5.3/10
66
6 user 1 critic

Strictly Unconventional (1930)

Passed | | Drama | 3 May 1930 (USA)
Reviews
Edit

Cast

Complete credited cast:
Catherine Dale Owen ...
...
Ted
Tyrell Davis ...
...
...
...
Mary Forbes ...
Wilfred Noy ...
Butler
...
Footman (as William O'Brien)
Edit

Storyline

Add Full Plot | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

horse | vase | party | orchestra | nobility | See All (19) »

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

3 May 1930 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Iris  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.20 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

When it was originally released in April 1930, Strictly Unconventional ran 72 minutes, but, by the time it found its way to New York City in July 1930, (for a one day showing on a double bill at Loew's), MGM had cut it to 54 minutes, and this is the version which survives today on Turner Classic Movies. See more »

Quotes

Elizabeth: You're awfully nice, Ted.
See more »

Connections

Version of The Circle (1925) See more »

Soundtracks

Kunstlerleben (Artist's Life), Op. 316
(1867) (uncredited)
Music by Johann Strauss
Played as dance music by the orchestra at the party
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Good, workmanlike drawing-room comic melodrama
16 November 2005 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

This film has its weaknesses, starting with its silly title (the original title of the W. Somerset Maugham play it's based on, "The Circle," is better and should have been retained) and some of the ridiculous makeups the actors are forced to wear (Lewis Stone especially — it took me a while to discern his familiar features under all that greasepaint and hair cream), but all in all it's a good drawing room comedy/melodrama. Like Oscar Wilde and Noël Coward, Maugham was a (mostly) Gay writer whose sensibility came out (so to speak) in a jaundiced view of heterosexuality, and there are several unusual aspects to this plot — including the fascinating twist that 30 years after they did the dashingly romantic thing of running off together without first divorcing their spouses, Lord Porteous (Ernest Torrence) and Lady Champion-Cheney (Alison Skipworth) are as miserable as any married couple could possibly be after that length of time. I'd heard so many bad things about Catherine Dale Owen over the years that it was a surprise to see one of her films and actually find her quite good — energetic, high-spirited and fully in command of her role — and of course it's also always a treat to see Alison Skipworth, the one person who ever stole a scene from W. C. Fields and the principal villain (a sex-changed version of the Sydney Greenstreet role) in the otherwise pretty dismal second version of "The Maltese Falcon," called "Satan met a Lady." Her costume — representing an attempt to dress as a youthful coquette, defying her extra years and bulk — is itself a piece of minor film-making genius. David Burton's direction is mostly commonplace but has some inspired moments, notably the animation of the young Lady Champion-Cheney's photo in the album early on. And at only 56 minutes, the film lasts just as long as it needs to for the story it has to tell and isn't padded out to fill extra running time the way so many films are today.


9 of 10 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Recent Posts
Catherine Dale Owen amidadi
Discuss Strictly Unconventional (1930) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?