7.4/10
7
2 user

The Greenwood Tree (1929)

Under the Greenwood Tree (original title)
A girl organist is blamed for ousting the village choir.

Director:

Writers:

(novel), (scenario and dialogue) | 3 more credits »
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Cast

Cast overview:
Marguerite Allan ...
Peggie Robb-Smith ...
Allan (voice)
...
...
Maud Gill ...
Old Maid
Wilfred Shine ...
Roberta Abel ...
Penny
Antonia Brough ...
Maid
Tom Coventry ...
Tranter Dewey
Robison Page ...
Grandfather Dewey
Tubby Phillips ...
Tubby
...
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Storyline

A girl organist is blamed for ousting the village choir.

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Plot Keywords:

based on novel | See All (1) »

Genres:

Drama

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Release Date:

11 December 1930 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The Greenwood Tree  »

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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.20 : 1
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Connections

Version of Under the Greenwood Tree (2005) See more »

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User Reviews

 
rather clunky early sound film, not without charm
6 June 2009 | by (United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

Adapted from one of Thomas Hardy's lightweight early novels, this does not have the complexity or depth of the likes of 'Jude the Obscure'; still, it is a portrait given to the comic of village life alongside a simple young romance.

Fancy Day (Marguerite Allen) is a schoolteacher, although her voice would suggest a Royal upbringing - apparently her voice was dubbed, and not well. Dick Dewy (John Batten) is the son of a tranter and violinist in the village Quire, with some aspirations to succeed in life further than his father and grandfather. Of course he falls for Fancy at first sight, starting a rivalry with rich landowner Shinar (Nigel Barrie), who overacts somewhat, twirling his moustache while plotting his rival's downfall.

Is the film any good? It's not bad for an early sound film but suffers from the limitations of filming available in dialogue scenes; however, the photography by Claude Friese-Greene is beautiful and the music in the film (apart from the ghastly quartet singing the farmyard song) is very well done. The acting could be a bit better though and Wilfred Shine as the parson perhaps comes out the best.


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