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The Devil to Pay! (1930)

6.7
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Ratings: 6.7/10 from 225 users  
Reviews: 6 user | 1 critic

Spendthrift Willie Leyland again returns to the family home in London penniless. His father is none too pleased but Willie smooth-talks him into letting him stay. At the same time he turns ... See full summary »

Director:

(as Geo. Fitzmaurice)

Writers:

(story), (screen adaptation)
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Title: The Devil to Pay! (1930)

The Devil to Pay! (1930) on IMDb 6.7/10

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
Willie Hale
Frederick Kerr ...
Lord Leland
...
Dorothy Hope
David Torrence ...
Mr. Hope
Florence Britton ...
Susan Hale
...
Mary Crayle
Paul Cavanagh ...
Grand Duke Paul
Crauford Kent ...
Arthur (as Crawford Kent)
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Storyline

Spendthrift Willie Leyland again returns to the family home in London penniless. His father is none too pleased but Willie smooth-talks him into letting him stay. At the same time he turns the charm on Dorothy Hope, whose father is big in linoleum and who, before Willie's arrival, was about to become engaged to a Russian aristocrat. Written by Jeremy Perkins <jwp@aber.ac.uk>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

russian | auction | nobility | engagement | dog | See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Romance

Certificate:

TV-G
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

20 December 1930 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The Devil to Pay!  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(TCM print)

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See  »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This was Frederick Lonsdale's first original screenplay, and it was not based on a play, as some references state. See more »

Goofs

When Willie is in conference with Lord Leland, the details of the fireplace can be seen in detail, and it is obvious that the inside is a flat painted to resemble a hearth. See more »

Soundtracks

One Heavenly Night
(uncredited)
from One Heavenly Night (1931)
Music by Nacio Herb Brown
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User Reviews

 
Wholly delightful comedy romance
23 May 2008 | by (United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

This film directed by George Fitzmaurice, who made so many excellent films, is well up to his excellent standard. It is crisp, witty, with some wonderful lines, and has the inimitable Ronald Colman in the romantic lead. Colman plays the irresistibly charming younger son of a wealthy English peer. He is financially irresponsible (spending, for instance, £15 of his last £20 in the world on a cute little terrier whom he names George), but open, wildly generous, contemptuous of lucre, irreverent in the politest possible way, and hopelessly sentimental. He is so dashing that all the women fall in love with him. His girlfriend is a star of the music halls, and hence in 1930 a denizen of the demi-monde, played with her typical svelte, narrow-eyed silkiness by the youthful Myrna Loy. Fitzmaurice was not a great user of closeups, and gals of that day had their faces half-hidden with those awful clinging hats anyway, so we do not get as good glimpses of the faces of the two heroines as we would like. The director seems more interested in the charming Colman, anyway. The romantic female lead is the youthful and fresh-faced Loretta Young, who had not yet become the proto-Julie Andrews we generally know her as, but was still a blushing girl exuding all the sweetness of a rose garden and laughing merrily and heartily the whole time. It is obvious that a character with her terrific sense of humour was needed to appreciate the snob-busting social anarchism of the refreshing aristocratic character played by Colman. The plot barely matters, as is so often the case with these light and amusing films. This is just such fun.


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