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The Murdock's bank is in trouble. So they ship money on the train and rob it to get back the money plus the insurance, Bonner and his two pals recover the money only to be thrown in jail.

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(story "All for Love"), (screenplay) (as Phil White)
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Cast

Cast overview:
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Marion Meade
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Joe Murdock
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Ben Murdock
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Sheriff Hickory (as Edward Peil)
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Railroad Station-Agent Andrew McKee (as Jack Clifford)
Skeeter Bill Robbins ...
Skeeter Cole (as 'Skeeter Bill' Robbins)
Milton Brown ...
Horsetail Wright (as Milt Brown)
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Storyline

The Murdock's bank is in trouble. So they ship money on the train and rob it to get back the money plus the insurance, Bonner and his two pals recover the money only to be thrown in jail. Written by Maurice VanAuken <mvanauken@a1access.net>

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Certificate:

Passed
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Details

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Release Date:

15 January 1932 (USA)  »

Box Office

Budget:

$60,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(RCA Photophone)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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User Reviews

 
A lot better than the average B-western.
28 December 2011 | by (Bradenton, Florida) – See all my reviews

Hoot Gibson was an odd film star during the 1930s. While the silent era seemed to have its share of ordinary looking western heroes (William S. Hart is a great example) and he was a big star in the 20s, the 1930s and 40s saw a proliferation of a new sort of cowboy hero--the pretty guy who, in many cases, loved to sing. Yet, unlike the likes of Roy Rogers, Hoot Gibson continued making films despite being a very ordinary looking guy--and he never sang a note in any of the films I have seen. To make up for this lack of flash, many of Gibson's films have a dash of humor tossed in and the results stack up very well to the pretty-boy films of the era--and, in my opinion, are a bit better.

Here in "The Local Bad Man", Hoot plays an odd role--the community hot-head. While he isn't evil he does have more than his share of brushes with the law. Because of this and his reputation for a man who hates the railroads, two evil jerks decide to frame him for a train robbery in order to hide all the funds they've misappropriated from the bank. Can Hoot stop them before it's too late AND get the girl? Tune in and see.

Gibson once again turns in a likable performance as his 'everyman hero'--the sort of guy folks in the audience could relate to and possibly become. In addition, nice dialog and some good action (Hoot appears to be doing his own stunts--some of which look pretty dangerous) make this a fun outing. Not a brilliant film by any stretch, but far, far better than you'd expect from yet another low-budget B-western. Worth a look.


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