Rudy Vallee and His Connecticut Yankees, as judge and jury, try three musical misdemeanors; the last defendant is a live-action Betty Boop, who sings a duet with Rudy.

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(story), (story) (as Samuel Timberg)
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Storyline

Rudy Vallee and His Connecticut Yankees, as judge and jury, try three musical misdemeanors; the last defendant is a live-action Betty Boop, who sings a duet with Rudy. Written by Rod Crawford <puffinus@u.washington.edu>

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Musical | Short

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26 December 1931 (USA)  »

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(Western Electric Noiseless System)

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1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

One of only two films to feature a live-action Betty Boop, the other being Hollywood on Parade No. A-8 (1933). See more »

Connections

Featured in Biography: Betty Boop See more »

Soundtracks

I'm on the Jury Now
(uncredited)
Music by Sammy Timberg
Lyrics by Samuel Lerner (as Sammy Lerner)
Performed by Rudy Vallee and His Connecticut Yankees
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User Reviews

 
The People Vs. Betty Boop
23 October 2009 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

This musical short may "star" Rudy Vallee, one of the most popular "crooners" of the era but it's main interest for many will be the chance to see actress Mae Questel, who did the voice of Betty Boop in most of the classic cartoon shorts, play Betty as a flesh-and-blood character. This ten-minute film has Vallee as the judge of "Musical Court" where he hears cases put before him. It's pretty much a trial itself for the audience to have to sit through the first two cases, number one being a feud between a black preacher and choir member that smacks of stereotypes, the second a lame divorce suit that is thrown out with a corny love song sung by Vallee. Finally bringing some much needed entertainment - and boop - into the proceedings is Ms. Betty Boop who is threatened with having her boop-boop-a-doop taken away due to her "assaults" against music. The irony of the film is that Mae Questel's number is by far the most delightful bit in the film and she has a music sensibility far more appealing to latter day audiences than erstwhile superstar Vallee.

I couldn't imagine liking this film without the Mae Questel segment and she alone is the reason for my rating of seven. It's a real treat to see the young Ms. Questel who in her old age became a fairly familiar character actress with appearances in Barbra Streisand and Woody Allen films and her long stint as "Aunt Bluebell" in television commercials for Scott Towels in the 1970's.


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