IMDb > City Lights (1931)
City Lights
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City Lights (1931) More at IMDbPro »

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City Lights -- The Tramp falls in love with a beautiful, blind flower girl who is in financial trouble.


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8.6/10   95,308 votes »
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Charles Chaplin (written by)
View company contact information for City Lights on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
7 March 1931 (USA) See more »
With the aid of a wealthy erratic tippler, a dewy-eyed tramp who has fallen in love with a sightless flower girl accumulates money to be able to help her medically. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
3 wins See more »
User Reviews:
You can't go wrong with Charlie Chaplin, but City Lights is even better than Chaplin's films usually are. See more (207 total) »


  (in credits order) (verified as complete)
Virginia Cherrill ... A Blind Girl
Florence Lee ... The Blind Girl's Grandmother
Harry Myers ... An Eccentric Millionaire
Al Ernest Garcia ... The Millionaire's Butler (as Allan Garcia)
Hank Mann ... A Prizefighter

Charles Chaplin ... A Tramp (as Charlie Chaplin)
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Jack Alexander ... Extra in Boxing Scene (uncredited)
T.S. Alexander ... Doctor (uncredited)
Victor Alexander ... Superstitious Boxer (uncredited)
Albert Austin ... Street Sweeper / Burglar (uncredited)
Harry Ayers ... Cop (uncredited)
Eddie Baker ... Boxing Fight Referee (uncredited)
Henry Bergman ... Mayor / Blind Girl's Downstairs Neighbor (uncredited)
Betty Blair ... Woman at Center of Table in Restaurant (uncredited)
Buster Brodie ... Bald Party Guest (uncredited)
Jeanne Carpenter ... Extra in Restaurant Scene (uncredited)
Marie Cooper ... Dancer (uncredited)
Tom Dempsey ... Boxer (uncredited)
Peter Diego ... Man in Mix-Up with Coat and Hat (uncredited)
James Donnelly ... Steet Sweepers' Foreman (uncredited)
Ray Erlenborn ... Newsboy (uncredited)
Mrs. Garcia ... Woman at Left of Table in Restaurant (uncredited)
Milton Gowman ... Extra in Street Scene (uncredited)
Robert Graves ... Police Officer (uncredited)
Charles Hammond ... Extra in Street Scene (uncredited)

Jean Harlow ... Extra in Restaurant Scene (uncredited)
Ad Herman ... Extra in Boxing Scene (uncredited)
Joseph Herrick ... Extra in Boxing Scene (uncredited)
Mrs. Hyams ... Flower Shop Assistant (uncredited)
Austen Jewell ... Newsboy (uncredited)
Willie Keeler ... Boxer (uncredited)
A.B. Lane ... Extra in Boxing Scene (uncredited)
Eddie McAuliffe ... Eddie Mason - Boxer (uncredited)
Margaret Oliver ... Extra in Street Scene (uncredited)
Robert Parrish ... Newsboy (uncredited)
Mrs. Pope ... Extra in Restaurant Scene (uncredited)
John Rand ... Tramp Who Dives for Cigar (uncredited)
Granville Redmond ... Sculptor (uncredited)
W.C. Robinson ... Man Who Throws Away Cigar (uncredited)
James Sheldon ... Young Man (uncredited)
Cy Slocum ... Extra in Boxing Scene (uncredited)
Tony Stabenau ... Victorious Boxer - Later Knocked Out (uncredited)
Mark Strong ... Man in Restaurant (uncredited)
Jack Sutherland ... Tall Man at Party (uncredited)
Joe Van Meter ... Burglar (uncredited)
Emmett Wagner ... Second (uncredited)
Tiny Ward ... Man in Elevator in Front of the Art Shop (uncredited)
Stanhope Wheatcroft ... Distinguished Gentleman in Cafe (uncredited)
Florence Wix ... Woman Who Sits on Cigar (uncredited)

Directed by
Charles Chaplin 
Writing credits
Charles Chaplin (written by)

Harry Clive  uncredited
Harry Crocker  uncredited

Produced by
Charles Chaplin .... producer (uncredited)
Original Music by
Charles Chaplin (music composed by)
Cinematography by
Gordon Pollock (photographer)
Roland Totheroh (photographer) (as Rollie Totheroh)
Film Editing by
Charles Chaplin (uncredited)
Willard Nico (uncredited)
Casting by
Al Ernest Garcia (uncredited)
Set Decoration by
Charles D. Hall (settings)
Production Management
Alfred Reeves .... production manager (uncredited)
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Albert Austin .... assistant director
Henry Bergman .... assistant director
Harry Crocker .... assistant director
Sound Department
Theodore Reed .... sound supervisor (uncredited)
Camera and Electrical Department
Ralph Barton .... still photographer (uncredited)
Mark Marlatt .... camera operator (uncredited)
Frank Testera .... gaffer (uncredited)
Editorial Department
Peter Culverwell .... assistant editor (1988 recording of Chaplin's score)
Tim Grover .... assistant editor (1988 recording of Chaplin's score)
Music Department
Carl Davis .... musical director (1988 recording of Chaplin's score)
Robert Hathaway .... music editor (1988 recording of Chaplin's score) (as Bob Hathaway)
John Hayward .... music dubbing mixer (1988 recording of Chaplin's score)
Arthur Johnston .... musical arrangement
Dick Lewzey .... music recordist (1988 recording of Chaplin's score)
Alfred Newman .... musical director
José Padilla .... composer: additional music
Paul Wing .... orchestral contractor (1988 recording of Chaplin's score)
Transportation Department
Toraichi Kono .... driver: Mr. Chaplin (uncredited)
Other crew
Kevin Brownlow .... supervisor (1988 recording of Chaplin's score)
David Gill .... supervisor (1988 recording of Chaplin's score)
Harry Crocker .... unit publicist (uncredited)
Carlyle Robinson .... press representative (uncredited)
Della Steele .... script supervisor (uncredited)
Crew verified as complete

Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies
  • Lansdowne Studios  recorded at (as C.T.S. Studios, London) (1988 recording of Chaplin's score)
  • Pinewood Studios  re-recording at (1988 recording of Chaplin's score)

Additional Details

Also Known As:
"City Lights: A Comedy Romance in Pantomime" - USA (copyright title)
See more »
87 min
Aspect Ratio:
1.20 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Silent | Mono (musical score)
Argentina:Atp | Australia:G | Denmark:A (2003) | France:U | Germany:6 (re-rating) (1997) | Netherlands:14 (1954) | Netherlands:14 (re-rating) (1954) | Netherlands:AL (re-rating) (1954) (slightly cut) | Netherlands:14 (original rating) (1931) | Netherlands:AL (re-rating) (1931) | Norway:7 | Portugal:M/6 (DVD rating) | South Korea:All | Spain:T | Sweden:Btl | UK:U | USA:Passed (National Board of Review) | USA:G (1972) | West Germany:12 (1951)

Did You Know?

When the film opened on 31 January 1931, Albert Einstein joined Charles Chaplin at the theater. When the film opened in England, George Bernard Shaw joined him.See more »
Revealing mistakes: When the Tramp is knocked out on the table in the locker room you see a pair of boxing gloves hooked on a post behind the table. The Tramp wakes up and struggles to sit up. The entire scene you can clearly see a wire attached to one of those gloves that when triggered, falls on his head, knocking him out once again.See more »
The Tramp:You can see now?
A Blind Girl:Yes, I can see now.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Flower Girl ThemeSee more »


Is this movie based on a book?
Why is it called "City Lights"?
What titles feature wacky boxing?
See more »
66 out of 80 people found the following review useful.
You can't go wrong with Charlie Chaplin, but City Lights is even better than Chaplin's films usually are., 22 December 2000
Author: Michael DeZubiria ( from Luoyang, China

Chaplin takes himself a little more seriously in City Lights, and the results are spectacular. The musical score which Chaplin composed for the film was one of the many highlights, and even though Charlie's performance is much more dramatic than usual in some scenes, the hilarious comedy for which he is known and loved is still abundant.

City Lights is so well made that it is one of the very few movies in which the obvious flaws can be gladly overlooked. Yes, you can clearly see the string holding Chaplin up in the sidesplittingly funny boxing scene, but who cares? That is such classic slapstick that little things like that really don't matter. Besides, let's keep in mind that this movie was made seventy years ago.

Chaplin does a phenomenal job in his traditional role of the tramp, and develops a perfectly convincing romantic relationship with the blind flower girl on the sidewalk. His friendship with the drunken rich guy is hilarious, but it also makes a significant comment about the problems of alcohol. This is truly a great film, which should not be forgotten.

Was the above review useful to you?
See more (207 total) »

Message Boards

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Recent Posts (updated daily)User
Is the ending the best in film history? laffalott1
did anyone catch... saferwaterss
Cars.... afbartlett
City Lights Make Up acaiello241
The original score? henrik-139
Question about the timeline in the film... (possible spoilers) ANDREWEHUNT
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