A stage hand is knocked out and has a dream of becoming monarch of a Graustarkian kingdom, rife with court intrigue, an assassination plot and operetta-style musical numbers.

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Writers:

(story), (adaptation)
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
George Wallace ...
Tommy Dodds / King of Betonia
Byrl Walkley ...
Yoiben
Frank Tarrant ...
Hozzan
Donalda Warne ...
Barbette
Lou Vernon ...
Torano
Marshall Crosby ...
Alfam
John Fernside ...
Giuseppe
Nell Taylor ...
Molly
John Dobbie ...
Jim
...
(as Mona Barlee)
Clem Milton ...
Prime Minister
Edwin Brett ...
Asher Marmaduke
Billy Maloney
Dan Thomas ...
Asher Marmaduke
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Storyline

A stage hand is knocked out and has a dream of becoming monarch of a Graustarkian kingdom, rife with court intrigue, an assassination plot and operetta-style musical numbers.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

royalty | slapstick | See All (2) »

Genres:

Musical | Comedy

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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

26 August 1932 (Australia)  »

Also Known As:

His Loyal Highness  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

(RCA Photophone Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

When Tommy is gambling with the servants, the terms 'bob' and 'quid' are mentioned. A 'bob' is slang for a shilling and a 'quid' is slang for a pound. Twenty shillings equal one pound. See more »

Soundtracks

Your Majesty
(uncredited)
Written by Alaric Howitt and George Wallace
Sung by George Wallace, Nell Taylor, Lou Vernon, Marshall Crosby and the cast
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User Reviews

 
The once and future King of Betonia
24 August 2012 | by (Buffalo, New York) – See all my reviews

Given that the Australian film industry was in its toddler stage, I'd like to rate the film a bit higher. But as it is His Royal Highness is a good exposition to the comedy talents of George Wallace who apparently was to Australia as Maurice Chevalier to France and Sir Harry Lauder to Scotland. A kind of roving ambassador of entertainment for his country during his prime.

It's a simple film in structure and plot. Wallace plays a guy who nabs someone else's job as a stagehand at a theater and proceeds to muck it up. When the first guy comes back, he clunks Wallace on the head and Wallace dreams he's the lost king in some Ruritanian type country.

I saw bits of a few entertainers in Wallace's style. A little of Lou Costello, a little of Stanley Holloway, a little of Sir Harry Lauder. Mostly he was like an Aussie version of Eddie Cantor in his patter and in his singing and dancing. He was popular Down Under, but very few know him north of the equator.

His Royal Highness is a pleasing enough film and even though Americans might not get some of the Australian idiom you'll find a few laughs in it if not production values associated with Hollywood.


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