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The Beast of the City (1932)

7.0
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Ratings: 7.0/10 from 617 users  
Reviews: 21 user | 9 critic

Police Chief Jim Fitzpatrick ruthlessly goes after organized crime and is prepared to use brutal and violent methods to fight it.

Director:

Writers:

(story), (dialogue continuity), 1 more credit »
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Title: The Beast of the City (1932)

The Beast of the City (1932) on IMDb 7/10

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
...
Wallace Ford ...
...
Dorothy Peterson ...
Tully Marshall ...
John Miljan ...
Emmett Corrigan ...
Warner Richmond ...
Tom
Sandy Roth ...
Mac
J. Carrol Naish ...
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Storyline

Police Chief Jim Fitzpatrick is fighting gangster Sam Belmonte. He asks his dishonest brother Ed to keep an eye on Daisy who was connected with Belmonte. Written by Ed Stephan <stephan@cc.wwu.edu>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Human lives are offered up daily to the Beast of the City Jungle, so that scented, silken-clad women can enjoy the forbidden thrills of a modern Babylon! See this heart-wrenching drama! See more »


Certificate:

TV-14 | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

13 February 1932 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

City Sentinels  »

Box Office

Budget:

$230,000 (estimated)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See  »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Fifty-two minutes into the film Daisy (Jean Harlow) has a party at her place. On a small table against the back wall is a photo of Clark Gable, her co-star in Red Dust (1932) the same year. See more »

Quotes

Daisy Stevens, aka Mildred Beaumont: [Seductively] I know, it;s a funny thing. You drink beer to make you cool, and it just makes yuh hot.
[She tugs on the cleavage of her dress]
Daisy Stevens, aka Mildred Beaumont: I can't stand it. I gotta do something about it.
[She walks away, ostensibly to take off her dress]
See more »

Connections

Featured in Harlow: The Blonde Bombshell (1993) See more »

Soundtracks

Wiegenlied, Op. 49, No. 4 (Brahms' Lullaby)
(1868) (uncredited)
Written by Johannes Brahms
Played as background music at the end
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User Reviews

 
Little known and waiting to be rediscovered
29 July 1999 | by (New York, New York) – See all my reviews

This is one of the grittiest of the pre-Production Code features. It is important to realize that just two years later, with the implementation of the rewritten Production Code in 1934, this film could not have been made.

As with any piece of popular entertainment that is nearly 70 years old, there are going to be dated elements. What is more important is how relatively modern this film feels, especially compared to the films made under the Production Code after 1934. The story is a hard slice of life, and it will not suit all tastes. This is especially true for those who have been too conditioned by Production Code features and television.

The ending has been compared to Sam Peckinpah's THE WILD BUNCH and Don Siegel's DIRTY HARRY, and not without cause. However, try to imagine yourself as a member of the original theatrical release audience in 1932. There would have been very little to prepare you for it, apart from DOORWAY TO HELL, LITTLE CAESAR, PUBLIC ENEMY, and SCARFACE. The difference here is that the story is told from the point of view of the men in law enforcement. It focuses on something that was common knowledge at the time, that prohibition had corrupted law enforcement far beyond the scope of anything the public had ever known.

The remedy for corruption that this film prescribes is very strong medicine indeed. You may not like it, but I defy you not to think about it for a long time after you've seen it.


17 of 19 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

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