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The Last Flight (1931)

 -  Drama  -  29 August 1931 (USA)
7.9
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Ratings: 7.9/10 from 1,068 users  
Reviews: 22 user | 5 critic

Cary, Shep, Bill, and Francis are pilots during World War I. Cary and Shep's plane is shot down, and they barely survive; they're released from the hospital on Armistice Day... See full synopsis »

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(novel), (screenplay), 1 more credit »
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Title: The Last Flight (1931)

The Last Flight (1931) on IMDb 7.9/10

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
Cary Lockwood
David Manners ...
Shep Lambert
...
Bill Talbot (as John Mack Brown)
Helen Chandler ...
Nikki
Elliott Nugent ...
Francis (as Elliot Nugent)
Walter Byron ...
Frink
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Storyline

Cary, Shep, Bill, and Francis are pilots during World War I. Cary and Shep's plane is shot down, and they barely survive; they're released from the hospital on Armistice Day... See full synopsis »

Add Full Plot | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

Not Rated
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Details

Country:

Language:

|

Release Date:

29 August 1931 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The Last Flight  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See  »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

In September 1928, Warner Bros. Pictures purchased a majority interest in First National Pictures and from that point on, all "First National" productions were actually made under Warner Bros. control, even though the two companies continued to retain separate identities until the mid-1930's, after which time "A Warner Bros.-First National Picture" was often used. See more »

Goofs

During the sequence in the bullfight ring in Lisbon, the footage of the actual bullfight is stock filmed during the silent era at the then-standard speed of 16 frames per second. Spliced into a sound film and projected at the sound-standard 24 frames per second, it looks unnaturally fast. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Only Angels Have Wings (1939) See more »

Soundtracks

La valse brune
Written by Georges Krier and Georges Villard (1909)
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User Reviews

 
Early Talkie from the Warner Archive,
16 July 2012 | by (Salisbury, United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

My DVD is a region 2, but I cannot now recall where I bought it from. This is the nearest listing that Amazon run, so...

End of the Great War, Paris - four young U.S. pilots are discharged from hospital, for fairly minor ailments, but they will never will fly again. Thousands of miles from home and all sense of responsibilities abandoned, they just yearn to get 'tight'. Hitting the bright lights and seeking the gaiety takes away the memories and the pain. Whilst out, they encounter the free-spirited Nikki.

She lives off her wealthy mother and so, soon, we are treated to the antics of the young at the time and for the most part, it's light, frothy and often funny nonsense. When I read that it was about wounded servicemen being repatriated, I was sort of expecting a 'The Best Years Of Our Lives' but for the First War. There is very little similarity and you could think, for the worse. The band of new friends then travel by train to Lisbon - and continue as before, until tragedy strikes.

Apparently, this "lost generation" of American expatriates who found themselves in Paris or Madrid in the 1920s, were characters beloved by authors F Scott Fitzgerald (who coined the phrase) and Ernest Hemingway.

To my eyes, it works best as a snapshot of a time and a certain place and for its spritely humour. I'm sure 1930's Depression-hit Hollywood wasn't the place for a serious and possibly maudlin look at War. If ever there was a film that carried the expression "What's the idea?" to the point of repetition, it's this one.


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