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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Lita
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Jerry Flanagan
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Madame Durand (as Blanche Frederici)
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Madame Pompier
Ullrich Haupt ...
Pierre Ferrande
Mitchell Lewis ...
Borloff
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Blochet
Charles McNaughton ...
Petey
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Gida
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Judge
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Prosecutor
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Warden
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Sailor
Harry Stubbs ...
Sailor
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Storyline

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Musical

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Release Date:

3 May 1930 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

A Ilha do Terror  »

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(MovieTone)

Aspect Ratio:

1.20 : 1
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Trivia

This film is one of over 200 titles in the list of independent feature films made available for television presentation by Advance Television Pictures announced in Motion Picture Herald 4 April 1942. At this time, television broadcasting was in its infancy, almost totally curtailed by the advent of World War II, and would not continue to develop until 1945-1946. Because of poor documentation (feature films were often not identified by title in conventional sources) no record has yet been found of its initial television broadcast. Its earliest documented Post WWII telecasts took place in Salt Lake City Wednesday 12 October 1949 on KDYL (Channel 4) and in Philadelphia Saturday 17 December 1949 on WCAU (Channel 10). See more »

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User Reviews

 
Aptly titled transitional talker
5 July 2002 | by (Easley, SC) – See all my reviews

Someone please decaffienate poor Delores Del Rio and open Mr. Lowe's eyes. Alas, no one uttered these directions to our leads. And so is spoiled a film of promise. How much cringing can one endure to enjoy some awesome sets from William Cameron Menzies? Edmund Lowe "sings", but I wouldn't call it music (embarrassing, perhaps). Miss Del Rio, clearly lost for how to act in a talking picture, emotes about 150 miles per hour. Scene after scene for the first 30 minutes is rasberry-worthy. This is such a shame, because work from the seconds and art direction invite scrutiny. A marvelous French village and prison are sumptuously photographed, and Mr. Lowe occasionally recovers the steely, resolved look that kept him popular through the '30's. Certainly, a textbook case of the birth of a new art form, and the difficulties the transition wrought.


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