Singer Ruth Eton, of the singing team of Eton and Farrell, is told by her agents to get rid of her partner if she wants to advance her career. Instead, she gives him singing lessons. After ... See full summary »

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(uncredited)
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Jay Velie ...
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Singer Ruth Eton, of the singing team of Eton and Farrell, is told by her agents to get rid of her partner if she wants to advance her career. Instead, she gives him singing lessons. After a few months of training, he is good enough to be on his own and dumps Eton. When he loses his voice suddenly, he finds out who his true friends are. Written by David Glagovsky <dglagovsky@prodigy.net>

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singer | See All (1) »

Genres:

Musical | Short

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9 December 1930 (USA)  »

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1.37 : 1
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Vitaphone production reels #1122-1123. See more »

Soundtracks

Don't Tell Her What Happened to Me
by Buddy G. DeSylva, Lew Brown and Ray Henderson
Sung by Jay Velie
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A Little Look At Ruth Etting
18 September 2001 | by (Forest Ranch, CA) – See all my reviews

A Warner Bros. VITAPHONE VARIETIES Short Subject.

A celebrated vaudeville chanteuse gives her unappreciated accompanist ONE GOOD TURN, much to her regret...

This is a pleasant little film, if somewhat uneven stylistically, which features Miss Ruth Etting, one of the popular singers of the period. She is in good voice - singing 'If I Could Be With You' with co-star Jay Velie - and handles the dramatic aspects of the role competently.

In the early days of the Talkies, when the movies were still reveling in their discovery of Sound - and, consequently, Noise

  • the musical Short Subject was a very natural development.


Here the Studios could showcase vocal talent quite economically and gauge the audiences' responses. Virtual unknowns might become superstars, while veteran Broadway performers, without screen charisma, could quickly fizzle. Many of these Shorts still exist, allowing us to peep into a bygone era when Tin Pan Alley first collided with Hollywood.


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