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Golden Dawn (1930)

Passed  -  Comedy | Drama | Musical  -  14 June 1930 (USA)
5.4
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Ratings: 5.4/10 from 85 users  
Reviews: 9 user | 5 critic

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(from the operetta by), (from the operetta by), 1 more credit »
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Title: Golden Dawn (1930)

Golden Dawn (1930) on IMDb 5.4/10

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Walter Woolf King ...
Tom Allen (as Walter Woolf)
Vivienne Segal ...
Dawn
Noah Beery ...
Shep Keyes
Alice Gentle ...
Mooda
Dick Henderson ...
Duke
Lupino Lane ...
Pigeon
Marion Byron ...
Joanna
Edward Martindel ...
Col. Judson
Nina Quartero ...
Maid-in-Waiting
Sôjin Kamiyama ...
Piper (as Sojin)
Otto Matieson ...
Capt. Eric
Julanne Johnston ...
Sister Hedwig
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Storyline

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Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Musical

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

14 June 1930 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Golden Dawn  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (Turner Library print)

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Apparatus)

Color:

(Two-strip Technicolor) (original print)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The operetta opened in New York on 30 November 1927 and had 184 performances. See more »

Goofs

Composer Herbert Stothart is billed as "Hubert" in the opening credits. See more »

Soundtracks

Mulungu Thabu
(uncredited)
Music by Emmerich Kálmán and Herbert Stothart
Lyrics by Otto A. Harbach and Oscar Hammerstein II
Sung by chorus with spoken interjections by Nigel de Brulier
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User Reviews

 
You won't be bored...
12 December 2009 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

...and isn't boredom the worst cinematic experience one can have anyways? I watched Golden Dawn expecting a bore-fest full of static performances and wretched operatic screeching, having heard its reputation as the worst surviving movie musical ever made. Instead I experienced something so campy it is worthy of TCM Underground's Friday night cult film festivals.

This film definitely did not turn out like Warner Brothers expected, I'm sure. It failed at the box office and is today a very unintentionally funny film. The film is set during the first World War in Africa. It is about a native girl, Dawn (Vivienne Segal), who has supposedly been blessed by the gods to appear white, thus marking her as the future bride of the native's god - a statue that appears to be a giant likeness of Mr. Bill from the old 70's skits on Saturday Night Live. A British soldier loves Dawn, but their love is thwarted at every turn both by the fact that the occupying Europeans don't want any trouble with the natives, which they'd have if Tom Allen (Walter Woolf King) eloped with the bride of the native god, and by Shep Keyes, a native bully and strong man who wants Dawn for himself.

Shep (Noah Beery) is supposed to be an African native, yet his name and his accent are purely Gone with the Wind. Plus his black-face makeup is very obviously melting off of his body through his clothing under the hot Technicolor lights, but nobody seems to notice.

There are a large group of civilian Americans and Europeans in the story, and the reason for their presence in this remote African village is never explained. Neither is any reason given as to why they all speak like they're from Queens. One of the things in this film that does work as funny and probably intentionally so is the wiry anemic Ned Sparks-like Lee Moran as Blink and Marion Byron as Joanna, Blink's rough and bossy girlfriend. The one number that works in this film is their rendition of the Song "A Tiger", which Joanna certainly is and Blink definitely is not.

This film, made in 1930, is still using title cards to transition between scenes, something that was still common in the late Vitaphone era. However, even here there are laughs to be found. One title card reads "There was no joy among the natives. A draught was destroying them." As there is no mention of beer or wind in this film, I can only assume the title card writer meant "draught" to be "drought".

For a little over an hour of campy fun in the tradition of "The Dueling Cavalier" in Singin in the Rain, you just can't beat this one.


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