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Edgar Wright’s 100 Favorite Horror Movies, From ‘Nosferatu’ to ‘The Witch’

Edgar Wright’s 100 Favorite Horror Movies, From ‘Nosferatu’ to ‘The Witch’
Your ultimate Halloween horror movie binge is here. Edgar Wright has joined forces with Mubi to list his 100 favorite horror movies, and the collection is full of classics and surprising choices that range from 1922 to 2016. The director, who himself has given the genre a classic title thanks to “Shaun of the Dead,” names recent horror hits like “Raw,” “The Witch,” and “Train to Busan,” as well as classics from horror masters James Whale and Mario Bava.

Read More:Edgar Wright’s 40 Favorite Movies Ever Made (Right Now): ‘Boogie Nights,’ ‘Suspiria’ and More

Wright wrote an introduction to his list, in which he makes it clear this is simply a list of 100 favorite titles and not his definitive list of the best horror films ever. You can read Wright’s statement below:

Here, for Halloween, is a chronological list of my favorite horror movies. It’s not in any way
See full article at Indiewire »

Adele Hints She May Never Tour Again: It 'Isn't Something I'm Good At'

Adele Hints She May Never Tour Again: It 'Isn't Something I'm Good At'
Agree to disagree, Adele!

The "Hello" singer could be saying "goodbye" to touring after completing her massive global trek this year, telling the crowd at her Auckland, New Zealand, performance on Sunday that "touring isn't something I'm good at."

"Applause makes me feel a bit vulnerable," she explained during the rain-soaked show, packed with 40,000 fans. "I don't know if I will ever tour again. The only reason I've toured is you. I'm not sure if touring is my bag. My greatest accomplishment in my career is this tour."

Rightfully so! When Adele's current tour wraps with four sold-out shows at Wembley Stadium in her native London this summer, she will have performed more than 120 shows spanning three continents since kicking off in February 2016.

Watch: Adele Hilariously Freaks Out Over a Mosquito While Performing 

While she's certainly earned a break, Adele also seems to have expressed interest in expanding her family. The 28-year-old
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Adele Goes Makeup-Free to Meet Elmo -- See the Pic!

Adele is flaunting her natural beauty!

The 28-year-old singer took to Instagram on Friday to share a fresh-faced photo with none other than Elmo

Related: Adele Hilariously Freaks Out Over a Mosquito While Performing in Australia: 'It Was Sucking My Blood'

"Elmo, I love you. Thanks for coming, See you in New York X," Adele captioned the pic.

Related: Adele Cancels Concert Fireworks After Her Son Angelo Is Injured by Debris

The meeting was a dream come true for Elmo, who spent the week reaching out to the singer on Twitter and TV.

"Adele! Elmo loves you with all of Elmo's heart. Elmo wants to sing 'Rolling In the Deep' with you, wherever you are. Elmo will fly there. Call Elmo! Thank you," he said on the Australian TV show The Project on Wednesday right before singing "Rolling In the Deep."

"Miss @Adele, Elmo's been wondering if after all these years you'd like to
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Maleficent's Robert Stromberg to direct new slasher film

Tony Sokol Feb 13, 2017

Robert Stromberg is going from Disney's Malificent to a new slasher movie called Carnival...

The upcoming noir slasher film Carnival is about a knife-throwing artist performing at a traveling circus. But the barnstorming blade buff is not the villain, he is the hunter. In the tradition of Tod Browning’s Freaks, Alejandro Jodorowsky's Santa Sangre, Hammer’s Vampire Circus and Halloween perennial Carnival Of Souls, Carnival will be a three-ringed affair.

Carnival will be directed by Robert Stromberg, the Oscar-winning production designer who made Maleficent (2014) with Angelina Jolie as the sympathetic, malicious witch. Stromberg was the first production designer to ever win back-to- back Oscars, for Avatar and Alice In Wonderland. He turned the lonely journey of astronaut Mark Watney (Matt Damon) from Ridley Scott’s The Martian into The Martian: Vr Experience, which was released at Sundance last year. Stromberg also directed the pilot Dawn for Hulu and MGM.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Film Review: ‘Indivisible’

Film Review: ‘Indivisible’
“I feel like I’m dreaming,” says young Dasy to her sister Viola over halfway into “Indivisible”, and it’s a sentiment likely to be echoed by audiences. A subtle, appealing and slightly unreal Neopolitan fable that unfolds with the often brutal logic of a fairytale, Edoardo De Angelis’s conjoined-twins drama has the feel of updated folklore — a Brothers Grimm classic, perhaps — relocated to contemporary Italy. While hardly a picture with blockbuster pretensions, a modest post-festival life on the arthouse circuit seems entirely possible, since despite its neo-gothic trappings the narrative is at heart warm and accessible.

Dasy and Viola (presumably named for real-life English conjoined twins Daisy and Violet Hilton, who were exploited by various handlers and went on to appear in Tod Browning’s 1932 classic “Freaks”) are played by debut performers Angela and Marianna Fontana. The young actors are identical twins: Unlike their onscreen characters, they are not conjoined,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Lumière Festival: Walt Disney’s ‘Alice Comedies’ Being Restored, Distributed by France’s Malavida

Lyon, France — Walt Disney’s “Alice Comedies,” a series of cartoons made before Disney went to Hollywood, have been freshly restored and re-packaged for global distribution by France’s Malavida Films, one of the specialty cinema companies announcing their 2017 lineups at Lyon’s Lumière festival vintage cinema market.

Disney made the silent shorts starting in 1923 when he was still a struggling cartoon filmmaker in Kansas City. They feature a young girl named Alice, originally played by Virginia Davis, who interacts with animated characters. Local company Laugh-o-gram Films produced them and subsequently went bust. Now they are in the public domain.

“These are the only films in the Disney catalogue that are not copyrighted,” said Malavida co-chief Lionel Ithurralde.

Malavida is a niche vintage arthouse movies outfit whose upcoming French releases include several works by British director Derek Jarman, including his 1976 drama “Sebastiane,” the first film ever shot in Latin.

Malavida
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Indivisible Review [Lff 2016]

Dasy and Viola are teenage siblings who’re joined at the hip. And no, that’s not a metaphor. From Stuck on You all the way back to Todd Browning’s classic Freaks, conjoined twins have long proved fertile ground for cinema. Edoardo De Angelis’ Indivisible joins them, taking us on a subtly surreal tour of Italy’s grimy industrial south: a grimy land of burning trash and abandoned warehouses, populated by a gallery of grotesques eager to get their claws into Dasy and Viola (Angela and Marianna Fontana).

Blessed with both beauty and perfect harmony, the twins are breadwinners for their extended family – available to hire for children’s parties, weddings, baptisms and so on. Scumbag father Peppe (Massimiliano Rossi) is their Svengali, providing them with a songbook full of treacly pop songs, most of which are about the importance of unity and/or female submission.

Also on board
See full article at We Got This Covered »

The Most Memorable Monsters at Guillermo del Toro’s Lacma Exhibit

The Most Memorable Monsters at Guillermo del Toro’s Lacma Exhibit
If beauty is in the eye of the beholder, then Guillermo del Toro’s new exhibit at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art is sure to please viewers with an eye for the macabre. Titled “Guillermo del Toro: At Home with Monsters,” the show runs from August 1 until November 27, and will travel to co-organizing museums in Minneapolis and Ontario next year. Containing almost 600 eerie objects from the filmmaker’s private collection — including sculptures, paintings, costumes and books — the exhibition reflects his lifelong obsession with monsters.

“You can see my movies over and over again, and you will see that I adore monsters. I absolutely love them,” del Toro said at Saturday’s preview, adding “I think humans are pretty repulsive!”

Though he doesn’t consider himself a horror filmmaker these days, del Toro’s Lacma exhibit is filled with the type of ghoulish artifacts most often associated with a Fangoria convention.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Qt’s AFI Commencement Speech, Almodóvar’s Inspirations, Nyaff 2016 Trailer & More

Dailies is a round-up of essential film writing, news bits, videos, and other highlights from across the Internet. If you’d like to submit a piece for consideration, get in touch with us in the comments below or on Twitter at @TheFilmStage.

Watch a clip from Quentin Tarantino‘s commencement speech at AFI this year:

Catherine Deneuve will receive the 2016 Lumière Award and Alejandro Jodorowsky will get the Locarno Film Festival’s Leopard of Honor.

At BFI, Pedro Almodóvar on 13 great Spanish films that inspired him, and watch a video on his use of circles:

Blancanieves is one of the peaks in recent Spanish cinema, but had the bad luck to be released a year after The Artist (2011), a silent film that triumphed the world over. Pablo Berger had in fact decided years earlier to film his personal take on the Brothers Grimm fairytale as a black-and-white silent; the result is heartrendingly beautiful.
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘Sisters’: Brian De Palma’s Gleefully Twisted Exploitation Tale

Brian De Palma‘s shocking exploitation gut-punch, Sisters, is a perfectly orchestrated exercise in style, a staging of some of the finest suspense sequences since Alfred Hitchcock was above ground. Channeling the Master of Suspense’s gleeful enjoyment of audience manipulation, De Palma remarkably employs a trashy genre aesthetic to satirically explore issues of race and social alienation. It’s a film about outsiders — a starkly disturbing reminder that looks and appearances can be dangerously deceiving — that’s nevertheless less interested in soap-box statements than inducing audiences to squeal and squirm. Grim in its contemporary relevance, De Palma and co-writer Louisa Rose‘s political satire is ever-present but far from overt, quietly bubbling in the background. This is a film in which police officers respond to learning of the stabbing of an African-American man by hatefully grumbling, “Those people are always stabbing each other.”

The film’s opening scene launches
See full article at The Film Stage »

Release Details & Cover Art for Basket Case 2 and Basket Case 3: The Progeny Blu-rays

The continued adventures of Duane Bradley and his sinister twin brother are getting the high-def treatment, as Synapse Films announced that they will release Basket Case 2 and Basket Case 3: The Progeny on respective Blu-rays this August:

Press Release: Double your freaky fun with Frank Henenlotter’s Basket Case 2 and Basket Case 3: The Progeny on Blu-ray this August from Synapse Films!

1982’s Basket Case introduced horror fans to Duane Bradley and his twin brother Belial, and a new horror classic was born. They also introduced the world to Frank Henenlotter, the uniquely crazed talent who would later give us Brain Damage and Frankenhooker. In 1990 and ‘91, Henenlotter and star Kevin Van Hentenryck returned for two even more demented sequels, both coming to Blu-ray from Synapse Films this August, each at the low price of $19.95!

Basket Case 2

Basket Case 2 is a hilarious genre spoof… paying homage to Tod Browning’s 1932 classic,
See full article at DailyDead »

Ten Tod Browning Films Airing on Turner Classics January 25th

Attention classic movie freaks – Set your DVR for this Monday!!!!

Tod Browning (1880-1962) was a pioneering director who helped establish the horror film genre. Born in Louisville Kentucky, Browning ran away to join the circus at an early age which influenced his later career in Hollywood and echoes of those years can be found in many of his films. Though best known as the director of the first sound version of Dracula starring Bela Lugosi in 1931, Browning made his mark on cinema in the silent era with his extraordinary 10-film collaboration with actor Lon Chaney, the ‘Man of a Thousand Faces’. Despite the success of Dracula, and the boost it gave his career, Browning’s chief interest continued to lie not in films dealing with the supernatural but in films that dealt with the grotesque and strange, earning him the reputation as “the Edgar Allan Poe of the cinema”. Browning
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Sliff 2015: Tribute to Tod Browning This Friday – The Unknown and Freaks

“Gooble-gobble, gooble-gobble, we accept her, we accept her, one of us, one of us.”

Cinema St. Louis presents a Tribute to Tod Browning Friday November 13th at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium as part of this year’s St. Louis International Film Festival. The program includes a 35mm screening of Browning’s 1927 silent shocker The Unknown with live music by The Rats and People Motion Picture Orchestra followed by a screening of Browning’s 1932 masterpiece Freaks. The event begins at 7:30pm and will be hosted by We Are Movie Geeks own Tom Stockman. Ticket information can be found Here

Tod Browning (1880-1962) was a pioneering director who helped establish the horror film genre. Born in Louisville Kentucky, Browning ran away to join the circus at an early age which influenced his later career in Hollywood and echoes of those years can be found in many of his films. Though
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

A Fiend’s Guide to the 2015 St. Louis International Film Festival

The 2015 St. Louis International Film Festival, also known as Sliff, has begun. Even though Alex Winter couldn’t bring Freaked in town, he did bring his two great tech documentaries, Downloaded and Deep Web – in addition to being awesome to us and presenting Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure. Sliff has a robust schedule full of independent and foreign cinema along with some mainstream affair like Legend starring Tom Hardy and some possible future Oscar contenders like Carol. However, since we are a horror website, we are going to highlight some films that should definitely be on your radar!

Feature Films

The Nameless

Filmed in “The Exorcist House” here in St. Louis, which most of you might have seen last weekend during Discovery Channel’s laughable Exorcism: Live!, this thriller borrows from the premise that The Exorcist was based out of by having a main character, Amy, return to the house
See full article at Destroy the Brain »

Sliff 2015 Interview: Alex Winter – Actor and Director of Deep Web

Director Alex Winter’s Deep Web screens at The St. Louis International Film Festival Thursday, November 5th at 7:30. Winter will be in attendance and will receive a Lifetime Achievement Award. Ticket information for that event can be found Here. Alex Winter will also attend a screening of Bill And Ted’S Excellent Adventure, the 1989 comedy which he co-starred in along with Keanu Reeves and George Carlin at The Tivoli Theater Friday, November 6th at 9:30. Ticket information for that event can be found Here. Finally, Winter will attend a screening of his 2013 documentary Downloaded Saturday November 7th at 4:30 pm at The Tivoli Theater. Ticket information for that event can be found Here.

Winter is coming to St. Louis! The St. Louis International Film Festival honors former St. Louisan Alex Winter, whose varied career includes acting on stage and in film, and directing both narratives and documentaries. Winter’s new film Deep Web,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

200 Greatest Horror Films (40-31)

Special Mention: The Most Dangerous Game

Directed by Irving Pichel and Ernest B. Schoedsack

Written by James Creelman

USA, 1932

Genre: Survival Horror

The first of many official and unofficial screen versions of Richard Connell’s short story of the same name, The Most Dangerous Game was made in 1932, in the era known as “Pre-Code Hollywood,” a time when filmmakers were able to get away with sexual innuendo, illegal drug use, adultery, abortion, intense violence, homosexuality, and much more. It was during this time that a film like The Most Dangerous Game was allowed to be made and shown to the general public without fear of censorship. The film was put together by producer Willis O’Brien while in pre-production on King Kong, and features several of the same cast and crew members, as well as props and sets from Kong. Despite these obvious cost-cutting measures, Dangerous Game never feels like a second-rate production,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Tribute To Tod Browning at Sliff November 13th – The Unknown and Freaks

“Gooble-gobble, gooble-gobble, we accept her, we accept her, one of us, one of us.”

Cinema St. Louis presents a Tribute to Tod Browning Friday November 13th at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium as part of this year’s St. Louis International Film Festival. The program includes a 35mm screening of Browning’s 1927 silent shocker The Unknown with live music by The Rats and People Motion Picture Orchestra followed by a screening of Browning’s 1932 masterpiece Freaks. The event begins at 7pm and will be hosted by We Are Movie Geeks own Tom Stockman

Tod Browning (1880-1962) was a pioneering director who helped establish the horror film genre. Born in Louisville Kentucky, Browning ran away to join the circus at an early age which influenced his later career in Hollywood and echoes of those years can be found in many of his films. Though best known as the director of the
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Blu-ray Review: The Sentinel

  • DailyDead
The Sentinel was released in 1977 to a bit of controversy over director Michael Winner's decision to use real sideshow oddities for his film's conclusion—a move no filmmaker had the balls to do since Tod Browning in 1932's Freaks. Based on the 1974 novel of the same name by Jeffrey Konvitz, The Sentinel is a horror film anomaly, one that simply has to be seen to believe how truly insane it is.

The Sentinel centers on a fashion model who moves into an apartment building that happens to be a portal to Hell. The portal is secretly guarded by deprived priests and occupied by eccentric neighbors who like to host extravagant birthday parties for their pet cats, as well as a mute Beverly D'Angelo who expresses her sexuality during an awkward visit with her new neighbor over friendly morning coffee.

Starring Cristina Raines and Chris Sarandon (Fright Night), The Sentinel
See full article at DailyDead »

Forgotten Actress Bruce on TCM: Career Went from Dawn of Talkies to L.A.'s Punk Rock Scene

Virginia Bruce: MGM actress ca. 1935. Virginia Bruce movies on TCM: Actress was the cherry on 'The Great Ziegfeld' wedding cake Unfortunately, Turner Classic Movies has chosen not to feature any non-Hollywood stars – or any out-and-out silent film stars – in its 2015 “Summer Under the Stars” series.* On the other hand, TCM has come up with several unusual inclusions, e.g., Lee J. Cobb, Warren Oates, Mae Clarke, and today, Aug. 25, Virginia Bruce. A second-rank MGM leading lady in the 1930s, the Minneapolis-born Virginia Bruce is little remembered today despite her more than 70 feature films in a career that spanned two decades, from the dawn of the talkie era to the dawn of the TV era, in addition to a handful of comebacks going all the way to 1981 – the dawn of the personal computer era. Career highlights were few and not all that bright. Examples range from playing the
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

What Would Walt Disney Say? Banksy Comes Up with the Theme Park to End All Theme Parks

Dismaland Castle and Big Little Mermaid suffering from split-personality disorder. Dismaland: Banksy and more than 50 other artists create bemusement theme park Who gives a damn about the cheap thrills to be offered by the Star Wars-themed expansion of Disneyland when you can relish the thought-provoking wonders of Dismaland? The artist Banksy, whose 2010 documentary feature Exit Through the Gift Shop was nominated for an Academy Award, has come up with his latest revolutionary artwork: a theme park for the bemusement of the whole family! Or perhaps not quite the whole family. Banksy calls his 2.5-acre art show a “family theme park unsuitable for small children.” Another Dismaland plus. Its construction shrouded in secrecy, Dismaland opened today, Aug. 20, '15, on the sea front at Weston-super-Mare, in Somerset, southwest England. While the theme park was being built, locals believed that the work going on at the derelict Tropicana “lido” – shut down in
See full article at Alt Film Guide »
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