IMDb > Madam Satan (1930)
Madam Satan
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Madam Satan (1930) More at IMDbPro »

Photos (See all 11 | slideshow)

Overview

User Rating:
6.7/10   355 votes »
Your Rating:
Saving vote...
Deleting vote...
/10   (delete | history)
Sorry, there was a problem
MOVIEmeter: ?
Up 37% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Contact:
View company contact information for Madam Satan on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
20 September 1930 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
Angela and Bob Brooks are an upper class couple. Unfortunately, Bob is an unfaithful husband. But Angela... See more » | Add synopsis »
NewsDesk:
(5 articles)
Pre-Code Hollywood 2: Music, Comedy, Action and Adventure
 (From CinemaNerdz. 31 January 2014, 7:40 AM, PST)

Pre-Code Hollywood: Gangsters, Monsters, and Dames
 (From CinemaNerdz. 31 January 2014, 7:20 AM, PST)

Towards A Pure Fiction: Cecil B. DeMille
 (From MUBI. 18 March 2013, 6:10 AM, PDT)

User Reviews:
Mad Masquerade Party See more (28 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Kay Johnson ... Angela Brooks

Reginald Denny ... Bob Brooks

Lillian Roth ... Trixie

Roland Young ... Jimmy Wade
Elsa Peterson ... Martha
Jack King ... Herman
Eddie Prinz ... Biff (as Edward Prinz)
Boyd Irwin ... Captain
Wallace MacDonald ... First Mate
Tyler Brooke ... Romeo
Ynez Seabury ... Babo
Theodore Kosloff ... Electricity
Julanne Johnston ... Miss Conning Tower
Martha Sleeper ... Fish Girl
Doris McMahon ... Water
Vera Marshe ... Call of the Wild (as Vera Marsh)
Albert Conti ... Empire Officer
Earl Askam ... Pirate
Rina De Liguoro ... Spain (as Countess De Liguoro)

Katharine Irving ... Spider Girl
Lotus Thompson ... Eve
Aileen Ransom ... Victory
Abe Lyman and His Band
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Abe Lyman ... Band Leader
Judith Arlen ... (uncredited)
Wilson Benge ... Zeppelin Butler (uncredited)
Jack Byron ... (uncredited)

Mary Carlisle ... Little Bo Peep (uncredited)
Edwards Davis ... Henry VIII (uncredited)

Marie Deauville ... Mrs. High Hat (uncredited)
Dorothy Dehn ... (uncredited)

Cecil B. DeMille ... Radio Newscaster (voice) (uncredited)
Katherine DeMille ... Zeppelin Reveler (uncredited)
Betty Francisco ... Little Rolls Riding Hood (uncredited)
Bud Geary ... Zeppelin Crewman (uncredited)
Kenneth Gibson ... (uncredited)
Vera Gordon ... (uncredited)
Ella Hall ... (uncredited)
Kasha Haroldi ... (uncredited)
Lorimer Johnston ... (uncredited)
June Knight ... Zeppelin Reveler (uncredited)
Allan Lane ... Zeppelin Majordomo (uncredited)
Nora Lane ... Zeppelin Reveler (uncredited)
Wilfred Lucas ... Roman Senator (uncredited)
Elvira Lucianti ... (uncredited)
Mary McAllister ... (uncredited)
Earl McCarthy ... Zeppelin Reveler (uncredited)
June Nash ... (uncredited)
Louis Natheaux ... Arabian Prince (uncredited)
Philip Sleeman ... Zeppelin Reveler (uncredited)
Henry Stockbridge ... (uncredited)
Natalie Storm ... (uncredited)
Margaret Swope ... (uncredited)
Youcca Troubetzkov ... (uncredited)
Marie Valli ... Confusion (uncredited)
Dorothy Vernon ... (uncredited)
Natalie Visart ... (uncredited)

Directed by
Cecil B. DeMille 
 
Writing credits
Jeanie Macpherson (by) &
Gladys Unger (by) and
Elsie Janis (by)

Produced by
Cecil B. DeMille .... producer (uncredited)
 
Original Music by
William Axt (foreign version) (uncredited)
 
Cinematography by
Harold Rosson (photographed by)
 
Film Editing by
Anne Bauchens (film editor)
 
Art Direction by
Cedric Gibbons 
Mitchell Leisen 
 
Costume Design by
Adrian (gowns)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Mitchell Leisen .... assistant director
Cullen Tate .... assistant director
 
Art Department
Cedric Gibbons .... set designer (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Douglas Shearer .... recording director
 
Other crew
LeRoy Prinz .... dance director (as Le Roy Prinz)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
116 min (TCM print)
Country:
Language:
Sound Mix:
Mono (Western Electric Sound System)
Certification:
Canada:PG (Manitoba) (VHS) | Portugal:M/12 | Portugal:17 (original rating) | USA:Passed (National Board of Review)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Two songs not used in the film: "This Is Love" - music by Herbert Stothart and lyrics by Clifford Grey; and "Satan's Song" - music by Jack King and lyrics by Elsie Janis.See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: Angela closes the same door twice when she visits Trixie's appartment.See more »
Quotes:
Angela Brooks:[French accent] You are een love weez love!See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in Bright Leaves (2003)See more »
Soundtrack:
The ChatterersSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
9 out of 11 people found the following review useful.
Mad Masquerade Party, 27 April 2004
Author: lugonian from Kissimmee, Florida

MADAM Satan (MGM, 1930), directed by Cecil B. DeMille, marked the famed director's second of three features under the MGM banner, and one of his most unusual, or in the most common terms, bizarre. In spite of it not becoming a box office success in its initial release, MADAM Satan needs to be seen a few times in order to get the full concept of the continuity. Once getting through some dull stretches taking place during its initial 50 minutes, the movie delivers during its final portion to this 115 minute production with its one of the most oddest costume parties and inane production numbers ever captured on film.

The plot, which could very well be THE GUARDSMAN (1931, with Alfred Lunt and Lynne Fontanne) or THE CHOCOLATE SOLDIER (1941, with Nelson Eddy and Rise Stevens, which in turn is based on "The Guardsman") in reverse, focuses on Angela (Kay Johnson), a boring but cultured New York City society woman married to the prominent but fun loving Bob Brooks (Reginald Denny). Her casual evening at home stirs some excitement after reading in a newspaper that she, along with Bob and his best friend, Jim Wade (Roland Young) were taken to night court for speeding. Wanting to learn more about what her husband has been doing, and who the woman masquerading as her husband's wife is, Angela's suspicions are soon realized when she finds a calling card in Bob's pocket signed by a Trixie. Feeling her marriage dissolved because of Bob's lack of interest in her, Angela decides to follow the advice of Martha, her maid (Elsa Peterson) to go out and recapture her own husband by fascinating him. During Jim Wade's elaborate costume party, which takes place in a gigantic airship, Angela enters the social scene disguised as the masked woman who calls herself "Madam Satan."

Categorized as a musical, the production numbers set during the masquerade party are of more interest than the songs that accompany them. With the music and lyrics credited to Clifford Grey, Herbert Stothart, Elsie Janis and Jack Grey, the songs featured include: "Live and Love Today" (sung by Elsa Peterson); "Low Down" (sung by Lillian Roth); "We're Going Somewhere" (sung by party guests as they enter dirigible); "The Cat Walk" (performed by guests); "Ballet Electrique" (performed by Theodore Kosloff as Electricity, surrounded by costumed dancers in an electrical ballet stimulating everything from spark plugs to lightning bolts); "What Am I Bid?/Auction Number" (recited by Roland Young); "Madame" (sung by Kay Johnson); "All I Know is You Are in My Arms" (sung and danced by Reginald Denny and Kay Johnson); "Low Down" (reprise by Lillian Roth, later sung by Kay Johnson); and "Madame" (reprise by Kay Johnson).

Not the usual Cecil B. DeMillion dollar spectacle for which he is most famous, but like his better known Biblical epics, this modern-day story has enough costumes to go around, especially the ones worn at the masquerade party. After repeated viewing, MADAM Satan comes across like a typical Norma Shearer and Robert Montgomery drawing room comedy or something directed by George Cukor. At other times it leaves to the imagination of an Ernst Lubitsch sex comedy, but nearly fails on all counts. What saves this from becoming a total disaster is the oddball costume party. Without seeing his name on the credits, it would be hard to imagine MADAM Satan directed by DeMille, best known for religious epics, but it should be known that DeMille did specialized in this sort of comedy in the silent era with those starring Gloria Swanson, some years before director Ernst Lubitsch set the standard.

MADAM Satan might have succeeded had the story been shortened and vocalizing dubbed for Kay Johnson. Because Johnson at times resembles or plays like a slightly mature Irene Dunne, a movie like MADAM SATIN would have called for the likeness of Dunne, both actress and singer, then under contract to RKO Radio. Lillian Roth's performance as the fun-loving other woman does spark some life into her character, which is no different from the roles she performed at her home lot of Paramount at the time. On the whole, the one who comes off best and memorably in MADAM Satan is Roland Young as Jim, who assumes some of the film's witty one liners (Tyler Brooke: "I've never repented a sin," Young: "I've never repeated one,") and funnier actions. First to try to pass off Trixie (Roth) as his wife to Angela, who knows her husband's friend is only making the pretense to cover up for her husband's infidelity. The pretense reaches an amusing climax when Jim has to undress and get in bed with "his wife," with Angela's constant intrusions. Following the airship disaster where all the party guests must parachute from the dirigible, all landing around Central Park ranging from inside a convertible with another couple smooching in the front seat to the reservoir. As for Young's character, he lands on a tree branch inside a lion's cage in the zoo. Below he watches the lions roaring up at him. He then observes a sign that reads when the next feeding time is for the lions will be. He then slowly looks at his watch. Regardless of slow pacing, the redeeming quality goes to Young, who even has the final closing rather than the leading players.

MADAM Satan was distributed on video cassette in the 1990s, and can be seen occasionally during the late night hours on Turner Classic Movies. Movies dealing with wives putting their unsuspecting husbands to the test are usually fun to see, but while MADAM Satan might be categorized as one of the weakest of the lot, it does propose some redeeming qualities that make this one of the most unusual production by either or both DeMille and MGM. (**)

Was the above review useful to you?
See more (28 total) »

Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for Madam Satan (1930)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
Man, pre-code Hollywood was awesome FilmKoala
DVD censored? goblinhairedguy
Finally out on DVD jwc53531
See more »

Recommendations

If you enjoyed this title, our database also recommends:
- - - - -
The Rules of the Game The Mysterious Pilot Eyes Wide Shut Mildred Pierce The Painted Veil
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
Show more recommendations

Related Links

Full cast and crew Company credits External reviews
News articles IMDb Musical section IMDb USA section

You may report errors and omissions on this page to the IMDb database managers. They will be examined and if approved will be included in a future update. Clicking the 'Edit page' button will take you through a step-by-step process.