MOVIEmeter
SEE RANK
Down 45,072 this week

The Widow from Chicago (1930)

7.0
Your rating:
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 -/10 X  
Ratings: 7.0/10 from 154 users  
Reviews: 8 user | 1 critic

Vice lord Dominic has brought Swifty Dorgan east to do a job for him. When Swifty appears to have died falling from a train, detective Henderson impersonates him hoping to get into the mob.... See full summary »

Director:

(as Edward Cline)

Writer:

(screen version & dialogue)
0Check in
0Share...

User Lists

Related lists from IMDb users

a list of 100 titles
created 26 Jan 2012
 
a list of 1964 titles
created 26 May 2012
 
a list of 291 titles
created 04 Jun 2012
 
a list of 4121 titles
created 15 Jan 2013
 
a list of 3236 titles
created 5 months ago
 

Connect with IMDb


Share this Rating

Title: The Widow from Chicago (1930)

The Widow from Chicago (1930) on IMDb 7/10

Want to share IMDb's rating on your own site? Use the HTML below.

Take The Quiz!

Test your knowledge of The Widow from Chicago.
Edit

Cast

Complete credited cast:
Alice White ...
Polly
...
Dominic
...
'Swifty' Dorgan
Frank McHugh ...
Slug
Lee Shumway ...
Johnston
Brooks Benedict ...
Mullins
E.H. Calvert ...
Davis
Betty Francisco ...
Helen
Harold Goodwin ...
Jimmy
Edit

Storyline

Vice lord Dominic has brought Swifty Dorgan east to do a job for him. When Swifty appears to have died falling from a train, detective Henderson impersonates him hoping to get into the mob. When he's killed his sister Polly poses as Swifty's widow and gets a singing job at Dominic's nightclub. Then the real Swifty shows up. Written by Ed Stephan <stephan@cc.wwu.edu>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

WIDOW STEALS GANGSTERS LOVE (original print ad - call caps - ad shows woman reading newspaper headline)

Genres:

Crime | Drama | Romance

Certificate:

Not Rated
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

23 November 1930 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The Widow from Chicago  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (Turner library print)

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

This film is the first one made under Edward G. Robinson's 1930 contract with Warner Bros. that called for him to appear in four pictures at a flat $35,000 per picture. See more »

Connections

References Way Down East (1920) See more »

Soundtracks

Get Happy
(1930) (uncredited)
Music by Harold Arlen
Played as dance music at the Crystal Dance Palace
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
"The Widow" towers over Little Caesar
10 July 2003 | by (Easley, SC) – See all my reviews

And I'll support that conclusion. However, I must preface my commentary by acceding to a predilection for Alice White's performances. I adore her no-apologies-for-pert, straight-ahead style that was the antithesis of 'real' actors who rolled their R's and eyes at every opportunity.

We are introduced to Polly (Alice White) and Jimmy (Harold Goodwin) as new tenants by the neighbors' gossiping. Are they married? The question remains unanswered until just before Jimmy, the precinct's newbie detective, leaves for work. The clever script puts a smile on your face just as Jimmy waves at his sister, Polly from the street, and becomes a drive-by shooting victim.

The scripts' powerful counterpoints and wit are enhanced by director Edward Cline's smart pacing and Sol Polito's brilliant photography. The avenging Polly, masquerades to mob boss Dominic (Edward G. Robinson) as the widow of a dead associate of the gang. But she becomes trapped in his office when the 'widow's husband returns from the dead. When Dominic goes out to meet him, we are left with a great insert of the edge of the office door. Slightly ajar, we watch it in anticipation while Dominic meets Polly's 'dead' husband. Will she make a break for it? Will Swifty confront her? Your mind races as the camera holds on that door. It's bravura filmmaking, and Cline keeps it coming. By the way, Polly embraces her 'husband' whispering "go along, I'm on the spot". The excitement's just beginning, Swifty is only too happy to go home with his 'wife'.

Neil Hamilton handles his role as Swifty Dorgan with effective menace, and Polly goes from being on the spot in Dominic's office to being in a spot behind her own (now locked) door. Frank McHugh's got a fine bit as one of Dominic's hentchmen 'Slug', and advises his fellow thug, Mullins, to give up the girl he can't get along with. Slug's smugness melts, however, when Mullins returns the girl's key only to discover the key is to Slug's girlfriend's apartment.

Earl Baldwin's script has plenty of sparks left, and Polito takes the shootout in the dark to a new level when a spotlight is introduced: not only being shot at, but everything its prowling eye touches gets killed. You'll wonder why Little Caesar is famous after seeing this terrific gangster film.


5 of 6 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Recent Posts
Swastikas on Swifty's Suitcase cowgoesmoo
Discuss The Widow from Chicago (1930) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?