6.6/10
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Children of Pleasure (1930)

Approved | | Comedy, Musical, Romance | 26 April 1930 (USA)
Successful songwriter falls for society girl who is just playing around. He doesn't realize that his girl-Friday is the one he really loves until it is almost too late. Although he is ... See full summary »

Director:

Writers:

(play), (scenario)
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
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...
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Pat Thayer (as Helen Johnson)
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Rod Peck (as Kenneth Thompson)
Lee Kohlmar ...
Bernie (as Lee Kolmar)
May Boley ...
Fanny Kaye
...
Andy Little
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Storyline

Successful songwriter falls for society girl who is just playing around. He doesn't realize that his girl-Friday is the one he really loves until it is almost too late. Although he is dazzled by high society, he overhears the society girl's admission of just fooling in time to avoid marriage. Played against a theatrical backdrop, there are lots of songs and production numbers. Written by Ed Lorusso

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Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Details

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Release Date:

26 April 1930 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Manhattan  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Sound System)

Color:

(2-strip Technicolor) (one sequence)|

Aspect Ratio:

1.20 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The 2-strip Technicolor sequence, running approximately 500 feet, occurs in Reel 3. The musical number "Dust" is performed on sage by May Boley and a chorus of girls dressed as devils, while Lawrence Gray looks on. It survives intact in the TCM print.It was used again in Roast-Beef and Movies (1934). See more »

Connections

Edited into Roast-Beef and Movies (1934) See more »

Soundtracks

Dust
(1930) (uncredited)
Music by Fred Fisher
Lyrics by Andy Rice
Sung by Lawrence Gray and Wynne Gibson
Reprised by May Boley and chorus
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User Reviews

 
Primitive Tuneful Delight For The Archivist Only
2 August 2014 | by (Paradise, California) – See all my reviews

If you are possibly going to spend 75 minutes or so out of your life watching an early musical from MGM, there's a strong chance you already know what you're in for--this short quickie, compared to a creation from Busby Berkeley at Warner's a few years later, is primitive indeed, but captures a time and place in Hollywood like few other films are able to do.

The plot is simple--winsome secretary loves a songwriter who falls for a society dame. The songwriter is zippy Lawrence Gray who smiles through his tears, and composes a song when he wants to express himself in love or out of it. One of his interpreters (and comic relief) is a Sophie Tucker type, a sort of Red Hot Mama attached to her ethnic pianist (at least that's how's he's played). We get some peeks at various musical numbers, some out-of-step minstrels in a theatre and a nutty song and dance in a nightclub--and "you ain't seen nothing" until you've seen the production number for "Dust," one of the hero's hits--with several helpings of actual dust--and later, a catchy little number "The Whole Darned Things For You."

The pleasures in this film are to be found in the sense of history it represents, awkward dealings with the sound, none of it prerecorded--even an outdoor encounter with comedian Jack Benny is fascinating, and one wonders if the subway entrance was a location shot or on the MGM lot. "Jiminy Cricket" Cliff Edwards also makes a jokey cameo, and the film zips along at a good pace--but ending as if the producer decided the company had run out of resources and just called "cut" and "print." Children of Pleasure is an archivist's delight!


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