MOVIEmeter
SEE RANK
Down 80,130 this week

Der Mörder Dimitri Karamasoff (1931)

7.5
Your rating:
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 -/10 X  
Ratings: 7.5/10 from 95 users  
Reviews: 3 user | 1 critic

Suspicion surrounds a lieutenant for killing his father.

Directors:

, (as Fjodor Ozep)
0Check in
0Share...

User Lists

Related lists from IMDb users

a list of 35 titles
created 10 Mar 2013
 
a list of 1600 titles
created 08 Apr 2013
 
list image
a list of 155 titles
created 10 months ago
 
list image
a list of 514 titles
created 6 months ago
 
a list of 40 titles
created 2 months ago
 

Related Items

Connect with IMDb


Share this Rating

Title: Der Mörder Dimitri Karamasoff (1931)

Der Mörder Dimitri Karamasoff (1931) on IMDb 7.5/10

Want to share IMDb's rating on your own site? Use the HTML below.

Take The Quiz!

Test your knowledge of Der Mörder Dimitri Karamasoff.
Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Danton (1931)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.7/10 X  
Director: Hans Behrendt
Stars: Fritz Kortner, Lucie Mannheim, Gustaf Gründgens
The Brothers Karamazov (TV Mini-Series 2013)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.3/10 X  

Set in present day Japan in a provincial town, Bunzo Kurosawa, a greedy and violent father, is murdered in his own home. Bunzo has 3 sons: oldest son Mitsuru (Takumi Saito), second son Isao... See full summary »

Stars: Tsubasa Yadome, Hayato Ichihara, Takumi Saitô
Tulsa (1949)
Certificate: Passed Action | Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.3/10 X  

It's Tulsa, Oklahoma at the start of the oil boom and Cherokee Lansing's rancher father is killed in a fight with the Tanner Oil Company. Cherokee plans revenge by bringing in her own wells... See full summary »

Director: Stuart Heisler
Stars: Susan Hayward, Robert Preston, Pedro Armendáriz
Cop (1988)
Crime | Drama | Mystery
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.4/10 X  

An obsessive, insubordinate homicide cop is convinced a serial killer is loose in the Hollywood area and disobeys orders in order to catch him.

Director: James B. Harris
Stars: James Woods, Lesley Ann Warren, Charles Durning
J'accuse! (1919)
Drama | Horror | War
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7/10 X  

The story of two men, one married, the other the lover of the other's wife, who meet in the trenches of the First World War, and how their tale becomes a microcosm for the horrors of war.

Director: Abel Gance
Stars: Romuald Joubé, Séverin-Mars, Maryse Dauvray
Hell on Earth (1931)
Drama | War
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.9/10 X  
Directors: Victor Trivas, George Shdanoff
Stars: Ernst Busch, Vladimir Sokoloff, Renée Stobrawa
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 -/10 X  
Director: Fyodor Otsep
Stars: Fritz Kortner, Anna Sten, Hanna Waag
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.7/10 X  
Director: Petr Zelenka
Stars: Michaela Badinková, Jerzy Michal Bozyk, Igor Chmela
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 -/10 X  
Director: Giacomo Gentilomo
Stars: Fosco Giachetti, Lamberto Picasso, Mariella Lotti
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.6/10 X  

Three brothers, one spiritual and living at a monastary, one a gambler, and one an intellectual, work out their problems in 19th century Russia.

Directors: Kirill Lavrov, Ivan Pyryev, and 1 more credit »
Stars: Mikhail Ulyanov, Lionella Pyryeva, Kirill Lavrov
Edit

Cast

Cast overview:
Fritz Kortner ...
...
Fritz Rasp ...
Bernhard Minetti ...
Max Pohl ...
Fedor Karamasoff
Hanna Waag ...
Fritz Alberti ...
Gerichtspräsident
Werner Hollmann ...
Der Pole
Elisabeth Neumann-Viertel ...
Fenja (as Liese Neumann)
Laurie Lane ...
(as Lore Mosheim)
Edit

Storyline

Suspicion surrounds a lieutenant for killing his father.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

24 November 1931 (Japan)  »

Also Known As:

Karamazov  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.20 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Connections

Alternate-language version of Les frères Karamazoff (1931) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
`A forgotten masterpiece'
11 January 2001 | by ((Sheffield, England)) – See all my reviews

Even by today's standards, this is still a film masterpiece, but, when one considers when it was made it is even more stunning, for it is so innovative and original that it is a tragedy that it is not more widely known. Seeing it with contemporary eyes and ears, it is easy to forget that sound film was then still new and in its infancy, and yet Otsep and Karol Rathaus (given his first opportunity to compose for a film), immediately grasped the fundamental potential music could play in propelling dramatic narrative. To his eternal credit, the late, great Bernard Herrmann in a published interview, cited this film as the one he most admired for its creative use of a musical score.

The frantic coach ride, when Karamazov pursues Grushenka when she has abandoned him, must rank, even today, as one of the most dynamic scenes in world cinema. With its rapid cross cutting and editing, allied with Rathaus' incredible score, which uses frantic drumming, Chinese blocks and assorted percussion instruments, it perfectly conveys the desperation and mad love we are confronted with, and, although probably only lasting less than a minute in screen time, leaves one stunned and breathless with excitement.

Then, when Karamazov arrives at the bordello to which Grushenka has fled, can you believe, in a film shot in 1930, (when sound cameras weighed a ton), Otsep introduces an uninterrupted tracking shot, as Karmazov wanders from room to room, trailed and proceeded by the camera in real time, as he seeks to find her, which is every bit as dynamic and fascinating as the opening shot of `A Touch of Evil'?

I am convinced that Orson Welles had already seen this film before setting out to make `Citizen Kane', since so many of the innovations in that for which he was hailed, actually first appeared in Otsep's film. It is a perfect marriage of silent film montage and editing, with all the new potential that sound unleashed fully realised, and Otsep combines the two with incredible skill and mastery.

Full of atmosphere and a Slavonic expressionistic fatalism, it is in many ways much more of a `Russian' film than a German one, (it is interesting to note that a French speaking version was simultaneously filmed alongside this). Although there is a slight narrative blurring and overlap between Dostoyevsky's `Karamazov' and Tolstoy's `Resurrection', (both often filmed in any case), this does at least provide the ending of the film with a slight modicum of hope.

Set within baroque interiors which hardly ever leave any surface uncovered, unpatterned, or not seducing the eye to gain its attention, and contrasted with bleak and hostile exteriors, the inner and outer worlds of human experience are constantly juxtaposed and shown to be in perpetual conflict. If only modern film-makers would study and learn from the sheer economy of space and time used in pre-50s cinema!

As befits writers of the calibre of Dostoyevsky, (and, perhaps even more so, the borrowing from Tolstoy), a wild anarchic spirit animates the characters as they act out their fatalistic drama, (the amour fou that Otsep was later to explore in `Amok'), but, all through, and in part heightened by Rathaus' music, there is a fearful melancholy that pervades it all; a sense of impending doom. These are what we would today call dysfunctional characters, but they are imprisoned in the manners and mores of their time; trying to claw some small space in which they can be free, but in their innermost heart of hearts knowing that it is unlikely to be.

When Grushenka decides to join Karamazov in his exile in Siberia, the train which takes them away, (that constant and valuable cinematic metaphor of inevitability and mechanistic fatalism, and with hindsight, so similar to the transportations used by the Nazis ten years later), is seen vanishing into oblivion, with the camera astride the track, against which backdrop Rathaus added a musical chord sequence that borders on heartbreak, poignancy and pain.

A masterpiece of world cinema that must one day be rediscovered and given its rightful respect and critical admiration.

(A sinister footnote should perhaps mention that out-of-context sequences from this film were strung together as part of the Nazi anti-Semitic film `Der Ewige Jude', (together with scenes similarly lifted from Fritz Lang's `M'), to illustrate what were termed `degenerate Jewish influences in German cinema'. It is fortunate that Otsep and his wife were able to leave Paris where they were then living, just days before the Germans arrived during WW2, since they immediately closed all cinemas and then, after a week or so, allowed a few to re-open which were forced to show `Der Ewige Jude'. Unfortunately, Otsep's career was never able to recover and find the opportunities through which to re-establish himself as a master film craftsman in the USA, and he died in 1949).


24 of 25 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Recent Posts
Is this on DVD anywhere? haciendacaliente
I am looking for this film. nickvp
Discuss Der Mörder Dimitri Karamasoff (1931) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?