IMDb > Cimarron (1931)
Cimarron
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Cimarron (1931) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

User Rating:
6.0/10   2,949 votes »
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Up 3% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Writers:
Edna Ferber (novel)
Howard Estabrook (screen version)
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Cimarron on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
9 February 1931 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
World's Mightiest Show! See more »
Plot:
A newspaper editor settles in an Oklahoma boom town with his reluctant wife at the end of the nineteenth century. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Awards:
Won 3 Oscars. Another 2 wins & 4 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
Epic Frontier Film See more (56 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Richard Dix ... Yancey Cravat

Irene Dunne ... Sabra Cravat

Estelle Taylor ... Dixie Lee
Nance O'Neil ... Felice Venable
William Collier Jr. ... The Kid
Roscoe Ates ... Jesse Rickey (as Rosco Ates)

George E. Stone ... Sol Levy
Stanley Fields ... Lon Yountis
Robert McWade ... Louis Hefner
Edna May Oliver ... Mrs. Tracy Wyatt
Judith Barrett ... Donna Cravat (as Nancy Dover)
Eugene Jackson ... Isaiah
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Billy Mellman
Alice Adair ... (uncredited)
Max Barwyn ... Sabra's Luncheon Greeter (uncredited)
Frank Beal ... Louis Venable (uncredited)
Tyrone Brereton ... Dabney Venable (uncredited)
Dolores Brown ... Adult Ruby Big Elk (uncredited)
Frederick Burt ... (uncredited)
William P. Burt ... (uncredited)
Lois Jane Campbell ... Felice Venable, Jr. (uncredited)
Nino Cochise ... (uncredited)
Heinie Conklin ... (uncredited)
Nell Craig ... Arminta Greenwood (uncredited)
Frank Darien ... Mr. Bixby (uncredited)
Kay Deslys ... (uncredited)
Don Dillaway ... Adult Cim (uncredited)
William Elmer ... (uncredited)
Edith Fellows ... (uncredited)
Mildred Frizelle ... (uncredited)
Barney Furey ... (uncredited)
Otto Hoffman ... Murch Rankin (uncredited)
Harry Holden ... (uncredited)
Clara Hunt ... Indian Girl (uncredited)
William Janney ... Man Phoning Ambulance (uncredited)
Junior Johnson ... Child Cim (uncredited)
Bob Kortman ... Killer (uncredited)
Frank Lackteen ... Man Warning Yountis (uncredited)
Ethan Laidlaw ... (uncredited)
Lillian Lane ... Bella (uncredited)
Ann Lee ... Aunt Cassandra (uncredited)
Jack Leonard ... (uncredited)
Walter P. Lewis ... (uncredited)
George Lollier ... (uncredited)
Timothy J. Lonergan ... (uncredited)
Robert McKenzie ... Pat Leary (uncredited)
Marion Mirsch ... (uncredited)
Dennis O'Keefe ... (uncredited)
William Orlamond ... Grat Gotch (uncredited)
Helen Parrish ... Young Donna (uncredited)
Dorothy Raye ... (uncredited)
Henry Roquemore ... Jouett Goforth (uncredited)
Apache Bill Russell ... (uncredited)
Douglas Scott ... Toddler Cim (uncredited)
Reginald Scott ... Yancey Jr. (uncredited)
Dorothy Simms ... (uncredited)
Carl Stockdale ... (uncredited)
Reggie Streeter ... Yancey Jr (uncredited)
Helen Trask ... (uncredited)
Gloria Vonic ... Young Ruby Big Elk (uncredited)
Ford West ... (uncredited)
Lillian West ... (uncredited)
Leo Willis ... (uncredited)

Directed by
Wesley Ruggles (uncredited)
 
Writing credits
Edna Ferber (novel)

Howard Estabrook (screen version)

Howard Estabrook (dialogue)

Louis Sarecky  contributing writer (uncredited)

Produced by
William LeBaron .... producer
Wesley Ruggles .... producer
Louis Sarecky .... associate producer
 
Original Music by
Max Steiner (uncredited)
 
Cinematography by
Edward Cronjager (photographed by)
 
Film Editing by
William Hamilton 
 
Costume Design by
Max Rée 
 
Makeup Department
Ern Westmore .... makeup artist (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Doran Cox .... assistant director (uncredited)
B. Reeves Eason .... second unit director (uncredited)
F.D. Langton .... assistant director (uncredited)
Dewey Starkey .... assistant director (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Max Rée .... scenery
Sidney Ullman .... assistant art director (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Clem Portman .... sound recordist
Ralph Spotts .... assistant recordist (uncredited)
 
Special Effects by
Lloyd Knechtel .... special effects
 
Stunts
Bob Burns .... trick rider (uncredited)
Rex Cole .... trick rider (uncredited)
Ken Cooper .... trick rider (uncredited)
Lee Cooper .... trick rider (uncredited)
Bob Erickson .... trick rider (uncredited)
'Shorty' Hall .... trick rider (uncredited)
Pete Janet .... trick rider (uncredited)
Charles Johnson .... trick rider (uncredited)
Buff Jones .... trick rider (uncredited)
Gordon Jones .... trick rider (uncredited)
Bud Pope .... trick rider (uncredited)
Hank Potts .... trick rider (uncredited)
Walt Robbins .... trick rider (uncredited)
Whitten Sovern .... trick rider (uncredited)
Whitehorse .... trick rider (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
E.F. Adams .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Willard Barth .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Neal Beckner .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Guy Bennett .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Otto Benninger .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Fred Bentley .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Joseph F. Biroc .... assistant camera (uncredited)
Osmond Borradaile .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
H. Lyman Broening .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Francis Burgess .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Paul Cable .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Emillo Calori .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Roy Clark .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Rex Curtis .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Dean Dailey .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
James Daly .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
James Lee Davis .... grip (uncredited)
L. De Angelis .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Robert De Grasse .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
George E. Diskant .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Linwood G. Dunn .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Elmer Dyer .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Mack Elliott .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Eddie Garvin .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Pliny Goodfriend .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Jack Grout .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Neal Harbarger .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Ted Hayes .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Bill Heckler .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Edward Henderson .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Fred Hendrickson .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Fred Hendrickson .... still photographer (uncredited)
Russell Hoover .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Newton Hopcraft .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Harry Jackson .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
William S. Johnson .... chief electrician (uncredited)
Maurice E. Kains .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Harry Kaufman .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Edward Kearns .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
James V. King .... assistant camera (uncredited)
James V. King .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Edward A. Kull .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Jack Landrigan .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Joseph LaShelle .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Fred Mayer .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Earl Metz .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Nicholas Musuraca .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Joe Novak .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Robert Pittack .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Eddie Pyle .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Frank Redman .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
William Schuck .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Lester Shorr .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Al Smalley .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
John Thompson .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Rod Tolmie .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Edward Ullman .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Harry L. Underwood .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Joseph Walters .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Harold E. Wellman .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Ben White .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Harry J. Wild .... assistant camera (uncredited)
Rex Wimpy .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
Lothrop B. Worth .... camera crew member: land rush scenes (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Eugene Joseff .... jeweller (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Max Steiner .... conductor (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Hyatt Daab .... general press representative (uncredited)
Harold Hendee .... researcher (uncredited)
Judd Steven .... location meals served by (uncredited)
 
Thanks
A.B. MacDonald .... acknowledgement: from Miss Ferber for certain descriptive passages in 'Hands Up' by
Fred E. Sutton .... acknowledgement: from Miss Ferber for certain descriptive passages in 'Hands Up' by
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
123 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.20 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (RCA Photophone System)
Certification:
Argentina:Atp | USA:Passed (National Board of Review) | USA:Approved (PCA #1029: 2 July 1935 for re-release)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The land rush scene took a week to film, using 5,000 extras, 28 cameramen, 6 still photographers and 27 camera assistants.See more »
Goofs:
Anachronisms: During the period of the film set in 1907, Yancey is the Progressive Party's candidate for governor of Oklahoma. The Progressive Party did not form until 1912, and then disbanded after Theodore Roosevelt's unsuccessful third party candidacy that year.See more »
Quotes:
Mrs. Tracy Wyatt:One of my ancestors was a signer of the Declaration of Independence.
Sol Levy:That's all right. A relative of mine, a fellow named Moses, wrote the Ten Commandments.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Featured in Return of the Bad Men (1948)See more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
27 out of 32 people found the following review useful.
Epic Frontier Film, 13 June 2003
Author: Ron Oliver (revilorest@juno.com) from Forest Ranch, CA

A charismatic Kansas lawyer takes his bride to the Oklahoma Territory's CIMARRON Country to start a newspaper in the violent, rawboned town of Osage.

Edna Ferber's sprawling novel of frontier life comes to the big screen in a film deemed fine enough to win a few Oscars, including Best Picture. It was one of the first great epics of the Sound Era and is still very entertaining to watch. Occasionally there is a bit of overacting, perhaps, and technical difficulties with the microphones can be discerned while trying to hear the stars' voices clearly during some crowd scenes, but this in no way detracts from the enjoyment of viewing the film.

The performance of Richard Dix as pioneer & dreamer Yancey Cravat has been criticized as being too florid and overripe, but this is unfair. The popular actor had his roots in silent films when acting techniques were somewhat different, but this robust style perfectly suits the energetic wanderlust of his character. Anything less than abundant enthusiasm would look silly in a fellow called upon to deliver a sermon and shoot an outlaw almost simultaneously, vigorously champion the rights of fallen women and racial minorities and yet still blithely abandon his family for long years as he follows his own star of destiny. Call it what you may, Dix's performance can certainly never be tagged as being dull.

Irene Dunne, as Yancey's wife Sabra - his ‘Sugar' - provides the calm emotional center for the film. She is the one who holds the family and newspaper together while her husband is off bringing civilization to other frontiers. She is even able to achieve substantial business and political importance. What saves Dunne's performance from becoming too sweet is the story giving her a few personality wrinkles to deal with, most notably her determination to destroy the town's bawdy house madam (well played by Estelle Taylor) and her intense bigotry towards the local Indians. Her growth as a human being is juxtaposed with that of Oklahoma's expansion as a state.

Some fine character actors provide prime entertainment value: stuttering Roscoe Ates as the Cravats' faithful printer; George E. Stone as a gentle Jewish peddler who becomes a firm family friend; Stanley Fields as a town tough who tangles with the wrong hombre; William Collier Jr in a brief, vibrant outlaw role as The Kid; and Eugene Jackson as the young Black servant who gives the ultimate sacrifice of loyalty to the Cravats. Marvelous gossipy Edna May Oliver, replete with snooty sniffs & piercing glances, neatly tucks all her scenes as a society matron into her handbag and stalks off with them.

With production costs of 1.5 million dollars, RKO could give CIMARRON excellent production values, featuring crowds of extras and very realistic sets. A few of the scenes are classics and remain in the mind for a long time: the 1889 Land Rush sequence which opens the film; the church service in the saloon; the gun battle in the dusty street. It is very interesting to watch how the town of Osage changes during the movie, from a dangerous dirty settlement to an Oklahoma metropolis in 1930, all achieved most convincingly for the screen.

*************************

The Cimarron is a wild & unruly river that arises in New Mexico and runs for about 600 miles before becoming a tributary of the Arkansas River near Tulsa, Oklahoma. The word is Old Spanish and refers to the thickets along the River and the bighorn sheep which inhabited them

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