IMDb > All Quiet on the Western Front (1930)
All Quiet on the Western Front
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All Quiet on the Western Front (1930) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

User Rating:
8.1/10   40,851 votes »
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Down 4% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
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View company contact information for All Quiet on the Western Front on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
24 August 1930 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
At last....the motion picture!
Plot:
A young soldier faces profound disillusionment in the soul-destroying horror of World War I. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Awards:
Won 2 Oscars. Another 4 wins & 2 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
Great acting, great directing make a sincere, emotional film. See more (186 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)
Louis Wolheim ... Kat

Lew Ayres ... Paul (as Lewis Ayres)
John Wray ... Himmelstoss
Arnold Lucy ... Kantorek

Ben Alexander ... Kemmerich (as Kemmerick)
Scott Kolk ... Leer
Owen Davis Jr. ... Peter
Walter Rogers ... Behn (as Walter Browne Rogers)

William Bakewell ... Albert
Russell Gleason ... Mueller
Richard Alexander ... Westhus
Harold Goodwin ... Detering

Slim Summerville ... Tjaden (as 'Slim' Summerville)
G. Pat Collins ... Bertinck (as Pat Collins)
Beryl Mercer ... Paul's Mother
Edmund Breese ... Herr Meyer
rest of cast listed alphabetically:

Zasu Pitts ... Frau Bäumer - Silent Version Trailer only (scenes deleted)
Ernie Adams ... 2nd Medic Orderly (uncredited)
Marion Clayton Anderson ... Anna Bäumer (uncredited)
Poupée Andriot ... French Girl (uncredited)
Vince Barnett ... Assistant Cook (uncredited)
Daisy Belmore ... Frau Kemmerick (uncredited)
Glen Boles ... Young Soldier (uncredited)
Heinie Conklin ... Joseph Hammacher (uncredited)
Yola d'Avril ... Suzanne (uncredited)
Renée Damonde ... French Girl (uncredited)
Arthur Gardner ... Student (uncredited)
Raymond Griffith ... Gérard Duval (uncredited)
Ellen Hall ... Young Girl (uncredited)
William Irving ... Ginger - the Cook (uncredited)
Frederick Kohner ... Minor Role (uncredited)
Frank Leichtfried ... Minor Role (uncredited)
Tom London ... 1st Medic Orderly (uncredited)
Bertha Mann ... Sister Libertine (uncredited)
Joan Marsh ... Poster Girl (uncredited)

Edwin Maxwell ... Herr Bäumer (uncredited)
Jack McHugh ... Schoolboy (uncredited)
Maurice Murphy ... Soldier (uncredited)
Robert Parrish ... Schoolboy (uncredited)
Bodil Rosing ... Mother of Hospital Patient (uncredited)
Wolfgang Staudte ... Minor Role (uncredited)
Jack Sutherland ... Minor Role (uncredited)
David Tyrell ... Soldier (uncredited)
Dorothy Vernon ... Charwoman (uncredited)

Fred Zinnemann ... Minor Role (uncredited)
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Directed by
Lewis Milestone 
 
Writing credits
Erich Maria Remarque (by)

Maxwell Anderson (adaptation & dialogue)

George Abbott (screen play)

Del Andrews (adaptation)

C. Gardner Sullivan (supervising story chief)

Walter Anthony  titles for silent version (uncredited)
Lewis Milestone  uncredited

Produced by
Carl Laemmle Jr. .... producer
 
Original Music by
Sam Perry (silent version) (uncredited)
Heinz Roemheld (silent version) (uncredited)
 
Cinematography by
Arthur Edeson 
Karl Freund (uncredited)
 
Film Editing by
Edgar Adams (film editor)
Milton Carruth (silent version)
Edward L. Cahn (uncredited)
 
Art Direction by
Charles D. Hall 
William R. Schmidt  (as W.R. Schmitt)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Nate Watt .... assistant director
 
Sound Department
C. Roy Hunter .... recording supervisor
William Hedgcock .... sound technician (uncredited)
 
Special Effects by
Frank H. Booth .... special photographic effects (uncredited)
Harry Lonsdale .... special effects (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Tony Gaudio .... camera operator: second camera (uncredited)
Cliff Shirpser .... assistant camera (uncredited)
 
Editorial Department
David Broekman .... synchronization
Maurice Pivar .... supervising film editor
 
Music Department
David Broekman .... music supervisor: synchronization and score
William Axt .... composer: stock music (silent version) (uncredited)
Giuseppe Becce .... composer: stock music (silent version) (uncredited)
Adolph Fink .... orchestrator (non-dialogue version) (uncredited)
Hugo Frey .... composer: stock music (silent version ) (uncredited)
Arthur Honegger .... composer: stock music (silent version ) (uncredited)
Christiaan Kreins .... composer: stock music (silent version ) (uncredited)
Sam Perry .... music adaptor (silent version) (uncredited)
Andor Pinter .... orchestrator (non-dialogue version) (uncredited)
Erno Rapee .... composer: stock music (silent version) (uncredited)
Heinz Roemheld .... conductor (uncredited)
Heinz Roemheld .... musical adaptation (uncredited)
Domenico Savino .... composer: stock music (silent version ) (uncredited)
William Schiller .... orchestrator (non-dialogue version) (uncredited)
Meredith Willson .... composer: stock music (silent version) (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Carl Laemmle .... presenter
George Cukor .... dialogue director (uncredited)
Lewis Milestone .... hand double: Lew Ayres (uncredited)
Hans von Morhart .... advisor: military history (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


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Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
UK:145 min (cut) | UK:147 min (BBFC submission before censorship) | Germany:136 min | USA:133 min (restored version: Library of Congress) | 138 min (copyright length) | Spain:128 min (DVD edition) | USA:101 min (TV version)
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.20 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Western Electric Sound System)
Certification:
Argentina:13 (original rating) | Argentina:Atp (re-rating) | Australia:PG | Austria:(Banned) (1931-1945) | Germany:(Banned) (1931-1945) | Iceland:12 | Netherlands:16 (DVD rating) | Netherlands:14 (re-rating) (1959) | Netherlands:18 (re-rating) (1946) | Netherlands:18 (original rating) (1931) | New Zealand:(Banned) (original rating) (1930) | Norway:16 | South Korea:15 | Sweden:15 | UK:A (original rating) (cut) | UK:PG (re-rating) (2003) (uncut) | UK:PG (video rating) (1986) | USA:Unrated | USA:TV-PG (TV rating) | West Germany:12 (re-rating)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The iconic final shot was filmed during the editing process. All the actors had left so that is actually Lewis Milestone's hand we see in the final shot.See more »
Goofs:
Revealing mistakes: As men are seen being shot by a German machine gun, they are seen just falling down dead. In reality, the power from such weapons was so great that the fire blew large chunks of the target's body away. By example, a single volley at Passchendale ripped both my grandfather's left leg and arm completely off, although, miraculously, he did survive.See more »
Quotes:
[first lines]
Man cleaning doorknob:Thirty thousand.
Maid:From the Russians?
Man cleaning doorknob:No, from the French. From the Russians we capture more than that every day.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Featured in Half Shot Shooters (1936)See more »
Soundtrack:
All Quiet on the Western FrontSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
89 out of 107 people found the following review useful.
Great acting, great directing make a sincere, emotional film., 17 May 2001
Author: Kian Eftekhari (kian_ef@hotmail.com) from Houston, Texas

To say that this movie is one of the greatest war films of all time would be an understatement. Naturally, since the picture is based on Erich Maria Remarque's marvelous novel, the screenwriter was given quite a powerful story to begin with. The three main reasons why I consider this movie so forceful are the acting, the cinematography, and simply the sincerity.

Lew Ayres, the man who plays Paul Baumer, convincingly portrays the main character in many ways. First of all, the sheer innocence of his facial appearance adds a poignant touch to the film, because the overwhelming theme of the story is how the war effects all young people of each nation, whether that person dies in the trenches or survives only to lament his days in the war. Ironically, when the film was initially being put together, Remarque, the novelist who won critical acclaim for writing the book, was asked to play the role of Paul. Having seen time in the war the producers must have thought him aptly prepared to play the role. But he declined because he had other commitments and because he felt he was not such a great actor. Lucky for us, because Ayres gives a powerful performance. Other characters with relatively minor roles have major importance in the film because they portray touching, heart wrenching scene s of death. These peripheral characters all help add to the general tone of the film (and the book) because they show how dark and terrible the war can be; and they in turn show how propaganda can be so harmful, because most of the soldiers in Paul's regiment are volunteers who receive a very rude awakening when they discover what the war is really all about. The acting is simply superb, and perhaps this is due to the fact that the famous director George Cukor was an assistant who, although uncredited, came onto the set to help supervise the actors (possibly because director Lewis Milestone's English was not too good).

The cinematography of this film is absolutely magnificent. The film rarely has gory sequences because the director finds other ways to imply death and still have the same emotional effect. One way in which he does this is by showing single body parts (such as a hand or a leg) and allowing these appendages to show the death of the soldier as a whole. Also, the cameraman uses overhead angles at times with great skill and also focuses on the trenches at times as the soldiers fall back into them after being shot (which implies that the trenches are a symbol of hell, because soldiers fall into them to die). In short, the cinematographer Arthur Edeson allows the camera to do the talking and to drive the film, rather than the dialogue (speaking of which, there is relatively little; the actors' facial expressions do the bulk of the talking in the film).

When I say this film is sincere I really can't give you any tangible evidence to prove the point; all I can tell you is to see the film. The film at times overwhelmed me with emotion to the extent that I got goose bumps from watching some of the more agonizing scenes. In a way, this movie is much like a silent film. This stands to reason because it came at the very beginning of the 'talkie' age, only three years after The Jazz Singer (1927). Also, Milestone directed silent films before this one, and he seemed to know that less focus on dialogue and more focus on acting would bring about an overwhelmingly emotional and well, sincere, film. The film obviously had an effect on its star, Mr. Ayres, because once World War II began and he was drafted into the war, he conscientiously protested serving in the army because of his opinions towards war. I believe he admits that his opinions stem from his work in this movie. Certainly this is a powerful admission, because his protest caused him and his films to be blacklisted in Hollywood, and his career suffered greatly because of his ideals. So if you don't believe my words about the power of this film, believe his.

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Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for All Quiet on the Western Front (1930)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
Why is this not in the top 250? kristian_valen92
couldnt get through it. cjhorse
How come this isn't in the public domain? igitt
Can someone explain World War I to me? mark-1602
Last Veteran From The Trenches Died Today hjaaber
Remake in the Works historymantbc
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