Anita Ragusa, the daughter of a costume company owner, delivers a dress for a costume ball at the last minute. The snobbish customer doesn't like the design at first, but agrees to let ... See full summary »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
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Anita Ragusa
Adrian Rosley ...
Mr. Ragusa
Barbara Child ...
Carolyn Belmont
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Charlie - the Chauffeur
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Storyline

Anita Ragusa, the daughter of a costume company owner, delivers a dress for a costume ball at the last minute. The snobbish customer doesn't like the design at first, but agrees to let Anita model it for her to decide whether to keep it. Charlie, a drunk partygoer, sees Anita in the dress and invites her to attend the festivities. She reluctantly agrees and sings for the other guests. Written by David Glagovsky <dglagovsky@verizon.net>

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Genres:

Comedy | Musical | Short

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Release Date:

5 November 1932 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Broadway Brevities (1932-1933 season) #5: A Modern Cinderella  »

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1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Vitaphone Production Reels #1460-1461. See more »

Soundtracks

Dinah
Music by Harry Akst
Performed by unidentified tap dancing duo
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User Reviews

Interesting Vitaphone Short
20 July 2009 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

I've seen a number of Ruth Etting shorts and have never really understood what was so great about her. She was a below-par actress and a passable singer. She certainly is not the singer that Doris Day portrays in "Love Me or Leave Me". In this short, she portrays the daughter of an Italian tailor who must deliver a gown to a socialite for a party. At the party, she is asked to sing. This is where we get her two musical numbers. The comedy in this short is mild at best and the supporting players do not add much. Ruth Etting does not give anything to her role; she is not funny and it seems that she is reading her dialog. I suppose her poor acting kept her in shorts and in guest spots in features. The Brooklyn Vitaphone short subject unit was never a great studio for comedy. They tried, but they rarely succeeded. They did not use Bob Hope properly and gave Shemp Howard some very bad material. This is just another in the series of comedy misfires from Vitaphone.


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