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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2007

16 items from 2016


Forbidden Hollywood Volume 10

25 June 2016 7:43 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Woo hoo! The pre-Code marvels return for one last go-round -- tales of sin and moral turpitude but also serious pictures about social issues that the Production Code effectively swept from Hollywood screens -- financial crimes and ethnic bigotry. Forbidden Hollywood Volume 10 Guilty Hands, The Mouthpiece, Secrets of the French Police, The Match King, Ever in My Heart DVD-r The Warner Archive Collection 1932-1934 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 63, 62, 78, 85, 70 min. / Street Date October 27, 2015 / available through the WBshop / 40.99 Starring Lionel Barrymore, Kay Francis, Madge Evans; Warren William, Sidney Fox, Aline McMahon; Frank Morgan, Gwili Andre, Gregory Ratoff Rochelle Hudson; Warren William, Lili Damita, Glenda Farrell, Claire Dodd; Barbara Stanwyck, Otto Kruger, Ralph Bellamy, Ruth Donnelly. Cinematography Merritt B. Gerstad, Barney McGill; Alfred Gilks; Robert Kurrie; Written by Bayard Veiller; Joseph Jackson, Earl Baldwin, Frank J. Collins; Samuel Ornitz, Robert Tasker; Houston Branch, Sidney Sutherland, Einar Thorvaldson; Bertram Millhauser, Beulah Marie Dix. »

- Glenn Erickson

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Review: The New York Philharmonic's Tribute To Charlie Chaplin's "City Lights" (1931)

21 May 2016 12:01 PM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

By Lee Pfeiffer

One of the great joys any retro movie lover can experience is to view a screening of a classic film with a world-class orchestra playing the musical score as live accompaniment. Many acclaimed orchestras are now doing just that and delighting movie lovers across the globe. Among the most impressive performances, not surprisingly,  are those presented by the New York Philharmonic, which has a very popular film-related series that is as diversified as it is irresistible. On May 19, the the Nyp presented a superb tribute to Charlie Chaplin with a screening of his 1931 masterpiece, "City Lights". Conductor Timothy Brock informed that audience that by 1931 silent film was already dead. The new era of sound was all the rage but Chaplin's clout and popularity were such that he could still find financing for his films despite his insistence that they would be shot and presented as silent movies. »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Book Review: “TCM Presents The Essentials—52 Must-see Movies And Why They Matter” (2016; by Jeremy Arnold; Foreword by Robert Osborne) (Running Press)

16 May 2016 3:10 AM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

The Essentials”—A Good Starting Point

By Raymond Benson

Any book that claims to be a collection of the “best” of something—whether it is a listing of movies, music, art, and so forth—has to be taken with a grain of salt. These kinds of things are entirely subjective; although in this case, TCM (Turner Classic Movies) does have a kind of clout and expertise in the matter.

That said, we have this beautifully-designed and illustrated coffee-table trade paperback that contains not 1000, not 100, not 50... but 52 “essential must-see movies.” TCM’s spokesperson, Robert Osborne, explains the criteria in his Foreword—“The Essentials” is a weekly Saturday night event on the television network in which a guest host (the likes of Rob Reiner, Sydney Pollack, Peter Bogdanovich, Drew Barrymore, and more) introduce a picture he or she believes is an Essential. The book is a collection of some of these Essentials, »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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New York Philharmonic Upcoming Film-related Concerts

7 May 2016 3:17 AM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

The New York Philharmonic has an exciting schedule of events relating to classic film.

On May 19 there will be a live orchestra accompaniment to Charlie Chaplin's silent film classic "City Lights". (Click here for details).  On May 20-21, there will be a live orchestra accompaniment to Walt Disney's "Fantasia". (Click here for details). On May 24, there will be a major concert celebrating the film scores of John Williams. (Click here for details). 

 

»

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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NYC Weekend Watch: Polanski, Akerman, Ozu, Prince & More

28 April 2016 5:23 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Since any New York cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Metrograph

“Fassbinder’s Top 10” offers Salò on Friday, Walsh‘s The Naked and the Dead & Visconti‘s The Damned on Saturday, and Gentlemen Prefer Blondes on Sunday. All are on 35mm.

Roman Polanski‘s Frantic shows this Sunday, as does Ashes and Embers.

Spirited Away and The Cat Returns play as part of “Studio Ghibli Weekends. »

- Nick Newman

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The Top 25 Funniest Actors of All Time

16 April 2016 7:33 PM, PDT | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

 Who are the funniest, wackiest, cleverest, wittiest comic actors in the history of film and television? Take a look at our list and see who we came up with.

 

The top 25 laugh-getters…

 

 #25…George Carlin: Probably the best stand-up comedian of all-time. He brilliantly satirized American culture, mixing his liberal social commentary with an often unapologetically coarse and dirty style of language. His penchant for obscenities was most evident in his trademark routine “Seven words you can never say on television”. No one was better at mocking the excesses of American culture than Carlin.

 #24…Robin Williams: He had a manic energy and great improvisational skills. His hyper, free-form style inspired many comedians to follow, such as Jim Carrey. He shot to fame in the TV series Mork & Mindy, before breaking away to very successful movie career, appearing in films like Good Morning Vietnam, The World According to Garp, Mrs. Doubtfire and Popeye. »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Rob Young)

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Rita Gam obituary

29 March 2016 7:06 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Versatile actor with notable roles in films such as The Thief and Klute

The actor Rita Gam, who has died aged 87, starred in many films from the 1950s onwards, alongside famous names including Gregory Peck and Jane Fonda. When just 24, with modest stage and television experience, she was cast opposite another leading figure, Ray Milland, for her Hollywood debut in what the publicity described as “the only motion picture of its kind”.

This was The Thief (1952), a cold war spy film devised by the writer-director Russell Rouse in the style of Charlie Chaplin’s City Lights (1931) as a sound film entirely without dialogue. Indeed, Rouse went one better in having no intertitles, the cards using written words to set the scene or supply the dialogue.

Continue reading »

- Brian Baxter

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Rita Gam obituary

29 March 2016 7:06 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Versatile actor with notable roles in films such as The Thief and Klute

The actor Rita Gam, who has died aged 87, starred in many films from the 1950s onwards, alongside famous names including Gregory Peck and Jane Fonda. When just 24, with modest stage and television experience, she was cast opposite another leading figure, Ray Milland, for her Hollywood debut in what the publicity described as “the only motion picture of its kind”.

This was The Thief (1952), a cold war spy film devised by the writer-director Russell Rouse in the style of Charlie Chaplin’s City Lights (1931) as a sound film entirely without dialogue. Indeed, Rouse went one better in having no intertitles, the cards using written words to set the scene or supply the dialogue.

Continue reading »

- Brian Baxter

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Top 10 Oscar Surprises

24 February 2016 11:21 AM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Here are 10 Oscar moments that left us gobsmacked. Which winners, speeches, performances, fashions, and gaffes surprised you the most? Let us know in the comments below. 10. Charlie Chaplin Receives 12-Minute Standing Ovation (1972) It may not be surprising, exactly — after all, he earned it with "The Gold Rush," "City Lights," "Modern Times," and "The Great Dictator," among others — but the sheer length of the ovation Chaplin upon receiving an honorary Oscar in 1972 left the filmmaker himself nearly speechless. (Though he'd received a special award for "The Circus" in 1929, his remarkable career had, to that point, netted but three competitive nominations — two for "The Great Dictator" and one for "Monsieur Verdoux" — and no wins.) As perhaps the greatest of the silent cinema's actors and directors understood, there are times when "words seem so futile, so feeble," and this was surely one. 9. Roberto »

- Matt Brennan

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Oscar-Nominee 'Bear Story' Dir. Gabriel Osorio on His Grandfather's Exile & Latin American Animation

22 February 2016 4:57 PM, PST | Sydney's Buzz | See recent Sydney's Buzz news »

With two Academy Award nominations this year and the increased overall quality of productions made in the region, Latin American animation is rapidly evolving from a technique sporadically employed in those territories to a viable alternative medium for artists to explore both local and universal stories.

“Bear Story” (“Historia de un oso”) by Chilean animator Gabriel Osorio - currently nominated in the Best Animated Short category next to works by three previously nominated filmmakers and a Pixar production - tackles one of the darkest chapter’s in his country’s history through a personal CG animated narrative about a bear who copes with loss by sharing his story using an intricate diorama with handcrafted metal figurines.   

Touching and delicately textured, the story, inspired by Osorio’s grandfather’s experiences, is sophistically written to be satisfying on an emotional level and carry its historical undertones subtly. Osorio talked to us about the memories that marked his childhood making animation in Chile, and storytellers’ responsibility to give us hope.

Carlos Aguilar: I know that your grandfather inspired “Bear Story." Tell me about his story and how did it become the basis for this animated short?

Gabriel Osorio: Mi grandfather was imprisoned after the coup d’état of 1973, during Pinochet’s dictatorship, and was then exiled to England simply because he was a public official during the socialist government. When I was born my grandfather was still living in exile and I grew up with this image of a grandfather that for some reason was forbidden from returning to the country and be with his family.  That marked a great part of my childhood and that somehow pushed me tell the story of this character that is forcibly separated from his family and how terrible it is to return after many years in exile and realize that nothing is like it used to be.

CA: Though the short film works perfectly for a young audience, adults will understand the political and historical nuances that are also part of the story. Why was it important for you to have these two readings within the film?

Gabriel Osorio: From the very beginning I thought of making a story that could be seen by anyone, children or adults, for that reason it was important not to be literal or focus only on the historical or political aspects, but instead create a story that could speak about feelings and emotions with which any person can identify. In that sense, it was very important for me to have these distinct levels of interpretation, because they creates the possibility for new interpretations to be generated based on the experiences of each audience member. That’s always been the type of cinema that I want to make, which creates a dialogue with the audience and leaves spaces open for interpretation.

CA: How did the idea of using a bear and his story of being separated from his family and locked away in a circus as a metaphor to talk about your country’s dark past come about?

Gabriel Osorio: I met my grandfather when I was 10-years-old and what caught my attention the most was seeing how tall and big he was. He was like a bear. I believe that the use of this particular animal comes from that and the metaphor comes from trying to find an analogy between what he lived and what our family suffered living so many years away from him. For our team it was very important to convey a message about family and the importance of families remaining together.

CA: Tell me about the two visual styles that are you used in “Bear Story.” The present has a very particular elegant design, while the metal world of the music box seems even more meticulously crafted.

Gabriel Osorio: Both visual styles were a challenge in terms of the technical aspects because it in fact required us to make two different short films. In terms of the design and the art of the film, which was done by Antonia Herrera, it was important to show the details in the world of the metallic figures. I believe that the textures and the worn out details, contribute to creating the idea that there is a story behind the objects. They support the idea of this nostalgia and the idea that things were different in the past. It was also important to reflect the hard work and affection that the bear puts into the making of those figures because for him they represent his family, his memories. This also relates to the work we did as animators.

CA: The bear in the film is a storyteller himself and used the music box to share his story. Why did you feel this was the right

storytelling device for the film?

Gabriel Osorio: Besides my grandfather’s story, the idea of a bear as a storyteller has to do with a metaphor about our work as animators and filmmakers. Despite the fact that the bear knows his life is not like he would like it to be, he still tries to pass along  a positive message of hope. I think that we as animators have the responsibility of giving hope to the new generations, to understand that injustices exist and will always exist in the world, but we can always do our part so these stories don’t happen again.

CA: “Bear Story” is entirely a visual short. Why did you decide dialogue was unnecessary for the story you were trying to tell?

Gabriel Osorio: It was a decision based mostly on my personal preferences and the nostalgia for a type of cinema that is rare these days. One of my favorite films is “City Lights” by Chaplin, and I personally believe that if you can express yourself simply with images, those ideas will stay with the viewer. It also has to do with my training in Fine Arts. I specialized in oil paintings and the use of images. 

CA; “Bear Story” has connected with audiences from different nationalities and ages, even though perhaps some of them might not know of the historical context. What do you think makes it a universal tale?

Gabriel Osorio: The film has screened in many festivals around the world and it has won awards in Taiwan, Australia, the U.S., Greece, the Netherlands, etc. It’s definitely a universal story, which was always our objective. I think this is due to the fact that it’s a very human tale, very sad and nostalgic, that captivates audiences and generates empathy for the character. After every screening people always ask the same thing, “What happened to the bear’s family?” People are intrigued after watching it.

Some people in Europe have associated the short with the Russian revolution and people in Taiwan with the Japanese invasion,  so even though this happened in Chile, exile is something that has happened everywhere in the world and that’s why many people see themselves reflected in the film

CA: How hard is it to make animation in Chile in terms of financing and resources?

Gabriel Osorio: Within the region, Chile stands out in terms of programs and initiatives that support the making of audiovisual works, both in film and television. In recent years these programs have opened specific opportunities for animation, which has increased the production of animated works.  What’s complicated is that the resources granted by these funds are still too low for the entire production of an animated feature and one can only submit a project for consideration once a year, which means that productions that don’t get these resources are stalled.

CA: Would you say Latin American animation is going through a period of growth and greater international exposure? If so, why do you think that is?

Gabriel Osorio: Without a doubt, Latin American animation is going trough a great moment, and proof of this is that “Bear Story” is nominated for Best Animated Short and “Boy and the World” for Best Animated Feature. Added to this, animated features and animated television series are being produced in the majority of the region’s countries, which stimulates the possibilities for co-productions and opens the window for the exhibition of Latin American animated cinema in Latin America and the world.

I believe this growth is due to the specialization of professionals working in animation and an interest for the content being produced to cross borders. Projects are being developed thinking in the global market, which allows them to reach more territories and screens.

CA: What was your reaction when you found out about the Oscar nomination?

Gabriel Osorio: It was a total surprise. Although we were hopeful since we got on the shortlist, it was still a dream that seemed far away and is now a reality.  Two years ago I would have never imagined we would be in this position. The best part is that the nomination is not only positive for Punkrobot as an independent animation studio, but it’s also a tremendous accomplishment for Chile and Latin American animation I general.

CA: Do you plan to make an animated feature in the near future?

Gabriel Osorio: Yes we have a couple ideas on file and we are eager to make an animated feature. We feel that having made two animated series with 40 episodes in total, besides the short film, has given us the necessary experience to achieve it. We want to continue making stories that connect on an emotional level with the audience through messages and themes that are simple and universal.

You can watch "Bear Story" as part of Shorts HD's theatrical release of the 2016 Oscar Nominated Short Films - Animation playing in cities around the country now.

»

- Carlos Aguilar

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Charlie Chaplin Theme Park Aims for April Opening After Decade of Delays

17 February 2016 2:00 PM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Following years of delay, the Manoir de Ban, the Swiss home where Charlie Chaplin spent the last 25 years of his life, will finally open to the public in April, developers announced Monday, according to reports.Following extensive rebuilding and renovations, the stately home will act as the centerpiece of Chaplin's World, a theme park dedicated to "The Little Tramp." Set on an 18-acre property overlooking Lake Geneva in Corsier-sur-Vevey, the restored home will form half of the attraction. A separate Hollywood studio-tour-type structure tracing his life from Victorian London boyhood to Hollywood screen legend will treat visitors to films, »

- Peter Mikelbank

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Charlie Chaplin Theme Park Aims for April Opening After Decade of Delays

17 February 2016 2:00 PM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Following years of delay, the Manoir de Ban, the Swiss home where Charlie Chaplin spent the last 25 years of his life, will finally open to the public in April, developers announced Monday, according to reports.Following extensive rebuilding and renovations, the stately home will act as the centerpiece of Chaplin's World, a theme park dedicated to "The Little Tramp." Set on an 18-acre property overlooking Lake Geneva in Corsier-sur-Vevey, the restored home will form half of the attraction. A separate Hollywood studio-tour-type structure tracing his life from Victorian London boyhood to Hollywood screen legend will treat visitors to films, »

- Peter Mikelbank

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Criterion Collection: The Kid | Blu-ray Review

16 February 2016 10:00 AM, PST | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Outfitted with a new score and title sequence, reedited sans several scenes involving the woman, and rereleased in 1972, Charlie Chaplin’s first feature length film The Kid has finally made its way to home video in HD thanks to the Cineteca di Bologna’s gloriously meticulous restoration and 4k digital transfer. Originally released back in 1921 after about a half decade of acting and eventually directing wildly popular shorts for Keystone Studios, the Essanay Film Manufacturing Company and finally the Mutual Film Corporation, the film endured a year long production amidst personal and professional crisis. It was thought that Chaplin’s signature brand of comedic slapstick, which typically ran just two reels of film, could not support the length of a six reel feature, but as is evidenced within, the film perfectly fuses Chaplin’s penchant for melodrama with his masterful vaudevillian humor to create an astonishingly emotional comedy that plumbs »

- Jordan M. Smith

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The Definitive Romantic Comedies: 10-1

9 January 2016 4:55 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Well, we’ve finally reached the summit: the 10 most definitive romantic comedies of all time. Unlike the other sections of this list, there is not a movie here that approaches “bad.” As always, some are better than others, despite the order. But one thing is for sure: if you plan to have a rom-com binge-a-thon soon, this is where you start, no questions asked. In fact, after reading this, you should go do that and report back.

courtesy of reverseshot.com 10. Some Like It Hot (1959)

What’s funnier than men dressing in drag? Depends on who you ask. It’s Billy Wilder again with a fictional story of two musicians – Joe (Tony Curtis) and Jerry (Jack Lemmon) – who witness the St. Valentine’s Day massacre in Chicago and leave town. But, since the mob has ties everywhere, they need to disguise themselves as best they can: as women in an »

- Joshua Gaul

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The Newsstand – Episode 51 – The March 2016 Criterion Collection Line-up and the Wacky New Year’s Drawing

7 January 2016 5:00 AM, PST | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

This month on the Newsstand, Ryan is joined by David Blakeslee, Scott Nye and Aaron West to discuss the March 2016 Criterion Collection line-up, the wacky New Year’s drawing, as well as the latest in Criterion rumors, news, packaging, and more.

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Shownotes Topics Criterion Close-Up joining the network The 2016 Wacky New Year’s Drawing The March 2016 Line-up Chimes at Midnight from Janus Films Recent Hulu, iTunes, Amazon and Fandor additions Tampopo New Phantom Pages (Klimov, Bondarchuk, Lerner, Dovzhenko) Blu-ray only releases upcoming in 2016: Hidden Fortress, City Lights, Tokyo Story. Haskell Wexler and Vilmos Zsigmond pass away. Episode Links Criterion Close-Up Joins Our Podcast Network! Criterion Close-Up – Episode 22 – A Room with a View Wacky New Years Drawing Hints At The Criterion Collection’s 2016 Line-Up Happy New Year! The March 2016 Criterion Collection line-up On… Paris Belongs to Us »

- Ryan Gallagher

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The WGA Names the 101 Funniest Screenplays of All Time

31 December 2015 5:13 PM, PST | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

Let’s end the year with a celebration of the funniest comedy scripts ever written. The Writer’s Guild of America has chosen the 101 best laugh-getting screenplays. Keep in mind that this is all about the writing, not the cast or the director.

1.Annie Hall (1977)

2. Some Like it Hot (1959)

3. Groundhog Day (1993)

4. Airplane! (1980)

5. Tootsie (1982)

6. Young Frankenstein (1974)

7. Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)

8. Blazing Saddles (1974)

9. Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975)

10. National Lampoon’s Animal House (1978)

11. This is Spinal Tap (1984)

12. The Producers (1967)

13. The Big Lebowski (1998)

14. Ghostbusters (1984)

15. When Harry Met Sally (1989)

16. Bridesmaids (2011)

17. Duck Soup (1933)

18. There’s Something About Mary (1998)

19. The Jerk (1979)

20. A Fish Called Wanda (1988)

21. His Girl Friday (1940)

22. The Princess Bride (1987)

23. Raising Arizona (1987)

24. Bringing Up Baby (1938)

25. Caddyshack (1980)

26. Monty Python’s Life of Brian (1979)

27. The Graduate (1967)

28. The Apartment (1960)

29. Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan (2006)

30. The Hangover (2009)

31. The 40-Year-Old Virgin (2005)

32. The Lady Eve »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Rob Young)

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2007

16 items from 2016


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