IMDb > Blonde Venus (1932)
Blonde Venus
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Blonde Venus (1932) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

User Rating:
7.3/10   2,575 votes »
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Writers:
Jules Furthman (written by) and
S.K. Lauren (written by)
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Blonde Venus on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
25 November 1932 (France) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
From the lips of one MAN to the arms of another! See more »
Plot:
A cabaret singer takes up with a millionaire to pay for her gravely ill husband's operation. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
NewsDesk:
(19 articles)
Waste Land | 2014 Tiff Review
 (From ioncinema. 6 September 2014, 8:30 PM, PDT)

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 (From SoundOnSight. 3 September 2014, 8:24 PM, PDT)

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User Reviews:
fun part of the series See more (42 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Marlene Dietrich ... Helen Faraday, aka Helen Jones
Herbert Marshall ... Edward 'Ned' Faraday

Cary Grant ... Nick Townsend

Dickie Moore ... Johnny Faraday
Gene Morgan ... Ben Smith
Rita La Roy ... Taxi Belle Hooper
Robert Emmett O'Connor ... Dan O'Connor

Sidney Toler ... Detective Wilson
Morgan Wallace ... Dr. Pierce
rest of cast listed alphabetically:

Clarence Muse ... Charlie, the Bartender (unconfirmed)
Eric Alden ... Guard (uncredited)
Harold Berquist ... Big Fellow (uncredited)
Al Bridge ... Bouncer (uncredited)
Glen Cavender ... Ship's Officer (uncredited)
Emile Chautard ... Chautard, French Nightclub Manager (uncredited)
Davison Clark ... Bartender Bringing Two Beers (uncredited)
Marcelle Corday ... Helen's Maid in France (uncredited)
Cecil Cunningham ... Norfolk Woman Manager (uncredited)
Clifford Dempsey ... Judge in Paris Nightclub Talking to Nick (uncredited)
Bess Flowers ... Minor Role (uncredited)
Mary Gordon ... Landlady (uncredited)
Robert Graves ... La Farge (uncredited)

Sterling Holloway ... Joe, Hiker (uncredited)
Elsa Janssen ... Gossip (uncredited)
James Kilgannon ... Janitor (uncredited)
Brady Kline ... New Orleans Policeman (uncredited)
Bessie Lyle ... Grace (uncredited)

Hattie McDaniel ... Cora, Helen's Maid in New Orleans (uncredited)
Charles Morton ... Bob (uncredited)
Dennis O'Keefe ... Minor Role (uncredited)
Evelyn Preer ... Viola (uncredited)
Dewey Robinson ... Greek Restaurant Owner (uncredited)
Francis Sayles ... Charlie Blaine (uncredited)
Ferdinand Schumann-Heink ... Henry (uncredited)
Gertrude Short ... Receptionist (uncredited)
Pat Somerset ... Companion (uncredited)
Larry Steers ... Hotel Manager in Baltimore (uncredited)
Kent Taylor ... Minor Role (uncredited)
Jerry Tucker ... Otto (uncredited)
Mildred Washington ... Viola, the Maid (uncredited)
Lloyd Whitlock ... Baltimore Manager (uncredited)

Directed by
Josef von Sternberg 
 
Writing credits
Jules Furthman (written by) and
S.K. Lauren (written by)

Jules Furthman  story (uncredited)
Josef von Sternberg  story (uncredited)

Produced by
Josef von Sternberg .... producer (uncredited)
 
Original Music by
W. Franke Harling (uncredited)
John Leipold (uncredited)
Paul Marquardt (uncredited)
Oscar Potoker (uncredited)
 
Cinematography by
Bert Glennon 
 
Film Editing by
Josef von Sternberg 
 
Art Direction by
Wiard Ihnen (uncredited)
 
Costume Design by
Travis Banton (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Harry D. English .... sound (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Lucien Ballard .... assistant camera (uncredited)
Neal Beckner .... assistant camera (uncredited)
Don English .... still photographer (uncredited)
Paul Ivano .... additional camera operator (uncredited)
Benny Mayer .... camera operator (uncredited)
William Rand .... camera operator (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Charles Gemora .... gorilla costume creator (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Heinrich Heine .... poet: "Gruss (Leise zeiht durch mein Gemüth ") (uncredited)
Andrea Palma .... Miss Dietrich's hats (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
93 min | West Germany:85 min (video: cut version)
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Western Electric Noiseless Recording)
Certification:
Spain:18 | UK:A (original rating) | UK:PG (re-rating) (1987) | USA:Passed | USA:Passed (National Board of Review) | USA:TV-14 (TV rating) | West Germany:16

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Evelyn Brent was an early choice for the part of Taxi Belle hooper.See more »
Quotes:
Taxi Belle Hooper:So you're the Blonde Venus. Don't tell me you thought of that label all by yourself.
Helen Faraday, aka Helen Jones:No. Mister O'Connor told me it would help me in my work.
Taxi Belle Hooper:He would. He didn't have to think up any name for me when I put this dump on the map. My name's Taxi Belle Hooper. Taxi for short.
Helen Faraday, aka Helen Jones:Do you charge for the first mile?
Taxi Belle Hooper:Say, you trying' to ride me? Don't get the wrong idea. They call me Taxi because I won't ride in nothin' else. Safety first, that's my motto. Good drinking partners always make bad drivers... Do I charge for the first mile?
See more »
Soundtrack:
Sidewalks of New YorkSee more »

FAQ

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17 out of 24 people found the following review useful.
fun part of the series, 13 March 2004
Author: notmicro from Seattle

This is the 5th of the 7 legendary collaborations between Dietrich and von Sternberg, and the only one set in the U.S. (the other 6 are set in Germany, Morocco, Europe, China, Russia, and Spain). All of the principals, including the director, were born in Europe. For some reason it is my personal favorite, and the only one I enjoy watching repeatedly. Probably this is for the outrageous musical numbers, which display Dietrich's incredibly self-assured command of her environment (what can top "Hot Voodoo", but I really really love the glittering white top-hat and tails number particularly). This would have been the only time during filming that von Sternberg could not totally exercise his robotic direction of her; she gets to be more "herself" as a real performer, and her energy-level comes way up. Also I'd venture that since the story is set in the U.S. it makes it more challenging to present her as "exotic" (as opposed to, say, China). I love how von Sternberg plays her character's flight South, into increasingly lurid, run-down, and crude environments. The technical side of movie-making had made huge strides; film-stock was becoming much more uniform and high-contrast, and sound-recording had improved greatly in just a few years; von Sternberg was able to make full use of this. The film feels snappy and tightly-paced, and has mostly abandoned silent-film mannerisms.

In comparison to their next 2 films, this one feels quite grounded. The subsequent "Scarlett Empress" and "Devil is a Woman" would be increasingly baroque and outrageous excursions into fantastic style, excess, and European decadence, which kind of left their American audiences in the dust - and helped Dietrich land on the infamous "box-office poison" list.

This is a pre-Code film, and it routinely tweaks conventional morals. The nightclub in which Dietrich goes to work is clearly a high-class "speakeasy"; Prohibition was still in effect at the time. Also, its always a bit confusing for modern audiences when dollar-amounts are mentioned in old films. The personal check which Dietrich receives from Cary Grant is for $200 as I recall; in current dollars that would be something more like $2,500 and was an amount which would have set Depression-era audiences reeling with its clear implication of what Grant had received in return!

This is the first chance Cary Grant had to do a major co-starring role, and its the earliest of his films available on video. Another IMDb "comment" mentions Dietrich and Mae West supposedly "falling in love" with him, which is a laugh! Dietrich (in her daughter's bio) referred to him as the "shirt-seller" (Grant was selling men's shirts at the studio, as a sideline to make extra money); West preferred, to put it delicately, men who were a little more red meat (I think that Grant was already living with Randolph Scott at the time of filming; they used to attend Hollywood A-list parties as a couple, which Scott could get away with partially because of his very blue-blood East Coast family connections).

Originally available on LaserDisc (as a 2-disc set with "Shanghai Express").

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An awful woman. devtrev27
Marlene Dietrich's definitive screen role? ejgreen77
Marlene Dietrich + Cary Grant ejgreen77
Dietrich and Von Sternberg suspended by Paramount buyrgah
ONE OF MY FAVORITES OF ALL TIME pooosellp
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