IMDb > The Public Enemy (1931)
The Public Enemy
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The Public Enemy (1931) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

User Rating:
7.8/10   10,707 votes »
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Director:
Writers:
Kubec Glasmon (by) and
John Bright (by) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for The Public Enemy on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
23 April 1931 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
A young hoodlum rises up through the ranks of the Chicago underworld, even as a gangster's accidental death threatens to spark a bloody mob war. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Nominated for Oscar. Another 1 win See more »
User Reviews:
A Thug's Life See more (97 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

James Cagney ... Tom Powers

Jean Harlow ... Gwen Allen
Edward Woods ... Matt Doyle

Joan Blondell ... Mamie
Donald Cook ... Mike Powers
Leslie Fenton ... Nails Nathan
Beryl Mercer ... Ma Powers
Robert Emmett O'Connor ... Paddy Ryan (as Robert O'Connor)
Murray Kinnell ... Putty Nose
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Clark Burroughs ... Dutch (uncredited)

Mae Clarke ... Kitty (uncredited)
Frank Coghlan Jr. ... Tom as a Boy (uncredited)
George Daly ... Machine Gunner (uncredited)

Frankie Darro ... Matt as a Boy (uncredited)
Snitz Edwards ... Miller (uncredited)
Rita Flynn ... Molly Doyle (uncredited)
Dorothy Gee ... Nails' Girl (uncredited)
Douglas Gerrard ... Assistant Tailor (uncredited)
Dorothy Gray ... Little Girl (uncredited)
Ben Hendricks Jr. ... 'Bugs' Moran as a Boy (uncredited)
Robert Homans ... Officer Pat Burke (uncredited)
Eddie Kane ... Joe - Headwaiter (uncredited)
Mia Marvin ... Jane (uncredited)
Sam McDaniel ... Headwaiter (uncredited)
Helen Parrish ... Little Girl (uncredited)
Lee Phelps ... Steve - Bartender (uncredited)
Russ Powell ... Bartender (uncredited)
Purnell Pratt ... Officer Powers (uncredited)
Nanci Price ... Little Girl (uncredited)
Landers Stevens ... Doctor (uncredited)
William H. Strauss ... Pawnbroker (uncredited)
Charles Sullivan ... Mug (uncredited)
Lucille Ward ... Larry Dalton's Weeping Mother (uncredited)
Adele Watson ... Mrs. Doyle (uncredited)
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Directed by
William A. Wellman 
 
Writing credits
Kubec Glasmon (by) and
John Bright (by)

Harvey F. Thew (screen adaptation) (as Harvey Thew)

Produced by
Darryl F. Zanuck .... producer (uncredited)
 
Cinematography by
Devereaux Jennings (photography) (as Dev Jennings)
 
Film Editing by
Edward M. McDermott (edited by) (as Edw. M. McDermott)
 
Casting by
Rufus Le Maire (uncredited)
 
Art Direction by
Max Parker 
 
Costume Design by
Edward Stevenson (uncredited)
 
Makeup Department
Perc Westmore .... makeup artist (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Dolph Zimmer .... assistant director (uncredited)
 
Stunts
Harvey Parry .... stunts (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Irving Glassberg .... assistant camera (uncredited)
Frank Kesson .... assistant camera (uncredited)
Nelson Laraby .... director of photography: additional photography (uncredited)
William Reinhold .... assistant camera (uncredited)
Al Roberts .... camera operator (uncredited)
William Schurr .... assistant camera (uncredited)
Harry L. Underwood .... assistant camera (uncredited)
Willard Van Enger .... camera operator (uncredited)
Sidney Wagner .... director of photography: second unit (uncredited)
Scotty Welbourne .... still photographer (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Earl Luick .... wardrobe
 
Music Department
David Mendoza .... conductor: Vitaphone Orchestra
David Mendoza .... composer: title music (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Dillingham .... production assistant (uncredited)
William Guthrie .... location manager (uncredited)
Newitt .... production assistant (uncredited)
Clem Peoples .... technical advisor (uncredited)
Rule .... production assistant (uncredited)
Whitmore .... production assistant (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


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Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
83 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Brunswick Radios Used Exclusively)
Certification:
Argentina:13 | Australia:PG | Brazil:14 | Canada:PG (video rating) | Finland:K-15 (2005) | Germany:12 | New Zealand:PG | Sweden:(Banned) | Sweden:15 (re-rating) (1977) | UK:A (cinema release) | UK:PG (video release)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Several versions exist of the origin of the notorious grapefruit scene, but the most plausible is the one on which both James Cagney and Mae Clarke agree: The scene, they explained, was actually staged as a practical joke at the expense of the film crew, just to see their stunned reactions. There was never any intention of ever using the shot in the completed film. Director William A. Wellman, however, eventually decided to keep the shot, and use it in the film's final release print.See more »
Goofs:
Factual errors: In a 1917 scene, Molly says that Mike Powers enlisted in the Marines. However, in a 1920 scene, Mike is wearing on his uniform the shoulder patch of the Second Infantry Division, which is part of the Army.See more »
Quotes:
Tom Powers:[Tom shuffles to the breakfast table in his pajamas. He's just finished a demanding call with Nails Nathan] Ain't you got a drink in the house?
Kitty:Well, not before breakfast, dear.
Tom Powers:[immediately annoyed] ... I didn't ask you for any lip. I asked you if you had a drink.
Kitty:[sheepishly] I know Tom, but I, I wish that...
Tom Powers:...there you go with that wishin' stuff again. I wish you was a wishing well. So that I could tie a bucket to ya and sink ya.
Kitty:Well, maybe you've found someone you like better.
[Tom is enraged and disgusted by her implication. He grimaces and shoves a grapefruit in her face as he leaves the table]
See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
I Surrender DearSee more »

FAQ

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60 out of 80 people found the following review useful.
A Thug's Life, 1 May 2004
Author: lugonian from Kissimmee, Florida

THE PUBLIC ENEMY (Warner Brothers, 1931), directed by William A. Wellman, is a prime example of how a motion picture produced in the early sound era can still hold up today. A worthy follow-up to the studio's most recent gangster outing, LITTLE CAESAR (1930), that elevated Edward G. Robinson to stardom, THE PUBLIC ENEMY brought forth another new screen personality, James Cagney, displaying a different kind of movie thug: rough, with guys who betray him; tough, with women who get on his nerves or play him for a sucker; and ready, to succeed by socking, punching, slapping or killing anybody who gets in his way. His only soft spot for his mother, but far from being a "Momma's Boy."

Through its passage in time element starting in 1909 Chicago, THE PUBLIC ENEMY plays in the biographical mode, displaying the origins of its main characters, Tom Powers and Matt Doyle, as boys (Junior Coughlan and Frankie Darro), leading to their adult lives (James Cagney and Edward Woods) as tough thugs. Tom Powers character, regardless of his fine upbringing, indicates he was born ... to be bad. He has a brother, Mike (Donald Cook) who knows of his activities, while their mother (Beryl Mercer) may suspect but overlooks his actions. As things start going well for Tom and Matt in the bootlegging racket under Paddy Ryan's (Robert Emmett O'Connor) leadership, Scheiner Burns, a rival gang leader, attempts on taking over Ryan's establishment, leading to more gun-play, especially for Tom, quick on the trigger, only to have things backfire on him.

If not the most famous of the early gangster films, THE PUBLIC ENEMY is one of the most revived. Quite frank in its actions, and adult for its intentions, much of the then so- called violence occurs out of camera range. Yet, whatever is displayed on film is something not to forget. These days, there isn't a year that goes where THE PUBLIC ENEMY isn't televised. Whenever a topic pertaining to THE PUBLIC ENEMY arises, it's not the story that immediately comes to mind, but Cagney's individual scenes consisting of squirting beer from his mouth into the bartender's face; Tom's cold-blooded killing of Putty Nose (the man who let him take the rap for a crime) while playing his last song on the piano; and Tom's off-screen shootout with a rival gang in a fancy nightclub, stumbling out in the pouring rain saying to himself, "I ain't so tough." All these scenes pale in comparison until reaching its most chilling climax ever recorded on film. Yet, the one where Tom, at the breakfast table, pushes a grapefruit into his mistress Kitty's (Mae Clarke) face, never has such a brief scene have such an long impact. Other than Clarke's famous few minutes of grapefruit glory, Mia Marvin (whose face resembling Maureen "Marcia Brady" McCormick from TV's 1970s sit-com, "The Brady Bunch") playing a slut named Jane, is one who gets her face slapped after getting Tom drunk enough to seduce him. The second billed Jean Harlow doesn't get any abuse from her leading man as did the other two actresses receiving no screen credit for their trouble. While Harlow's performance has been criticized as one of her worst, chances are her portrayal might have been intended to be enacted in that manner. Harlow's Gwen Allen is an uneducated blonde floozy with her gift for attracting men. What possibly hurts the film is not Harlow herself, but the inane dialog she recites, ("Oh Tommy, I can love you to death!". Joan Blondell's limitations on screen is mostly one involving her relation with Tom's pal, Matt. Edward Woods, whose has almost equal screen time with Cagney, is a Hollywood name very few recollect today. Several documentaries profiling gangster films have indicated Woods as the initial star of THE PUBLIC ENEMY with Cagney assuming the subordinate role, with director Wellman seeing an error with the casting and wisely having these actors switch roles. While a smart move on Wellman's part, he failed to switch roles on the boy actors who portrayed them, especially a keen observer noticing Frankie Darro playing Matt, not Junior Coughlan playing Tom, performing in the Cagney manner. Donald Cook, Beryl Mercer and Robert O'Connor appearing in subordinate roles, are essential with their parts, but never outshine Hollywood's finest movie thug, a/k/a Public Enemy, James Cagney, whose tougher roles, ANGELS WITH DIRTY FACES (1938) and WHITE HEAT (1949) were years into his future. With limited underscoring, the theme song, "I'm Forever Blowing Bubbles," like Cagney and his grapefruit, has long become associated with THE PUBLIC ENEMY.

THE PUBLIC ENEMY, which has become one of the first major movies from the Warner Brothers library to be distributed on video cassette (consisting mostly of prints from slightly edited reissues), and later on DVD (with either edited or restored prints), can be seen quite frequently on Turner Classic Movies. It might not have the realistic violence as any crime film of today, but THE PUBLIC ENEMY presents itself as a gangster drama that doesn't have to be all blood and guts to become successful. Good acting, fine story, interesting characters supplied with tight action is all what is needed to make a good movie. Being a natural talent, Cagney makes THE PUBLIC ENEMY all it's worth. (***)

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So they whacked the horse then? FilmKoala
what if this movie was remade? infamousdave886
Clockwork Orange steals a scene! KubricksSeal
Finally! I got that Bugs Bunny Reference andrewsk8s
What was the last thing James Cagney Said?? mikehunt620
No dvd of this one? feilertsen
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