6.1/10
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11 user 2 critic

New Moon (1930)

Passed | | Drama, Musical, Romance | 17 January 1931 (USA)
New Moon is the name of the ship crossing the Caspian Sea. A young Lt. Petroff meets the Princess Tanya and they have a ship board romance. Upon arriving at the port of Krasnov, Petroff ... See full summary »

Director:

Writers:

(book) (as Oscar Hammerstein 2nd), (book) | 4 more credits »
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
...
Princess Tanya Strogoff
...
Governor Boris Brusiloff
...
Count Strogoff
Gus Shy ...
Potkin
...
Countess Anastasia Strogoff
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Frankie Genardi
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Storyline

New Moon is the name of the ship crossing the Caspian Sea. A young Lt. Petroff meets the Princess Tanya and they have a ship board romance. Upon arriving at the port of Krasnov, Petroff learns that Tanya is engaged to the old Governor Brusiloff. Petroff, disillusioned, crashes the ball to talk with Tanya. Found by Brusiloff, they invent a story about her lost bracelet. To reward him, and remove him, Brusiloff sends Petroff to the remote, and deadly, Fort Darvaz. Soon, the big battle against overwhelming odds will begin. Written by Tony Fontana <tony.fontana@spacebbs.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama | Musical | Romance

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

17 January 1931 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Parisian Belle  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.20 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

When first sold to television in 1957, this film was retitled Parisian Belle in order to avoid confusion with _New Moon_ (1940), which was also in the same package of over 700 MGM titles. However, whereas Parisian Belle would have been an appropriate title for the 1940 version, which followed more closely the original story, it was a misnomer for this 1930 version whose locale had been moved to Russia, and whose heroine, the Parisian Belle of the stage play and 1940 version, had now become a Russian princess. But it was so seldom broadcast at that time that nobody seemed to notice or care. Its first, and perhaps only telecast in New York City occurred on the Late, Late Show Monday 22 September 1958 on WCBS (Channel 2); in San Francisco it first aired Tuesday 1 March 1960 on KGO (Channel 7). Since that time, its original title has been restored, and its safely housed in the Turner Classic Film Library, from which it is occasionally aired on Turner Classic Movies. See more »

Goofs

The credits list "New Moon" as the title of the original operetta, but its title was "The New Moon". See more »

Connections

Referenced in Deep in My Heart (1954) See more »

Soundtracks

What Is Your Price Madam?
(1929) (uncredited)
Music by Herbert Stothart
Lyrics by Clifford Grey
Played by the orchestra at the ball and sung by Lawrence Tibbett
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User Reviews

Awkward
16 January 2004 | by See all my reviews

Having deleted much of the music in the stage production, the film makers injected a lengthy battle sequence - presumably to offer something the original could not. This was a regrettable decision for an operetta, as it alters the tone of the film to such an extent that the romance, sweetness and charm of the earlier segments are pushed to the background, and music seems inappropriate for what follows. The editing of this film, particularly in those battle scenes, is heavy-handed; but even the light moments are pockmarked by overly-long pauses, and shots of sets that remain empty for several seconds, until someone walks into the frame.

Lawrence Tibbett lacks the commanding presence of a leading man. He and Grace Moore do not make for an electrifying couple. She looks old enough to be his mother (or, more charitably, he looks young enough to be her son). Of course, they sing beautifully and/or vigorously, as required. That's why they're in the picture. But it's not enough. Little or no help from Roland Young and Gus Shy in supposedly humorous supporting roles.


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