5.5/10
86
5 user 4 critic

Sweet Kitty Bellairs (1930)

Passed | | Musical, Romance | 5 September 1930 (USA)
Kitty Bellairs, a flirtatious young woman of 18th Century England, cuts a swath of broken hearts and romantic conquests as she visits a resort with her sister.

Director:

Writers:

(a musical version of the stage play by), (and the novel by) | 2 more credits »
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On Disc

at Amazon

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
...
Sir Jasper Standish
...
Lord Varney
Perry Askam ...
Capt. O'Hara
...
Julia
...
Colonel Villiers
Arthur Edmund Carewe ...
Capt. Spicer
Douglas Gerrard ...
Tom Stafford
...
Gossip
Christiane Yves ...
Lydia
...
Rheumatic Old Man
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Storyline

Kitty Bellairs, a flirtatious young woman of 18th Century England, cuts a swath of broken hearts and romantic conquests as she visits a resort with her sister. Written by Jim Beaver <jumblejim@prodigy.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Musical | Romance

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

5 September 1930 (USA)  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Vitaphone)

Color:

(2-strip Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.20 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

A B&W nitrate print of this film survives in the UCLA Film and Television Archives and is not listed for Preservation. See more »

Connections

Version of Sweet Kitty Bellairs (1916) See more »

Soundtracks

Song of the Town of Bath
(1930) (uncredited)
Written by Walter O'Keefe and Robert Emmett Dolan (as Bobby Dolan)
Performed by chorus
See more »

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User Reviews

 
interesting Curio
5 November 2015 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

This film is an interesting curio of the progress of early sound films and the musical glut that killed off the genre for several years. The original film (in Technicolor--no longer) is lavish and is very much an operetta with sung dialogue, connecting musical sequences, and musical underscoring. It's all way-overplayed and the morals on display are rather questionable. What is interesting is the continuity of music and scenes, outdoor recording and camera work, camera movement, and tracking shots which required pre-or post recording after the film had been finished. The whole picture is edited and recorded very professionally probably by the most advanced studio in these techniques at the time. The film is technically impressive and if you're into old movies its worth 63 minutes of your time.


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