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Drácula (1931) Poster

(1931)

Trivia

For decades, the only surviving print, while in mint condition, was missing several minutes worth of material that encompassed Renfield's seduction by Dracula's brides and the voyage to England. The "lost" reel was eventually located in Cuba, and has been restored to complete the film as much as possible. Though much more worn and aged than the rest of the film, the additional footage differs strikingly from the English-language version of Dracula (1931), probably more so than any other part of the film.
This Spanish-language version runs nearly a half-hour longer than the English-language version of Dracula (1931) that was being shot during the day.
Director George Melford did not speak or understand Spanish.
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Although this version was shot in Spanish, it became a mixture of dialects since the cast came from Mexico, Spain, Central and South America.
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This Spanish-language version was filmed on the same sets and at the same time as the English-language, Bela Lugosi version of Dracula (1931). The English-language version was filmed during the day, and the Spanish-language version was filmed at night.
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Hunchbacked dwarf John George is the only actor with speaking parts in both the English and Spanish versions. When Van Helsing is explaining about vampires to a group clustered around a desk, George says, "nosferatu". He is on the extreme right in the Spanish version, on the left in the English version.
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When this film was released on DVD in 2004 as part of the "Dracula: Legacy Collection", it included closed captions for the hearing impaired, but did not contain the straight English subtitles. Universal answered buyers' complaints by telling them to simply select the "closed captions".
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Although the Lugosi version is silent except for credits, this version uses the first few notes of Schubert's Unfinished Symphony each time Dracula rises from his coffin.
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See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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