowing down the pace instead of providing humor. However, second half of the movie is tight on suspense, with the camera capturing every move and reaction from the three central characters, with Max Steiner's underscoring setting the mood and pace. Of course there's plenty of close calls and near misses to add to the excitement, making this a well staged and truly memorable experience after it is all over. What makes THE MOST DANGEROUSGAME worthy is the uncanny performance of British actor Leslie Banks, in his Hollywood debut, hamming it up to perfection, making his insane hunter come to life as intended by the author. Closeups of his eyes during the hunt is truly effective. If the jungle settings look familiar, it's the same set used for the much more famous adventure, KING KONG (RKO, 1933), that also features Fay Wray and Robert Armstrong.

While Joel McCrea has been on screen since the silent era, starting from small roles to the elevation of leads, THE MOST DANGEROUS GAME showcases him to best advantage, but cannot take away from the performance of Leslie Banks. While never a high rank leading man, McCrea did become a Hollywood survivor, better known for westerns, retiring from his successful career by 1962.

THE MOST DANGEROUS GAME was remade as A GAME OF DEATH (RKO, 1945) with John Loder and Edgar Barrier; RUN FOR THE SUN (United Artists, 1956) with Richard Widmark, and recycled numerous times, but none have captured the greatness to the 1932 original. It's also interesting to note that the theme was used as the basis in one of the better episodes to the comedy series, GILLIGAN'S ISLAND, titled "The Hunter" with Rory Calhoun guest starring as the title character who hunts people, namely Gilligan (Bob Denver).

Once regarded a "lost" movie, a print of THE MOST DANGEROUS GAME was discovered in the 1970s, and introduced to the small screen for the first time on public television in 1976. Prints shown in its initial premiere were crystal clear, but sadly, by the early 1980s, in the wake of home video, transfers circulated by distributors had that third to fourth generation look. A public domain title, it's unfortunate that a movie as good as this couldn't be available with better better picture quality. Aside from TV showings on various cable channels such as Nostalgia Television, and currently on some public TV stations after the midnight hours, THE MOST DANGEROUS GAME had yet to be shown on any commercial free classic movie channels until Turner Classic Movies aired it on June 28, 2007, but because of its reputation, continues to circulate in the VHS and DVD markets to a very favorable audience. An instant classic not to be missed. (***)

Was the above review useful to you?
See more (82 total) »

Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for The Most Dangerous Game (1932)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
I'm remaking this film silentspider89
The Ship Explosion Alex-1678
Remake? Azero18
What A Movie!!!!!!! thompson62208
Just read the original story... StabeFloyd
The Zodiac Killer and The Most Dangerous Game thefife-1
See more »

Recommendations

If you enjoyed this title, our database also recommends:
- - - - -
King Kong The Secret of Treasure Island Canadian Mounties vs. Atomic Invaders Avatar Beowulf
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
Show more recommendations

Related Links

Full cast and crew Company credits External reviews
News articles IMDb Adventure section IMDb USA section

You may report errors and omissions on this page to the IMDb database managers. They will be examined and if approved will be included in a future update. Clicking the 'Edit page' button will take you through a step-by-step process.