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Too Many Cooks (1931)

Passed  -  Comedy | Romance  -  18 July 1931 (USA)
6.2
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Ratings: 6.2/10 from 38 users  
Reviews: 4 user | 1 critic

Two young lovers are building their house, but their relatives don't stop interfering, finally cutting off the young man's income and alienating them, but he is impressing everybody by ... See full summary »

Director:

(as William Seiter)

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(by), (screen play)
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Title: Too Many Cooks (1931)

Too Many Cooks (1931) on IMDb 6.2/10

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Bert Wheeler ...
Albert 'Al' Bennett
Dorothy Lee ...
Alice Cook
Roscoe Ates ...
Mr. Wilson (as Rosco Ates)
Robert McWade ...
Uncle George Bennett
...
Ella Mayer
Hallam Cooley ...
Frank Andrews
Florence Roberts ...
Mother Cook
Clifford Dempsey ...
Father Michael J. Cook
Ruth Weston ...
Minnie Spring
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Storyline

Two young lovers are building their house, but their relatives don't stop interfering, finally cutting off the young man's income and alienating them, but he is impressing everybody by continuing working at his home. Written by Stephan Eichenberg <eichenbe@fak-cbg.tu-muenchen.de>

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based on play | See All (1) »

Genres:

Comedy | Romance

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »
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Details

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Release Date:

18 July 1931 (USA)  »

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(RCA Photophone System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Bert Wheeler's only solo feature without his partner Robert Woolsey, until after Woolsey's 1938 death at age 49. See more »

Connections

Referenced in A Bronx Morning (1931) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Bert Wheeler and Dorothy Lee, without Robert Woolsey
22 October 2014 | by (Youngstown,Ohio) – See all my reviews

1931's "Too Many Cooks" was RKO's failed attempt to double their profits by splitting up their greatest asset, the comedy team of Bert Wheeler and Robert Woolsey, into separate features, Wheeler here, Woolsey following in "Everything's Rosie." Delightful Dorothy Lee, present in 14 of their 20 RKOs, was just as indispensable, happily retained for this dated property from actor/playwright Frank Craven, remembered by horror buffs as Dr. Harry Brewster opposite Lon Chaney in 1943's "Son of Dracula." Bert and Dorothy were unhappy during the filming, but their real-life affection for each other carries the picture through to the end, as an engaged couple building their dream home on a vacant lot in a rural area in upstate New York, 63 miles from NYC. He finally meets her extended family, all rather pushy and disapproving of him, while she reacts negatively to his wealthy uncle's plan to move in with them once the house is finished (Dorothy's best friend is played by Sharon Lynn, best remembered for Laurel and Hardy's "Way Out West," while Ruth Weston followed this with "The Public Defender," opposite Richard Dix and Boris Karloff). There's actually little else to the story, too close to reality to be amusing, Bert Wheeler's fairly straight rendition quite unlike anything else he did on screen, a role that was better suited for the domestic Hal Roach comic Charlie Chase. Dorothy Lee is as adorable as ever, and like Bert is called upon for a serious performance that makes one yearn for a little song and dance patter to lighten the unfunny mood. Always a good match, their wonderful on screen chemistry survives intact, but watching the hopeful lovebirds giving in to the demands of others is hardly surefire material for laughter; still, it may just be superior to Woolsey's "Everything's Rosie," which virtually by default is clearly the funnier of the two. After this, RKO dropped any further solo vehicles for Wheeler and Woolsey and teamed them for their 7th feature, "Caught Plastered," again with Dorothy Lee.


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