7.3/10
2,580
55 user 37 critic

The Big Trail (1930)

Breck Coleman leads hundreds of settlers in covered wagons from the Mississippi River to their destiny out West.

Directors:

, (uncredited)

Writer:

(story)
Reviews

On Disc

at Amazon

1 win. See more awards »
Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Certificate: Passed Western
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.8/10 X  

Deputy Sheriff John Steele recruits bandit Sonora Joe to help him find out who's been bumping off all the local lawmen and rustling the cattle.

Director: Tenny Wright
Stars: John Wayne, Noah Beery, Paul Hurst
Comedy | Romance | Western
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7/10 X  

During the Alaska gold rush, prospector George sends partner Sam to Seattle to bring his fiancée but when it turns out that she married another man, Sam returns with a pretty substitute, the hostess of the Henhouse dance hall.

Director: Henry Hathaway
Stars: John Wayne, Stewart Granger, Ernie Kovacs
Certificate: Passed Mystery | Western
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.8/10 X  

Clint Turner is arrested for the murder of his girlfriend Judy's father, a rival rancher who was an enemy of his own father.

Director: D. Ross Lederman
Stars: Buck Jones, John Wayne, Susan Fleming
Certificate: Passed Music | Romance | Western
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.6/10 X  

Bad guy Kincaid controls the local water supply and plans to do in the other ranchers. Government agent Saunders shows up undercover to do in Kincaid and win the heart of one of his victims Fay Denton.

Director: Robert N. Bradbury
Stars: John Wayne, Cecilia Parker, Forrest Taylor
Comedy | Musical
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.1/10 X  

Phil and Pete compete for Mary's love and also in a contest for best song written by a college student.

Director: James Tinling
Stars: Lois Moran, David Percy, Helen Twelvetrees
Haunted Gold (1932)
Certificate: Passed Horror | Mystery | Western
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.5/10 X  

John and Janet get a weird letter telling them to go to a ghost town which has an abandoned mine. There they contend with bad guys looking for hidden gold. They are aided by a mysterious Phantom.

Director: Mack V. Wright
Stars: John Wayne, Duke, Sheila Terry
Certificate: Passed Western
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.4/10 X  

Imprisoned for a murder he did not commit, John Brant escapes and ends up out west where, after giving the local lawmen the slip, he joins up with an outlaw gang. Brant finds out that '... See full summary »

Director: Armand Schaefer
Stars: John Wayne, Nancy Shubert, Lane Chandler
Mystery | Western | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.1/10 X  

Ranch hand Rocklin arrives in town to start his new job but his employer has been murdered and the locals don't seem too friendly.

Director: Edwin L. Marin
Stars: John Wayne, Ella Raines, Ward Bond
Arizona (1931)
Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6/10 X  

Bob refuses to marry his girlfriend and leaves her. She marries his close friend out of revenge.

Director: George B. Seitz
Stars: Laura La Plante, John Wayne, June Clyde
Romance | Western
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7/10 X  

Quirt Evans, an all round bad guy, is nursed back to health and sought after by Penelope Worth, a Quaker girl. He eventually finds himself having to choose between his world and the world Penelope lives in.

Director: James Edward Grant
Stars: John Wayne, Gail Russell, Harry Carey
Western
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.7/10 X  

After the Civil War, ex-Union Colonel John Henry Thomas and ex-Confederate Colonel James Langdon are leading two disparate groups of people through strife-torn Mexico. John Henry and ... See full summary »

Director: Andrew V. McLaglen
Stars: John Wayne, Rock Hudson, Antonio Aguilar
Adventure | Romance | War
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.2/10 X  

A Union Cavalry outfit is sent behind Confederate lines in strength to destroy a rail/supply center. Along with them is sent a doctor who causes instant antipathy between him and the ... See full summary »

Director: John Ford
Stars: John Wayne, William Holden, Constance Towers
Edit

Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
...
...
Gus
...
Zeke
...
Red Flack (as Tyrone Power)
David Rollins ...
Dave Cameron
Frederick Burton ...
Pa Bascom
...
Bill Thorpe
...
Lopez
...
Gus's mother-in-law
Edit

Storyline

Breck leads a wagon train of pioneers through Indian attack, storms, deserts, swollen rivers, down cliffs and so on while looking for the murder of a trapper and falling in love with Ruth. Written by Ed Stephan <stephan@cc.wwu.edu>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

The Most Important Picture Ever Produced


Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

1 November 1930 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Raoul Walsh's The Big Trail  »

Box Office

Budget:

$2,000,000 (estimated)
 »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (FMC Library Print) | (TCM print) | (35 mm)

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.20 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

This was his only talking film of Tyrone Power Sr., father of Tyrone Power. He died in 1931. See more »

Goofs

In the last scene where Breck and Ruth are reunited, Breck comes up the trail and is seen by Ruth. A close up of Breck shows him carrying his rifle in his right hand. Breck starts to run to meet Ruth.

The shot shifts to a distant shot as we watch Ruth and Breck running to each other. Breck's rifle is now slung over his shoulder. See more »

Quotes

Red Flack, Wagon Boss: Well, if it ain't Bill Thorpe, hey? I always thought you was hung and planted, I expect.
Bill Thorpe: No, my time ain't arrived yet.
Red Flack, Wagon Boss: But it looks as though it might be drawing close.
Bill Thorpe: Well, I've been promised a hanging bee if I don't get out on the Penzy Belle, and the Captain promised me a necktie party if I set foot on the boat. It's a case of nowhere to go.
Red Flack, Wagon Boss: It appears to me you do your shooting by daylight with too many people looking on, hey?
See more »

Connections

Featured in The John Wayne Anthology (1991) See more »

Soundtracks

Song of the Big Trail
(1930) (uncredited)
Music by James F. Hanley
Lyrics by Joseph McCarthy
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Grandeur Version vs. Standard Version: They are not the same.
6 June 2004 | by (Walnut Creek, California) – See all my reviews

Contrary to the comment posted directly below, The Big Trail (1930) was not filmed in a three-camera process "much like the later Cinerama." That was the finale to Napoleon (1927), a different film entirely! The Big Trail was simultaneously shot in both 35mm and 70mm (Grandeur) versions, and both versions are shown on Fox Movie Channel from time to time, so it's easy to compare one with the other. The Grandeur version (broadcast in letterbox @ approximately its original 2-1 ratio) is more impressive cinematically with its wide angle panoramas, but suffers from the same problem that beset early CinemaScopes, a lack of close-ups forced upon director Raoul Walsh because of focus problems. Scenes involving individuals rather than crowds or long shots are much more effective in the standard version because the camera can move closer to the players thereby achieving a greater sense of involvement for the viewer. Watching the two versions simultaneously, one gets an accurate idea of which shots Walsh chose to shoot close-up, in the standard version, but could not, in the Grandeur version. There are also a couple sequences involving El Brendel: a shell game with Ian Keith, and some business with his wife & a jackass, which are in the Grandeur version, but missing from the standard version.

For the record, The Big Trail is the only one of three Fox Grandeur films which has survived in its original wide screen format. (The other two are Fox Movietone Follies of 1929, completely lost, and Happy Days, which survives only in standard format.) Other studios also experimented with wide film at this time, but the only other one still known to exist in both formats is The Bat Whispers, filmed in both 65mm and 35mm, and released by United Artists. Other wide films were MGM's Billy the Kid (1930) and The Great Meadow (1931), RKO's Danger Lights (1930), and WB's The Lash (1930), all of which can be seen in their standard format versions on Turner Classic Movies. WB's Kismet (1930) was also filmed both wide and standard, but seems to have completely disappeared; it is rumored to be lost.

Why did wide film fail in 1930? Theaters were reeling (pun intended) under the impact of the stock market crash of October 1929, and the spiraling costs of installing sound equipment, and so were adverse to taking on the added expense of installing additional new projection equipment and new wider screens to accommodate just a handful of films, photographed in a variety of different systems that were not even always compatible with each other. It would not be until 1953 when Fox, now Twentieth Century-Fox, would try again, and this time succeed, with the introduction of wide screen CinemaScope.


62 of 69 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?