The Dale's need money for their sick mother and Bart Travis, having found gold, says he will provide it. Duke Remsden learns of the strike and waylays Buzz Dale as he tries to record Bart's... See full summary »

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Cast

Cast overview:
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Pauline Parker ...
Nellie Dale
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Bart Travis
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Duke Remsden (as Edward Cobb)
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Sheriff (as Franklin Farnum)
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Deputy
Nanci Price ...
Marjorie
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The Doctor
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Snowflake (as Fred Toones)
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Storyline

The Dale's need money for their sick mother and Bart Travis, having found gold, says he will provide it. Duke Remsden learns of the strike and waylays Buzz Dale as he tries to record Bart's deed. Then dressed as Bart, Duke kills and robs a man. With the Sheriff after Bart, Buzz escapes capture, finds the clothes worn to impersonate Bart, and heads for the Sheriff. Written by Maurice VanAuken <mvanauken@a1access.net>

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dog | rin tin tin | See All (2) »

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Western

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Release Date:

10 January 1932 (USA)  »

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1.37 : 1
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Trivia

This film was believed to be lost. See more »

Soundtracks

Ain't Going Back No More
Sung by Fred 'Snowflake' Toones
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User Reviews

 
clunky early-sound western with weak leading characters
7 June 2005 | by (south Texas USA) – See all my reviews

As the previous reviewer stated, despite the title, this is not an animal film. Human stars Buzz Barton (a teen) and Francis X. Bushman Jr. don't have much presence, and the continuity is confusing. There is a good supporting cast (Edmund Cobb, John Ince, and the unforgettable Black actor Fred "Snowflake" Toones, who sings a country song (and well, too!) in one scene, and tries to out-Stepin Stepin Fetchit in the rest of the film), but not much else to offer. I've been watching some of director J.P. McGowan's late-silent films recently, and at his best he's quite efficient and creates a good pace with some interesting shots, but this must have been a for-hire job that he wasn't really into very much. As a fan of low-budget indie westerns of the early 30's, I'd put this is the lowest 25% of early-sound westerns. It may not be lost, but it's not worth finding or spending the time to watch.


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