IMDb > Earth (1930)
Zemlya
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guide
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Earth (1930) More at IMDbPro »Zemlya (original title)

Photos (See all 5 | slideshow)

Overview

User Rating:
7.5/10   3,705 votes »
Your Rating:
Saving vote...
Deleting vote...
/10   (delete | history)
Sorry, there was a problem
Popularity: ?
Up 6% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Writer:
Aleksandr Dovzhenko (written by)
Contact:
View company contact information for Earth on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
17 October 1930 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
In the peaceful countryside, Vassily opposes the rich kulaks over the coming of collective farming. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
1 win & 1 nomination See more »
User Reviews:
True communist poetry. See more (41 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (complete, awaiting verification)
Stepan Shkurat ... Opanas (as S. Shkurat)
Semyon Svashenko ... Vasili 'Basil' Opanas (as S. Svashenko)

Yuliya Solntseva ... Vasili's Sister (as Yu. Solntseva)
Yelena Maksimova ... Natalya - Vasili's Fiancee (as Ye. Maksimova)
Nikolai Nademsky ... Semyon 'Simon' Opanas (as N. Nademsky)
Ivan Franko ... Arkhip Whitehorse - Khoma's Father (as I. Franko)
Pyotr Masokha ... Khoma 'Thomas' Whitehorse (as P. Masokha)
Vladimir Mikhaylov ... Village Priest (as V. Mikhajlov)
Pavel Petrik ... Young Party-Cell Leader (as P. Petrik)
P. Umanets ... Chairman of the Village Farm Soviet
Ye. Bondina ... Farm Girl
Luka Lyashenko ... Young Kulak (as L. Lyashenko)
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Vasiliy Krasenko ... Old Peter (uncredited)
M. Matsyutsia ... Farm Girl (uncredited)
Nikolai Mikhajlov ... The Pope (uncredited)

Directed by
Aleksandr Dovzhenko 
 
Writing credits
(in alphabetical order)
Aleksandr Dovzhenko  written by

Original Music by
Vyacheslav Ovchinnikov (1971) (as V. Ovchinnikov)
Alexander Popov (1997)
Lev Revutsky (uncredited)
 
Cinematography by
Daniil Demutsky  (as Daniil Demutski)
 
Film Editing by
Aleksandr Dovzhenko (uncredited)
 
Art Direction by
Vasili Krichevsky  (as Basil Krichevski)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Lazar Bodik .... assistant director (as L. Bodik)
Yuliya Solntseva .... assistant director (as J. Solntseva)
 
Music Department
Vyacheslav Ovchinnikov .... conductor (1971 restored version) (as V. Ovchinnikov)
Frank Strobel .... conductor (1997)
 
Other crew
Stephen P. Hill .... intertitler: English (1975 version)
 
Crew believed to be complete


Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
"Zemlya" - Soviet Union (original title)
See more »
Runtime:
75 min | USA:73 min (1991 Kino video)
Country:
Aspect Ratio:
1.33 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Company:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Soviet censors made Aleksandr Dovzhenko eliminate a number of scenes from the film, including a shot of peasants urinating in a tractor radiator and a scene where a dead man's fiancée mourns him in the nude.See more »
Quotes:
Opanas:As my Basil was killed for a new life, so I'm asking you to bury him in a new way.See more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
27 out of 40 people found the following review useful.
True communist poetry., 7 March 2006
Author: miloc from Bronx, New York

From its opening, with an elderly man dying surrounded by impassive adults and obliviously playing children, to its wildly emotional finale, this breathtaking silent work transcends its politics and functions as poetry. It's unmistakeably Soviet -- the messianic fervor of the scene in which the farming community greets the arrival of a tractor would seem like parody if it weren't for Dovzhenko's extraordinary sense of lyricism. Using repeated shots of the expectant farmers crying out "It's coming!" intercut with an empty horizon, he builds the moment so completely that you're excited in spite of yourself; you totally believe in that tractor. (As one of the "rich farmers" says, shellshocked by this threat to their future, "It's a fact. It's here.")

To call the film propaganda, while true, seems rather beside the point. Aren't all films? Dovzhenko's manipulations are certainly no less devious than those of western film. Switch the communist message to a patriotic or even capitalist one, and the setting to the World War II Pacific or the old west or wherever you choose and it's no different than, say, "Shane" or "Gone With the Wind" or "The Passion of the Christ" -- just much, much better.

The story, told in rich montages of motionless figures, fruit, machinery, skies, rippling fields, and above all faces, weaves its "official" message about collective farms and private property with larger themes of religion, the generation gap, and the cycle of life: the Earth that gives life takes it away. A group of children giggle and spy on an old man listening at his friend's grave for a last message; a man sits up on his deathbed to eat a last sweet pear; a serious young radical, alone, gives himself up to a joyful moonlit dance before falling into the dirt. Dovzhenko's approach has less to do with narrative than with creating visual textures; it looks as though Terrence Malick watched this more than a few times before making "Days of Heaven." Dovzhenko's discontinuities and repetitions can be initially bewildering, but they pack a concrete wallop. The images accumulate and crystallize, carrying greater and greater weight, and, as an aging farmer becomes suddenly radicalized by tragedy, the direct shots of his face, hardening in bewilderment and outrage, take on a thunderous power.

Was the above review useful to you?
See more (41 total) »

Related Links

Full cast and crew Company credits External reviews
News articles IMDb Drama section IMDb Soviet Union section

You may report errors and omissions on this page to the IMDb database managers. They will be examined and if approved will be included in a future update. Clicking the 'Edit page' button will take you through a step-by-step process.