Flip the Frog is the featured performer at an outdoor nightclub in the forest. His dancing and piano-playing please the crowd of critters.

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(uncredited)
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Storyline

Flip the Frog jumps happily from lily pad to lily pad, crossing the pond in order to get to an outdoor nightclub in the forest. Flip is the featured performer, and the crowd of critters is happy to see him. As the insect orchestra plays below, Flip dances on a tree stump. Later, he plays the piano as a mouse accompanies him on the violin. The piano cries during a sad song, and Flip has to blow its nose. Flip offends his instrument by caressing its leg with a bit too much familiarity. The piano kicks Flip, and the frog retaliates by punching the keys as he plays. Flip's violent performance leads to a crashing finish. Written by J. Spurlin

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Release Date:

16 August 1930 (USA)  »

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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

(Cinephone)

Color:

(2-strip Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.20 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

One of only two Flip the Frog cartoons produced in color. See more »

Soundtracks

The Infernal Galop
(uncredited)
Written by Jacques Offenbach
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Iwerks made this to challenge Disney?!
24 May 2009 | by (Bradenton, Florida) – See all my reviews

Considering that Ub Iwerks made the early Mickey Mouse cartoons, you'd think that once he went out on his own that he'd have something a lot better than this insipid Flip the Frog cartoon as his debut film. But, time has shown us that his Celebrity Productions was only short-lived and eventually he'd return to work for Disney Studios.

So what didn't I like about the cartoon? Well, it was incredibly dull and Flip had the charisma of a can of floor wax. Instead of a Mickey-like character, all Flip did was dance about like a character from a Disney Silly Symphony short--but it was not as good as the Disney offering. This, unfortunately, was a portent of things to come, as Iwerks and the rest of the newer studios spent most of the 1930s making cutesy cartoons with too much singing and dancing and not enough humor.

What was there to like? Well, it was in color and that was something for 1930. It was obvious that Iwerks wanted the cartoon to look good--too bad it just wasn't funny or entertaining.

Oh, by the way, I agree with the other reviewer who expressed surprise that Disney didn't sue over this cartoon. In addition to Flip, there is a mouse who is surprisingly Mickey-like and the rest of the mice sure looked familiar!


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